EarShot Composer Archive


Since 2007, EarShot, the national orchestra composition discovery network, has been working with orchestras across the country to identify the most exciting new music by the most promising composers. The list below is intended to serve as a resource to orchestra conductors and administrators searching for new repertory and composers.


Each of the composers/works in the searchable list below has been selected, workshopped and read/performed by an EarShot member orchestra. These orchestras represent some of the most accomplished forward-looking musical organizations in the world. Each composer and piece has gone through an extensive vetting process that includes feedback from mentor-composers, conductors, music librarians and top orchestra musicians. The pieces are performance-ready at the highest professional standards.


In addition to searching the list below, you may drill-down to get more details about each piece, including instrumentation, duration, program notes, a portion of or the entire score, an audio excerpt from the reading, as well as the composer’s bio (at the time of the reading), and links to composer websites.


If you have questions about any of the composers/works, please contact EarShot at:
earshot@americancomposers.org.


EarShot is a partnership between the American Composers Orchestra, League of American Orchestras, American Composers Forum, and New Music USA.


The EarShot Composer Archive is made possible with the support of Augusta Gross and the Herb Alpert Foundation.


Name (Descending)

Name Title Year
Timing Listen More Info

YOUNG, Nina C.

Remnants

2013

12:45

Nina C. YOUNG

Remnants

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 12:45

Instrumentation:

2*22*2*.4221.2perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Young is a New York-based composer who writes instrumental and electronic music for the orchestra, theatre, dance and film. Her compositions create a natural and cohesive sound world by incorporating personal research that blends amplification and live electronics with acoustic instrumental ensembles. Young’s music has been performed by the Orkest de Ereprijs, Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, JACK Quartet, Yarn/Wire and Sixtrum and at the 17th International Young Composers Meeting, SEAMUS, Domain Forget, EAMA, the Atlantic Music Festival, and the Bennington Chamber Music Conference. Her music has received honors from BMI, the International Alliance for Women in Music, and the Society for Electro-Acoustic Music in the United States. Young is currently a doctoral fellow at Columbia University under the supervision of Fred Lerdahl, Brad Garton and George Lewis, where she also teaches electroacoustic composition at the Computer Music Center. In 2011 she earned a master’s degree in music composition from McGill University, studying with Sean Ferguson. While in Montreal she worked as a research assistant at the Centre for Research in Music Media and Technology (CIRMMT) and as a studio and teaching assistant at the McGill Digital Composition Studios. Young completed her undergraduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology receiving degrees in ocean engineering and music, in addition to holding a research assistantship at the MIT Media Lab. This summer, she is a Composition Fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center. Young also works as a concert organizer and promoter of new music; she currently serves as General Manager for the publisher APNM (Association for the Promotion of New Music) and as a board member of Columbia Composers.

About Piece:

When a resonant body is activated, the loudness and spectral content of the resulting sound change over time in complex interactions; this process can be described using the Attack Decay Sustain Release model (ADSR).   Remnants explores this interaction of sound over time. The traditional orchestra is treated as a complex but integrated resonant body that can be excited in a variety of ways (Attack). This instigating sound then ripples through the ensemble in a causal chain, with each instrument reacting according to its inherent characteristics (Sustain), losing energy to the process of entropy over time (Decay). Even as the instruments each come to rest at different rates, their reverb trails continue to interact within the acoustic space in which the orchestral machinery is sounded (Release).

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Nina C. Young's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 04/09/2013

YAMADA, Reiko

Afterfeathers, quiver

2009

12:00

Reiko YAMADA

Afterfeathers, quiver

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

2333.4331.tmp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

A native of Hiroshima, Japan, Reiko Yamada holds a Bachelor's degree in Jazz Composition from the Berklee College of Music and a Master's degree in Classical Composition from Boston University.  Her compositions include solo, chamber, choral and orchestral music, as well as collaborative projects with jazz musicians and dancers.
    She is the founder (2005) and artistic director of the JYUGOYA Ensemble, which she led on successful three-city tour in Japan in the summer 2008, presenting a program consisting entirely of her original compositions. Her works have also been performed on such major stages in U.S. as the Boston Symphony Hall, Pickman Hall, Berklee Performance Center and Tsai Performance Center as well as in Europe.
   Yamada has been an Artist in Residence at Wildacres (NC), the Helene Warlitzer Foundation (NM) and the Millay Colony for the Arts (NY). She has been a student of Vuk Kulnovich, Theodore Antoniou, Samuel Headrick and Lukas Foss among others

About Piece:

As Yamada explains, the inspiration for Afterfeathers, quiver came from the body of a “stunningly beautiful female cardinal,” found lifeless near the composer’s house on a chilly morning of January 2007. The piece offers both the composer’s emotional reaction to the discovery and an attempt at reconstructing the last moments of the bird’s consciousness.
 
There are three significant musical elements in the piece. The series of strikes by the entire orchestra represents both the emotional shock of finding the beautiful creature lying on the ground and the imagined cause of the bird’s fall. The chatter created by the strings throughout the piece represents birds in busy conversation. It also refers to daily conversation, the source of information and social identity that is often lost in the buzz of individual worries and self-consciousness. The last of these three elements, repeated notes appearing in the last half of the piece, are sung by an imaginary chorus of bird angels and symbolize the resilience of creative minds. They accompany the listener through the final segment of the piece, representing the hope and liberation that come with the final ascension to the sky. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Reiko Yamada's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 05/07/2009

WILSON, David

Springs of a Desparate Heart

2013

3:05

David WILSON

Springs of a Desparate Heart

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 3:05

Instrumentation:

22*2*2.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Dave Wilson is a Los Angeles-based composer, musician, and ethnomusicologist. Upon graduating from Indiana University with a degree in music, he moved to Macedonia for seven years and collaborated with local jazz musicians. Over the years he has collaborated with several artists including Curt Smith (Tears for Fears), Dave Stewart (Eurhythmics), Engelbert Humperdinck, composer Mateo Messina (Juno, Thank You for Smoking), producer Charlton Pettus, and French gypsy jazz artist Jessica Fichot. As a saxophonist he’s performed at the Chicago World Music Festival, the Lotus Festival, the Guadalajara International Book Fair, the London Palladium, the Sydney Opera House, and the Araneta Colisseum.
Wilson is currently working towards a Ph.D. in Ethnomusicology at UCLA. He is focused on music from Macedonia, and on how traditional and popular music reflect, articulate, and construct national identity, politics, class, and ethnic tensions in the context of a postmodern, post-socialist society.

About Piece:

Wilson's new work, Springs of a Desperate Heart, draws on several musical and cultural influences of his life path, bringing together elements of Macedonian folk music and American jazz in the context of the symphony  orchestra. The piece is a tribute to the life and music of Billie Holiday through the lens of Macedonian folk music and legend surrounding "Biljana's Springs." These springs feed Macedonia's mystical Lake Ohrid, the deepest lake in Europe, and are inextricably linked with their namesake Blijana, a beautiful heroine of Macedonian song and story. Through musical elements that often embody the pain and struggle of life in the Balkans, a new perspective on Holiday is offered, shedding light on the ways music can be imbued with new meanings and interpretations to provide for multi-dimensional understandings of musical artists, works, genres, and cultures.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to David Wilson's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic JCOI

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 04/24/2013

WILLIAMS, Natalie

Les Chanst du Maldoror

2015

16:40

Natalie WILLIAMS

Les Chanst du Maldoror

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 16:40

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.2220.timp+3.pno.str

About Composer:

Natalie Williams is an Australian composer. In 2015 her music will be premiered internationally by ensembles including the Doric String Quartet (UK), the Pavel Haas Quartet (Czech Republic) and the Sydney Conservatorium Wind Symphony. Her works have been commissioned and performed by international ensembles, including the Atlanta Opera, Omaha Symphony, the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra, Musica Viva, the West Australian Symphony Orchestra, Adelaide Baroque, the Sydney Youth Orchestra, the Australian Youth Orchestra, Indiana University Chamber Orchestra, and the Plathner’s Eleven Chamber Ensemble (Germany).
Her music has been championed by performers and toured throughout Europe, Australia and the United States. Composition prizes include; two-time winner of the Atlanta Opera Competition (2013 and 2015), winner of the Iron Composer competition (2010) and joint winner of the inaugural Schueler Awards for a new commission for the Adelaide Symphony Orchestra (2007). She has received professional development grants from the Australasian Performing Rights Association, the British Music Society and the University of Sydney. Natalie has taught composition and music theory at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, the Hugh Hodgson School of Music at the University of Georgia, and the Faculty of Music at the Melbourne Conservatorium. Current commissions include new works for performance at the 17th World Saxophone Conference in Strasbourg and a new wind symphony commemorating the 100th anniversary of the Sydney Conservatorium in 2015.

About Piece:

"Les Chants du Maldoror is a Chamber Symphony, a suite of orchestral contemplations on four etchings by surrealist artist, Salvador Dali. 

Dali was asked to replace Picasso in providing illustrations for inclusion in the 1932 publication of Les Chants du Maldoror; a prose-poem in 6 cantos, written in 1868 by French poet Isidore Ducasse (the Comte de Lautréamont). The text was championed by Andre Breton as a manifesto of the French surrealist movement and Dali completed more than 40 etchings for the 1932 publication.

The opening movement, Identification with the Brother, depicts a kneeling, skeletal, faceless figure, holding at a distance its own face and head. The figure looks at the head with horror, gradually realizing that the face it holds is not the ‘brother’, but actually the face of itself. The movement functions as a musical depiction of the horror of gradual realization. Beginning with a 12-note row, the slow theme develops through an orchestral crescendo, accelerating in texture, speed and pitch height as the music unfolds. 

Obsession of the Angelus, movement 2, features a portrait of Dali’s wife (Gaia) as an angel, looking into the near distance, her head surrounded by angelic wings. Two themes within this movement fight for supremacy; a surreal group of celestial trumpets and a slow-moving chorale for strings and percussion. The Angel’s ‘obsession’ is seen in this persistent cycling and acceleration of the heavenly trumpet choir, repeating its blasts of sound with increasing volume and speed. Underneath this bizarre heavenly chorus, the hymn tune “Angels we have Heard on High” appears softly in an accompanying string and percussion chorale.

The third movement is based on Dali’s, The Memory of Music; portraying a misshapen, floating piano typical of the draped and melting-object styles that appear in Dali’s dream imagery. The instrument gently disappears up a staircase, floating away from its two players and the viewer. A hazy dream-like melody is never stated in entirety, but presented in fragments to reflect the image of music remembered, rather than heard. 

The final movement, The Future and its Enigma illustrates a single running figure, leaping into the vanishing lines of the distance and travelling towards the sunset of the future. The piece features two concurrent cycles, one intervallic and one rhythmic, which move at different rates of change through the piece. Through speed and recurrent rhythm, the piece leaps forward into unresolved harmonies and fragmented melodic ideas, until the two cycles conclude with a violent chord of arrival."

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony New Music Reading

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/03/2015

WICKMAN, Ethan

Les Jeunes et les Immortals

2010

12:00

Ethan WICKMAN

Les Jeunes et les Immortals

Year Composed: 2010

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

1111.2110.timp+2.hrp.str

About Composer:

Night After Night), and “possessed of a flair for colorful orchestration” (Harvey Steiman, San Francisco Classical Voice), composer Ethan Wickman’s music has been performed by such groups as the Aspen Concert Orchestra, the Fargo-Moorhead Symphony, the Newton Symphony, Zeitgeist, the Avalon String Quartet, Flexible Music, the Gryphon Trio, and many others in venues in the U.S. and abroad. He has received grants and commissions from The Barlow Prize, Meet The Composer, and the American Composers Forum, and was recently awarded a commission from the Wisconsin Music Teachers Association as the first-place winner of its annual composition competition. His incidental music was featured on two episodes of the nationally broadcast PBS series Ancestors. His orchestral work Night Prayers Ascending won the Jacob Druckman Prize at the Aspen Music Festival and was a finalist in the 25th Annual ASCAP Rudolf Nissim Orchestral Composition Competition. He is the recipient of fellowships from the Aspen Music Festival, the Norfolk Contemporary Music Workshop/Yale Summer School of Music, the Wellesley Composers Conference, and Fulbright (Madrid, Spain). Current projects include a recent work on released on the Innova label for Zeitgeist, a featured piece for violinist-composer Piotr Szewczyk’s “Violin Futura” project, a new work for world-renowned Euphoniumists Brian Bowman, Neal Corwell, Steven Meade, John Mueller and David Werden, and a CD release of Namasté by the Avalon String Quartet on the Albany Records label. 

About Piece:

While on vacation in France during the summer of 2009 I visited two cemeteries: the American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, known as Omaha Beach, and the German Military Cemetery, also in Normandy. In spite of the contrasting sculptures and stonework in both—be it the muscle-bound and Promethean “Spirit of American Youth” in the one, or the grief-stricken mother and father flanking the large Saxon cross in the other—the ambience in each was poignant and profound. As I wandered among the stone crosses, I marveled acre after acre at the lives laid to rest there—predominantly young lives snuffed out at ages that surreally echo the ages of my students at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire. 

Les Jeunes et les Imortels (“The Young and the Immortal”) is written for the Eau Claire Chamber Orchestra in the memory of the youth swallowed up in the vastly contrasting circumstances of time and place – youth who rode, and continue to ride, the opposing, clashing waves amidst epic ideological confrontations.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ethan Wickman's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Pioneer Valley Symphony Reading

Conductor: Paul Phillips

Date of reading: 04/18/2010

WANG, Amao

Characters in Theatre

2014

7:15

Amao WANG

Characters in Theatre

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 7:15

Instrumentation:

3232.4221.timp+2.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Ms. Wang A-Mao (1986 August 12) was born into a musical family in Beijing, China. From 1996-2004, She studied piano and composition in the Primary and Middle School of the Central Conservatory of Music. From 2004-2009, she studied composition under Professor Tang Jianping at the Central Conservatory of Music, where she received her Bachelor of Arts in Composition.

About Piece:

Beijing Opera is a form of traditional Chinese theater which combines singing, reciting, performing, acrobatics acting, and instrumental accompanying, along with rich face make-up, costume, and stage setting. I applied the pitch material drawn from the fixed instrumental accompanying pattern, the rhythmic material and tone color from percussion ensemble performance, to compose the theme and its development. By contrasting the legato phrases and staccato phrases, altering the rhythm, and employing various dynamics, I attempted to depict the contrast between majestic male roles and delicate female roles.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Amao Wang's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

WANG, Lu

Scenes from the Bosco Sacro

2014

15:00

Lu WANG

Scenes from the Bosco Sacro

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 15:00

Instrumentation:

222*2*.2220.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Ms. Wang has received the second prize of the Palatino Composition Competition (2007) with her piano solo work - Sheng Dan Jing Mo Chou. In 2013, she has awarded the 2014 Missouri Music Teachers Association Composition Commission. In 2011, she was selected as a winner of the Young Composer Project, which was held by the Beijing Modern Music Festival with her chamber music work, The Vox of Swallow and Nightingale. Her East-West instrumentation chamber work The Feeble Breeze, The Sullen Spring was premiered by Music From China at Symphony Space in New York City (2013). Her Chinese chamber music work, The Battle Between Zhong Kui and Ghosts, was performed at the eighth Music Festival of the Central Conservatory of Music (2008). Her orchestral work Plantains in the Rain was read by Kansas City Symphony in 2012.

About Piece:

Beijing Opera is a form of traditional Chinese theater which combines singing, reciting, performing, acrobatics acting, and instrumental accompanying, along with rich face make-up, costume, and stage setting. I applied the pitch material drawn from the fixed instrumental accompanying pattern, the rhythmic material and tone color from percussion ensemble performance, to compose the theme and its development. By contrasting the legato phrases and staccato phrases, altering the rhythm, and employing various dynamics, I attempted to depict the contrast between majestic male roles and delicate female roles.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Lu Wang's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot New York Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Alan Gilbert

Date of reading: 06/03/2014

WANG, Xi

Symphony No. 1

2010

11:50

Xi WANG

Symphony No. 1

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 11:50

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.pno.str

About Composer:

Xi Wang has been considered as one of the most talented and active composers of her generation. Her music has been widely performed in the United States and abroad. Her orchestral music has been performed by the Minnesota Orchestra, the Atlanta Symphony, the Shanghai Philharmonic and the Spokane Symphony, to name a few.

Xi Wang has received five prizes from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). Her music has been spotlighted on Minnesota Public Radio, Aspen Public Radio and Radio-China. She was the sole recipient of the 2006-2007 Robbins Family Prize in Music Composition for her exceptional merit and promise as a composer at Cornell University.  Xi Wang was also one of the eight young composers featured in the project, New Voices from China, at the Bard College. Her other awards include: the first prize of the Fourth International Jurgenson Competition for Young Composers; the Tsang-Houei Hsu International Music Composition Award; the fifth edition of Northridge Composition Prize; the first prize of the ""Music from China"" International Composition Competition; the first prize of the ""Ensemble X"" competition, the University of Missouri-Kansas City Chamber Music Composition Competition Award and the Outstanding Student Studying Abroad Award from the Chinese Government. As a conductor, Xi Wang has conducted a number of premieres of her own compositions as well as the music by her colleagues. She performs as a piano soloist as well as a chamber music pianist.

About Piece:

On May 12, 2008, the Great Sichuan Earthquake killed around 70,000 people in China. About 380,000 people are injured and more than 18,000 were missing. The deadly earthquake left thousands and thousands orphans, widows, and widower. Homes were gone and hearts were broken…

I was living in Manhattan at that time. Bearing with the pressure of finishing my dissertation for my DMA from Cornell University, I could not help watching the news with watering eyes. The beautiful May and bustling Manhattan aggravated my grief to the lives lost in the earthquake.    

Symphony No. 1 will be a three-movement work. 

5/21/2010

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Xi Wang's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Jose Serebrier

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

WANG, Jie

Symphony No. 1, Awakening

2009

15:00

Jie WANG

Symphony No. 1, Awakening

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 15:00

Instrumentation:

2333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Wang Jie was born and raised in Shanghai during the economic expansion that followed the Cultural Revolution. In 2000, she moved to the United States to begin composition studies at the Manhattan School of Music, where she received her Master’s degree in composition, graduating with honors in May 2007. She is currently enrolled in the Artist Diploma program at the Curtis Institute of Music, where she studies with Richard Danielpour. Her compositions have been performed across the United States, Asia, and Europe. Her career highlights includes: the curtain raiser for Museum of Modern Art “Summer-Gardens”; VOX by New York City Opera; Opening ceremony of Beijing Modern Music Festival; a solo concert produced by Music-Theatre Group, and a recent nomination for the 2009 Berlin Prize. She held fellowships and residencies from the Aspen Music Festival, the Curtis Institute of Music, The Banff Centre, The Hermitage, and most recently the first composer awarded the Milton Rock Fellowship. She received honors and generous support from organizations such as ASCAP (Morton Gould Young Composer), BMI Foundation, American Music Center, Opera America, Music-Theatre Group, Atlantic Center for the Arts, the Curtis Institute of Music, the Manhattan School of Music, the Northridge Composition Prize, among others. 

About Piece:

Wang describes Symphony No. 1, Awakening as her most personal work, a journey from yearning and tempest to peace. Agile and powerful, the piece explores a full spectrum of emotions.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jie Wang's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Jose Serebrier

Date of reading: 05/07/2009

WANG, Yucong (Zoe)

Blackbird

2017

4:50

Yucong (Zoe) WANG

Blackbird

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 4:50

Instrumentation:

3333.4231.timp.3perc.harp.str.

About Composer:

Yucong (Zoe) Wang (b. 1993) began studying piano at age six and composition when she was 11. In 2011, she entered the Shanghai Conservatory as the top-ranked student, studying composition with Professor Gang Chen and Professor Huang Lv. In 2013, she entered the Eastman School of Music to pursue a B.M. in composition. Wang’s compositions have been performed at many concerts in Shanghai, at the Eastman School of Music, the George Eastman House, the Strong National Museum, and the University of Oregon. In 2016, she collaborated with the Deviant Septet, and her piece, The Ecstasy of Six Persian Poems, was performed by the septet at the Warren and Patricia Benson Forum on Creativity. In the same year, she was commissioned to write a piece for the 2016 Toy Hall of Fame at the Strong National Museum. Her past composition awards include second prize in the Confucius Award Composition Competition (2009) for her Chinese instrumental trio, Yi, and first prize in the Young Promise Composition Competition (2011) for her mixed quintet, The Reverse of 12 Hours. She also received the Eastman School’s Belle Gitleman award in 2016 for her chamber pieces, Five Wright Songs and The Ecstasy of Six Persian Poems.

About Piece:

The documentary Le peuple migrateur directed by Jacques Perrin instigated my inspiration to write this piece. I was fascinated by its depiction of the movements of birds, and struck by the power of nature that dominates all creatures. During the writing process of the piece, I did not have any specific breed of bird in mind. Only after I finished it, one of my best friends suggested the title Blackbird, not referring to the specific breed, but rather the bird that exists in the Ancient Chinese Mythology. The piece has two movements.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/23/2017

TRUDEL, Marianne

La Promesse

2011

8:12

Marianne TRUDEL

La Promesse

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 8:12

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.2perc.pno.str

About Composer:

Marianne Trudel is a multi-talented pianist, composer, improvisor, and arranger. At once energetic and passionate, her music cross-cuts a wide swath of musical interests. As a performer, she pursues an active career in a variety of settings ranging from solo performance to more intimate duos and trios, and larger groups as quintet, septet and large ensembles. She has played in Canada, United States and France.

She has published 4 recordings under her name: Espoir et autre pouvoirs- Marianne Trudel Septet (2011), L’embarquée- Duo Trudel-Bourbonnais (2009), Sands of Time (Live), Marianne Trudel Quintet (2007) and Espaces libres, solo piano (2005). Recipient of the Prix Étoiles Galaxie de Radio-Canada (Montreal Jazz Festival 2007), Marianne Trudel has presented multiple artistic projects that not only bring her considerable skills to the fore but also her keen sense of creativity.

She has shared the stage with, among others : Mark Feldman, Tony Malaby, Evan Parker, Mark Dresser, Kenny Wheeler, George Lewis, Chucho Valdes, Muhal Richard Abrams, René Lussier, and Charles Aznavour. She has composed and arranged for the radio of Radio-Canada, the ensemble OktoEcho, the Henri Mancini Institute Orchestra (Los Angeles, California), the McGill Jazz Orchestra, as well as scoring for short films.

Her previous studies have included a Master in Ethnomusicology (Université de Montréal), a Bachelor in Jazz Performance (McGill University), and numerous workshops in North America and Europe.

Next June / July, the Marianne Trudel Septet will be touring across Canada promoting her brand new cd : Espoir et autres pouvoirs (Effendi records).

About Piece:

The element of surprise in music is of paramount importance to me. As a composer and improviser a degee of uncertainty is a fundamental requirement in any musical performance. La Promesse, is my attempt to create a composition that will enable performers to yield a different interpretation at each performance, yet never at the expense of its basic identity and overall form. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

TONOOKA, Sumi

Full Circle

2013

9:10

Sumi TONOOKA

Full Circle

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 9:10

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Sumi Tonooka (pronounced To-NO-ka) has been called a “fierce and fascinating composer and pianist” (Jazz Times), “provocative and compelling” (New York Times), and “continually inventive, original, surprising, and a total delight,” (Cuadranos de Jazz, Madrid).
Noted jazz critic Francis Davis, one of the first to recognize her as an extraordinary talent, placed Sumi Tonooka “among the best of today's young pianists."" During a career now spanning more than 20 years that has taken her from Philadelphia to Boston and then to New York City, Sumi Tonooka has been surprising and delighting audiences -- and quietly piling up accolades from jazz writers and her fellow musicians. Working in trio or quartet with such noted jazz stalwarts as bassist Rufus Reid and drummers Akira Tana and Lewis Nash, Tonooka's recordings characteristically blend her own compositions with highly personal readings of jazz standards. Her recent quartet recording, Initiation (2009, ARC Records, with tenor saxophonist Erica Lindsay), garnered an “Honorable Mention” the 2010 Village Voice Jazz Critics' Poll.
Her most recent CD, Now, was released in Febuary 2012 to international acclaim. A recent review from Lucidculture  http://lucidculture.wordpress.com/2012/07/03/sumi proclaimed her work “unselfconsciously brilliant”, “an utterly original player” “Grounded in the blues but with a flair for the unexpected and an ear for the avant garde”

Recent activities include a solo recital at the Earshot Jazz Festival in Seattle Wa, on Oct 29th 2102,  recorded live for Jim Wilkes syndicated show Jazz NorthWest on NPR.

In August 2012, Sumi received the honor to attend the Jazz Composers Orchestra Intensive, a program which brought together 38 jazz composers at various stages of their careers chosen from a national pool of applicants, to explore the challenges of writing for the symphony orchestra. Composers working in jazz, improvised and creative music have been selected based on their excellent musicianship, originality and potential for future growth in orchestral composition. Sumi recently received word that she will move further in the program and her orchestra piece will receive a reading in early June 2013 in NYC by the American Composers Orchestra.
In addition to her jazz recording and performing, she has composed for award-winning films. She is also featured in an upcoming full-length documentary from Citygate Films on the youngest victims of HIV/AIDS in Africa. She tours as part of a sextet featuring her musical compadre of two decades, jazz violinist John Blake, Jr.  A Note of Hope, is set for wide release in 2013.
Tonooka's career has been chronicled on several highly regarded jazz books, including Living the Jazz Life by Royal Stokes, ln The Moment by Francis Davis, and Madame Jazz by Leslie Gourse (all on Oxford University Press).
As a professional response to an inherent void within the music industry, Tonooka, along with alto saxophonist Chris Burnett and tenor saxophonist Erica Lindsay, co-founded the ARTISTS RECORDING COLLECTIVE (ARC), an internationally recognized brand and professional recording label. She now divides her time between her responsibilities as the Chief, Public Relations Officer for ARC, composing, teaching, and performing for an increasingly widespread audience of jazz aficionados who have discovered her wide-ranging talents.

About Piece:

My idea for Full Circle was inspired by a dream I had after attending the Intensive, about orchestrating the curve in the yin and yang sign. After laughing it off at first I started to wonder what would that sound like? Thinking about this led me to exploring the ideas in Full Circle. I want to create a six to eight minute work exploring circles. I want them to intersect, break, return and join together. The melodic material is circular in construct. The rhythm will have a feeling of unpredictibility, surprise and flow as in jazz improvisation. Regarding form, rather then planning out the exact way the piece will unfold, I want to allow my skills as an jazz musician/improvisior to guide me, using intuition, curiosity, ignition and openess to help steer the piece to its conclusion. In creating this piece, I want to deal musically with opposing and circular life dynamics, the sweet and the sour, the yin and the yang. It is my goal to create new music for the orchestral community that would reflect, fuse and explore my experience as a jazz pianist and composer in new ways

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Sumi Tonooka's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Oliver Hagen

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

TIMOFEEV, Alexander

Fantasme for Orchestra

2017

17:07

Alexander TIMOFEEV

Fantasme for Orchestra

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 17:07

Instrumentation:

3*33*3*.4331.tomp.3perc.harp.str

About Composer:

Alexander Timofeev (b. 1983) debuted as a composer at age 19 performing his Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (2003) with the National Philharmonic Orchestra of Moldova. He premiered his works at the Thailand International Composition Festival, Hariclea Darclee Festival and Voice Competition (Romania), Oxford Piano Festival (UK), Novye Imena (Russia), Northern Lights Festival (USA) and received awards for his compositions at Sergey Slonimsky International Competition (Russia), Valasske Mezirici International Festival and Cimbalom Competition (Czech Republic), and Carl Filtsch International Competition (Romania). He is the winner of the 2016 Richard Weerts Composition Competition, and a finalist of the 2016 Thailand International Composition Festival. His recent premieres include Five Songs on Poems by Agnesa Rosca for Soprano and Piano (2015), Concerto for Two Pianos and Chamber Orchestra (2014), and Concerto for Cimbalom and Orchestra (2013). His compositions have been broadcast on WQXR and presented in live performances on Pro TV (Romania) and Tele-Radio Moldova. In 2008 Timofeev founded the International Society of Pianists and Composers (ispci.org), a non-profit organization that promotes contemporary music written for piano. Started as a creative circle of composers and performers, graduates of the Eastman School of Music, it now represents a growing network of musicians from over 20 countries. Alexander Timofeev completed his D.M.A. at the University of Maryland, College Park. He holds an M.M. from the Eastman School of Music and a B.M. from Rowan University. He studied composition with Lawrence Moss, Harold Oliver and Zlata Tkach. Timofeev currently resides in Philadelphia; he is an Artist-in-Residence at Rowan University.

About Piece:

“Through our ears, the universe is listening to its harmonies.” This quote by the British philosopher Alan Watts can inspire us to love and appreciate music in all its forms. We subconsciously experience joy when we hear music - an act that comforts us in the lonely, dark universe. Once I had experienced such joy when I heard a melody by Mozart. I immediately realized that I found an idea that ignited my senses and feelings. In order to give this musical thought a new perspective, I began to disintegrate it into basic elements from which I could build a new meaning. The result was Fantasme - a sequence of contrasting musical images, an emotional journey that could take the listener in an unexpected direction.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/23/2017

TEMKIN, Daniel

Regenerations

2010

13:00

Daniel TEMKIN

Regenerations

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 13:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Daniel Temkin is currently a graduate fellow at the New England Conservatory.  One of his earliest compositions, “The Realm of Solitude,” was premiered in Alice Tully Hall, and many of his works have been performed professionally across the United States.  In 2010, Daniel will have pieces premiered by the UNLV Brass Ensemble, and the Rutgers Symphony Orchestra.  Daniel is a Theodore Presser Scholar and the recipient of a 2009 ASCAPLUS! Award.
Originally a percussionist, Daniel has performed on numerous occasions with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s Chamber Ensemble, and the Mostly Mozart Festival’s Riverside Choral Society.  He has played chamber music with Sarah Chang and Orli Shaham, and worked under David Zinman, James Conlon, and Leonard Slatkin.  An alumnus of the Eastern, Brevard, and Aspen Music Festivals, Daniel studied percussion with She-e Wu, Chris Deviney, and Jonathan Haas.  He has studied composition with Michael Gandolfi, Charles Fussell, Kevin Puts, Robert Aldridge, and Sydney Hodkinson.

About Piece:

"Regenerations (2007-2008) is a colorful work for full symphonic orchestra in which a simple five note motive becomes the basis for nine contrasting variations.  Throughout the piece, the musical elements stated in the first variation are continually intertwined and developed to create an evolving sonic tapestry.  In the midst of this regenerating musical material listeners will be exposed to many different textures.  At the opening long brass lines are placed upon gentle string chords, while in other sections wind chorales and canonic lines slowly build to form rich polyphonic textures.  In the most energized moments long singing lines in the woodwinds and brass are placed on top of rapid pulsations in the strings, while the harp, piano, and a large percussion section are continually utilized to augment the orchestra’s colors.  

Overall the work slowly evolves, winding in and out of various musical regions and exploring different areas of harmonic stability and musical tension.  Only at the very end of the piece do the musical ideas finally come into full counterpoint with one another, at which point the evolution of the regenerating motives stops and the piece builds to a final, triumphant, tutti ending.
"

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Daniel Temkin's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Nashville Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Giancarlo Guerrero

Date of reading: 04/07/2010

TAYLOR, Benjamin

Leaving White

2012

11:45

Benjamin TAYLOR

Leaving White

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 11:45

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Benjamin Taylor, a trumpeter and pianist performs with and writes music for a variety of chamber ensembles, jazz combos and big bands, wind bands, choirs, and experimental ensembles. A large part of Taylor's music includes electroacoustics. His music has been performed at many music festivals including the Society of Electroacoustic Music in the United States National Conference, Spark Festival of Electronic Music and Arts, Society of Composers National Conference, Noisefloor Festival, Electronic Music Midwest, Electroacoustic Barn Dance, New Music Hartford Four Seasons Concert Series, Gamma-UT New Music Festival and international jazz festivals in Edinburgh, Wigan, Marlborough and Birmingham. Taylor’s prizes and honors include a 2011 BMI Student Composers Award, a Barlow Endowment Commission, a 2011 ASCAP Young Jazz Composer Award, First Place Winner of the 2008 SCI/ASCAP Student Composition Competition (Region VII), First Place Co-winner of the 2008 International Society of Bassist’s Composition Competition (media division), and First Place in the 2009 Vera Hinckley Mayhew Creative Arts Composition Contest.  Taylor recently started his doctoral studies at Indiana University (Bloomington).

About Piece:

In one Chinese tradition of painting, the artists intentionally leave large blank spaces in their renditions of natural landscapes. The blank spaces are intended to grant the viewers more room in using their imaginations. Now I know what you're thinking - but don't worry - I didn't compose this piece with large, silent spaces, leaving the listeners to imagine their own music. The title, Leaving White, refers instead to my own experience writing this piece. As a composer, I have found inspiration for my music in a variety of places: photography, life experiences, traffic signs, the periodic table of elements, and even internet search engines. But with this piece my compositional process was much different. I consciously tried to remove all extra-musical associations from my mind in order to leave my mind blank; thus leaving white.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/02/2012

TAYLOR, Matthew Evan

Three Glorious Days

2014

6:45

Matthew Evan TAYLOR

Three Glorious Days

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 6:45

Instrumentation:

3233.4331.timp+2.hrp.cel.str

About Composer:

As an artist, composer/saxophonist Matthew Evan Taylor (December 3, 1980), is intrigued by four
aspects of music; the growth of complex music from a simple idea, the social nature of the art form
(especially, as it manifests in improvisation and the audience’s reaction), the evocation of color and
atmosphere through sound, and the relationship of dance and music. He believes that today’s culture
encourages a new kinetic, vibrant type of art, with unhinged rhythms and unbridled expression. It is
Matthew’s goal to reflect this world and what is awe-inspiring about it through his music. Ultimately, he
wishes to connect with the audience and expose the beauty that is all around.
An avid admirer of the arts, Matthew has been involved in forward looking and exciting multidisciplinary
collaborations. Currently, he, dancer/choreographer Priscilla Marrero, and visual/performance artist
Ferrán Martín are blazing new trails as the new art ensemble [ce n’est pas nous] (not us). Their piece,
the Emerald house, was recently premiered at Inkub8 and presented in concert in Paris, France as part
of the Cinejazz International Film and Music festival. Other collaborations have included work with
percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani, avant-garde composer and multi-instrumentalist Elliott Sharp, artist Pablo
Cano, dancers Katherine Kramer

About Piece:

"Three Glorious Days was inspired by the guillotine gesture in ""Marche au supplice"" from
Symphonie fantastique by Hector Berlioz. The piece is named after the period of upheaval in
France also known as the July Revolution. Incidentally, this event took place the same year that
Berlioz completed fantastique, 1830. This particular ""revolution"" removed one royal family in
favor of another, so not greatly changing the status quo–there would be another revolution in
1848. I wrote this piece during the 2012 presidential election, which had interesting parallels
with the Three Glorious Days: President Obama's legitimacy was questioned and there was a
growing dissatisfaction with the distribution of wealth. In the end, like the July Revolution, there
was no real, great upheaval, just a return to an uneasy truce..."

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Detroit Symphony Orchestra Classical Roots Readings

Conductor: Leonard Slatkin

Date of reading: 03/09/2014

SUSSMAN, Richard

Convergence

2013

9:55

Richard SUSSMAN

Convergence

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 9:55

Instrumentation:

2*2*2*2.2221.timp+2.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Richard Sussman is an accomplished jazz pianist, composer, synthesist, and educator.
His varied career as a performer has included performances and/or recordings with such
diverse artists as Lionel Hampton, Randy Brecker, Lee Konitz, Buddy Rich, Blood Sweat &
Tears, David Sanborn, Marty Balin, Country Joe McDonald, Carly Simon, and Donna
Summer. His jazz discography includes four albums of original music as a leader, including
the critically acclaimed ""Free Fall"" (Double-Time Records) and “Live At Sweet Rhythm”
(Origin Records). Richard recently completed a new studio recording with his quintet
featuring Randy Brecker-tpt & flg hrn, Jerry Bergonzi-tnr sx, Mike Richmond-bs, Jeff
Williams-dr, and Richard-pno & synthesizer. The new recording, entitled “Continuum”, was
released in June 2012 on Origin Records, and features original compositions by Richard.

About Piece:

The underlying impetus behind “Convergence” comes from the incredible diversity of sounds and musical styles with which we are surrounded in the 21st century. The “convergence” of these diverse musical genres results in the breaking down of seemingly artificial stylistic barriers that tend to inhibit interdisciplinary compositional experimentation. Through this coalescence of  disparate elements, “Convergence” seeks to bring a sense of the spontaneity, energy, and rhythmic drive of jazz improvisation and urban pop music to the orchestra.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

SULLIVAN, Tim

Polychrome

2009

13:55

Tim SULLIVAN

Polychrome

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 13:55

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Tim Sullivan is a recent graduate of the University of Michigan, where he studied composition with Bright Sheng, Andrew Mead, William Bolcom, Betsy Jolas and Karen Tanaka.  He also holds degrees from the University of Northern Colorado, where he studied with Robert Ehle and John McLaird.  His compositions have been performed throughout the U.S. at various venues and new music festivals, including the American Opera Projects, 2008 NASA Conference, Etcetera Festival of New Music, and World Saxophone Congress XIII.  He has received awards from ASCAP, Downbeat magazine, and ALEA III, and has published essays on the music of Alfred Schnittke and György Ligeti.  At present, Tim is on the music theory faculty at the Crane School of Music in Potsdam, NY.

About Piece:

Polychrome literally means “being of many or various colors” – in this work, I wanted to explore this idea in a dramatic context.  The “colors” of the work are bold and bright, and often come together in explosive combinations.  In a formal sense, I fashioned the work out of shifting blocks of music.  The first half of Polychrome features the alternation of two contrasting colors: the first is dazzling and bright, while the second is coarse and dark.  With each return, the “color” of the music is shaded differently, like it is being viewed through a prism.  After one final flash of brilliance, a shrieking chord in the woodwinds and strings signifies the beginning of the second half of the work.  There are two “primary” colors in this section as well: bold, dramatic chords, which gradually migrate from the woodwinds to the whole orchestra; and a softer hue introduced by the lyrical oboe solo and hushed string chords.  Gradually, these colors are brought together, and the climax of the work occurs where the roles become reversed – the music of the oboe solo is exploded into cacophonous bursts of woodwinds and strings, and the whole orchestra collapses onto a single note.  After these incredibly violent collisions, the music fades away into slow, sustained echoes of earlier sounds.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Tim Sullivan's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Colorado Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Fergus MacLeod

Date of reading: 07/17/2009

STARK, Christopher

Ignatian Exercises

2010

10:35

Christopher STARK

Ignatian Exercises

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 10:35

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.pno.str

About Composer:

Christopher Stark is a composer deeply rooted in the American West. Having spent his formative years in rural western Montana, his music is always seeking to capture the expansive energy of this quintessential American landscape.
 Christopher's music has been performed in venues across the world from the Neue Synagoge Berlin to Carnegie Hall. He has worked with ensembles such as Brave New Works, the CCM Philharmonia, the Momenta Quartet, the Israeli Chamber Project, Janus Trio, NeXT Ens, the Tipping Point Saxophone Quartet, Juventas!, the CCM Wind Symphony, and the orchestra and wind ensemble at Cornell University.
 Festivals and courses which Christopher has attended include the 2010 Buffalo Philharmonic Young Composers Forum, the 2010 Dinosaur Annex Young Composers Festival, the 2009 Composers Conference at Wellesley College, the Music09 Festival in Blonay, Switzerland, the 2008 FUBiS Summer Composition Course in Berlin, and the 2005 Oregon Bach Festival.
 Christopher currently studies music composition as a doctoral student at Cornell University. His current teachers are Roberto Sierra and Steven Stucky. Christopher has previously studied at the Freie Universität Berlin, the Cincinnati Conservatory, and the University of Montana. At these institutions and abroad in Vienna, he studied with notable composers Samuel Adler, Michael Fiday, Joel Hoffman, David Maslanka, Charles Nichols, Wolfram Wagner and Patrick Williams

About Piece:

Ignatian Exercises is a reference to two things: first, the famous Catholic Spiritual Exercises penned by the basque saint and founder of the Society of Jesus, Ignacio de Loyola, and second, the town of my birth, St. Ignatius, Montana. I stumbled upon the Spiritual Exercises while I was researching the early cultures of western Montana. From this research, I discovered the long and dark history of St. Ignatius, and more specifically, the heartbreaking and disgraceful conflict between the early Catholic settlers and the Bitterroot Salish, Kootenai, and Pend d'Oreilles tribes.
Inspired to think more deeply about this conflict, I decided to write a work drawing inspiration from my memories of St. Ignatius, my Catholic upbringing, and the pan-tribal culture of the Flathead Indian Reservation. The music acts as a descent into these memories and moves quickly from idea to idea, as if trying to conjure up these distant impressions. Some of the ideas are murky, some are crystalline, but all try to represent a distinct memory from my youth. These memories are continually interrupted by an antagonistic D-natural, which slowly bends in and out of tune. This is meant to represent the idea of inevitability: the inevitable loss of memory, the inevitable destruction of the western landscape, and the inevitable loss of the native cultures.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Jose Serebrier

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

STAFYLAKIS, Harry

Brittle Fracture

2014

6:50

Harry STAFYLAKIS

Brittle Fracture

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 6:50

Instrumentation:

2222*.2231.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Haralabos [ Harry ] Stafylakis (Montreal, b. 1982) is a Canadian-American composer based in New York City.  His concert music strives for dramatic emotional and intellectual expression, integrating idioms drawn from classical and popular styles.  With an intimate background in progressive metal and traditional Greek music, Stafylakis has developed a unique conception of musical temporality and rhythm, infusing his compositions with a characteristic vitality and drive.

Stafylakis's works have been performed internationally by the Israel Chamber Orchestra, McGill Symphony Orchestra, International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Mivos Quartet, Cadillac Moon Ensemble, Cygnus Ensemble, Alea III, Lorelei Ensemble, Architek Percussion, and American Modern Ensemble.  He has been featured at festivals and conferences including Composers Now, New Music on the Point, Providence Premieres, Aries Composers Festival, SCI, THEMUS, EAMA, York Guitar Festival, Cluster, and the Montreal International Classical Guitar Festival. 

Awards include the Charles Ives Fellowship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and four SOCAN Foundation Awards for Young Composers.  Stafylakis has received commissions and grants from the Canada Council for the Arts, soprano Sharon Azrieli-Perez, guitarists Patrick Kearney and Tariq Harb, Architek Percussion, Lorelei Ensemble, and McGill Sax Quartet.  As of 2013 he is composer-in-residence with the contemporary dance group Untitled|Collective, collaborating with choreographer Ian RT Colless. 

About Piece:

Brittle Fracture attempts to depict this type of structural failure in musical terms.  Inspired by modulation and temporal manipulation techniques commonly employed in pop music production, the piece is based on a simple four-note piano theme that is performed as if it were being processed through an echo unit.  The piano’s resulting spectral content is selectively captured, extended, and transformed by the orchestral instruments, effectuating a long-range rhythmic, melodic, registral, articulative, and dynamic intensification.  Throughout this textural crescendo, the music undergoes various types and degrees of stress that attempt to disrupt the constant musical flow.  At the peak of the process the music finally buckles under its own weight, causing an abrupt rupture in the structure. A series of these fractures occurs, slicing between two contrasting musical surfaces until the inevitable and complete dissolution of their constituent materials.
This work was originally composed as a work for chamber orchestra (18 players) in 2013 as part of a residency with the CUNY Graduate Center’s Contemporary Music Ensemble. It received its premiere in that form on May 8, 2013 in Elebash Hall, New York, with Whitney E. George conducting. Brittle Fracture has been awarded a 2013 Sir Ernest MacMillan Award by the SOCAN Foundation.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

SOPER, Kate

Entre les Calanques

2011

6:30

Kate SOPER

Entre les Calanques

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 6:30

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.4perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Kate Soper is New York City-based composer and performer with a diverse background. Her
current compositional interests include the integration of drama and rhetoric into musical structure,
the transformation of visceral gestures in and out of time, and the potential of the human voice to
communicate abstractly (or not). Kate's music, described as ""exquisitely quirky"" by the New York
Times, has been played by ensembles such as the Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, Ensemble Linea, the
BUTI Wind Orchestra, Dinosaur Annex, the Second Instrumental Unit, and the Due East
Ensemble, and she has received awards and commissions from the Fromm Foundation, the
American Academy of Arts and Letters, the Music Theory Society of New York State, Carnegie
Hall, the Tanglewood Music Center, and the Yarn/Wire Ensemble, among others. Recent and
upcoming works include SIREN, a mini-opera for three voices and piano, Circuit-Breaker for bass
trombone and orchestra, and The Door in the Wall, a commission from the Nouvel Ensemble
Moderne to be premiered in summer 2011. As a singer with experience in Western Classical and
Indian Carnatik music, pop music, and improvisation, she performs frequently as a new music
soprano in her own work and in the works of others. Kate received her Bachelors of Music from
Rice University and is currently a DMA candidate at Columbia University, where her teachers have
included Fred Lerdahl, Mario Davidovksy, Tristan Murail, and Fabien Lévy. She is Managing
Director and vocalist for Wet Ink, a new music ensemble dedicated to uncompromising
performances of adventurous music across aesthetic boundaries.

About Piece:

A calanque is like an inlet, a land mass that juts out into a body of water. Frequent hikes among these formations in Southern France gave rise to a strange phenomenological effect: I was often flattened by a vertigo-inducing view of dizzying cliffs careening lines the more I stared. Entre les Calanques is, in part, an attempt to record this pull and push of space and the simultaneous perceptions of rushing movement and static tableau. More abstractly, it is an orchestral excercise in growth - upwards and downwards, outwards and inwards 0 and collapse.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Kate Soper's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/04/2011

SMITH, Nathan

The Wyoming Matter

2016

9:00

Nathan SMITH

The Wyoming Matter

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

A native of Northern California, Nathan Parker Smith is an active performer and composer currently residing in Brooklyn, New York. In 2009, he formed the "Nathan Parker Smith Large Ensemble," an eighteen-member ensemble regularly performing original music throughout New York, including recent performances shows at Fat Cat, Spike Hill, Cameo, the Tea Lounge, Shapeshifter Lab, and the Greene Space at WNYC. 

About Piece:

My piece is entitled The Wyoming Matter, named after a bizarre and widely unknown incident in the ports of New York during the 1940’s. My goal in writing this piece is to both experiment with the musical ideas and techniques discussed during the summer intensive, and to write for this new unfamiliar instrumentation while attempting to maintain my own voice and style. The first minute begins with great intensity and dissonance and is very densely orchestrated and establishes most of the harmonic and melodic material that will be used in the entire composition. The main theme appears in different duet groupings after this exposition and the piece mellows. The middle section of the composition will feature much lighter orchestration, but will eventually return to the intensity of the beginning. At the end a slower tempo begins. My plan is to continue with similar melodic material using the juxtaposition of duple and triple meters to set up a groove. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Nathan Smith's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute Readings Naples

Conductor: Yaniv Segal

Date of reading: 05/26/2016

SMALL, Michael

Eastern Point

2016

7:45

Michael SMALL

Eastern Point

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 7:45

Instrumentation:

2*222*.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Michael Small’s works often draw on visual or literary sources and seek to place the listener’s imaginative journey at the heart of the work’s narrative. Dreams, hallucinations, memory, flight, and surreal landscapes are recurring themes.
In 2014, Michael received the Alan Horne prize from the Royal Philharmonic Society as part of their annual Young Composer commissions. White Space for violin solo was written for UK violinist Fenella Humphreys and premiered at the Presteigne Festival in August 2015; it has also received performances in Bristol Oxford and Liverpool, and is programmed in London as well as the National Galleries of Art in Edinburgh, before a painting by the artist who inspired the work. Michael’s piece for the Momenta Quartet, Memory Palace received its New York premiere in October 2015. Upcoming pieces include a new Oboe Quartet and another new violin solo work based on Virginia Woolf’s timeless novel, The Waves.
Michael received a BMus (Hons) from the Royal Northern College of Music and studied with David Horne, before moving the United States to study with Steven Stucky at Cornell University.

About Piece:

Eastern Point is a short orchestral study based on the late seascapes of Winslow Homer. Though there were many of these twelve or so paintings which inspired this piece in some way, I focused specifically on two – one called West Point, Prout’s Neck and the one which gave this piece it’s title, Eastern Point.
The piece evokes both the somber mood of the latter, all the while on an inexorable trajectory towards an ecstatic burst of spray – suggested by the cycle of visual activity in the former painting – a central gulf into which the viewer feels “pulled”, and then flung out in one of Homer’s characteristic powerful crashing waves.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Michael Small's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

SIMON, Carlos

Plagues of Egypt

2016

7:50

Carlos SIMON

Plagues of Egypt

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 7:50

Instrumentation:

3233.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Carlos Simon, a versatile composer, arranger and musician, combines the in?uences of jazz, gospel, and neo-romanticism in his music. Simon was named the winner of the 2015 Marvin Hamlisch Film Scoring Contest. Serving as music director and keyboardist for GRAMMY Award winner Jennifer Holliday, Simon has performed with the Boston Pops Symphony, Jackson Symphony, and the St. Louis Symphony. Mr. Simon is currently earning his doctorate degree at the University of Michigan, where he has studied with Michael Daugherty and Evan Chambers. Simon received his Master’s Degree at Georgia State University studying with Nickitas Demos and earned his Bachelors Degree at Morehouse College studying with Robert Tanner. In 2011, Simon was on faculty at Morehouse college, teaching music theory. For the 2015-2016 season, Carlos Simon will serve as the young composer in-residence for the Detroit Chamber Strings and Winds.

About Piece:

As the son of a preacher, I grew up hearing the exciting stories of the Bible. Plagues of Egypt is the ?rst of several pieces that will be apart of a larger work entitled, Bible Stories. The goal of this piece is to recount the tale from the point of view of the Pharaoh, who stubbornly holds the freedom of the Jewish people. With the entrance of each plague, light metallic sounds of the harp, celeste and percussion are coupled with static strings depicting the spirit of God. From the frogs and boils to the swarm of pestilence, Pharaoh refuses let the Jewish people go. Two heavy jabs are used in the orchestra throughout the entirety of the piece to show Pharaoh’s “hardened heart”. It is only with the “Angel of Death” which takes the life of Pharaoh’s ?rst born child that these motions are climaxed with his despair. The jabs are eventually broken down to single instruments by the conclusion as his stubbornness is brought to a desperate whimper.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Carlos Simon's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

SCOTT, Kevin

A Point Served...(In Remembrance Arthur Ashe)

2014

14:15

Kevin SCOTT

A Point Served...(In Remembrance Arthur Ashe)

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 14:15

Instrumentation:

2*.22*2.3221.3perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Born in the Bronx and raised in Manhattan’s Harlem section, the music of Kevin Scott has been performed by numerous American orchestras, and was the recipient of the 1992 Detroit Symphony/Unisys African American Composers' Forum award.

Scott’s interest in composition was kindled while he was attending Christopher Columbus High School, educating himself in composition that ensued in readings of his first compositions by the school's orchestra and band. Upon graduation in 1974, Scott began formal lessons in composition with John Corigliano and Ulysses Kay at Herbert H. Lehman College in the Bronx, and continued his studies at the Mannes College of Music with Christine Berl and David Tcimpidis, in addition to conducting with Yakov Kreizberg.

In 1984, Scott's emergence on the national scene occurred when his Fanfare G.A.F.: An American Overture was premiered by the Queens Philharmonic, which led to a series of commissions from the Brooklyn Philharmonic and Queens Symphony through the New York State Council on the Arts. In 1989, Scott was appointed resident composer for the RAPP Arts Center in Manhattan, writing scores for various theatrical productions including Thomas A. Ditsch's Ben-Hur and new adaptations of Chekov's The Sea Gull and Uncle Vanya.

About Piece:

When the world of tennis lost Arthur Ashe to AIDS in February of 1993, it lost not only one of the sport’s finest players, but also a role model for African-Americans, a man who publicly fought racism and other obstacles to achieve his goal in his chosen profession. Moved by his untimely passing, I decided to compose a work in remembrance of his participation in tennis, as well as his role in the civil rights movement, his quiet dignity and his internal struggle with the disease that took his life.

Scored for an augmented chamber orchestra of winds in pairs, three horns, two trumpets, two trombones, tuba, two percussionists, harp, piano and strings, A point served... opens with a solo xylophone that serves as a figurative representation of the game, which is soon joined by the vibraphone, harp and piano, its pointillistic musings underpinned by a long elegiac line in the strings spelling out Ashe’s name. This theme undulates into a metamorphic transformation within the orchestra, subtly manipulating and infusing the thematic material with chromatic and modal elements, while the winds and brass sections take up their own interpretation of a tennis game, their forces representing the strife and conflict that occurred during Ashe’s lifetime, building up to a climax before subsiding into a brief segment for string choir representing Ashe’s quiet personality in private, which is represented by the cello section and solo viola, before the final conflicts of his life return, sometimes heroic, sometimes tragic until the entire orchestra thunders in a fanfare-like section in which the song “We Shall Overcome” is alluded to in the brass, building to a climax before being abruptly cut off into silence, resuming with the xylophone playing the game, a final heroic sound from muted trumpets and a brief line of reflective eloquence from the English Horn and French Horn, subsiding into silence as the ball drops on the tennis court.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Kevin Scott's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Detroit Symphony Orchestra Classical Roots Readings

Conductor: Leonard Slatkin

Date of reading: 09/24/2014

SCHLOSBERG, Daniel

Grosse Concerto

2012

6:00

Daniel SCHLOSBERG

Grosse Concerto

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 6:00

Instrumentation:

3*33*3.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.hrpschd.str

About Composer:

Originally from Philadelphia, composer and pianist Daniel Schlosberg has had works premiered by the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Encompass New Opera Theater, counter)induction, the Lorelei Ensemble, and New Triad for Collaborative Arts. Five Stuck, his first work for large orchestra, was commissioned and premiered by the Yale Symphony Orchestra in October 2010, and his chamber opera, A Country Doctor, was premiered in a semi-staged version in March 2009. Current projects include a new music-theater piece for the Yale Cabaret and the New Morse Code Ensemble. Piano performances have included Samuel Barber’s Piano Concerto and Alexander Scriabin’s Prometheus with the Yale Symphony Orchestra, numerous new music events, and four solo recitals at Yale. In addition, he has a passion for music directing, conducting such operas and musicals as Hansel and Gretel, Dialogues of the Carmelites, L’enfant et les sortilèges, Carousel, and Sondheim’s Passion. Recently, he was the rehearsal pianist for Sondheim’s Follies at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. before its transfer to Broadway. Daniel has won awards from Yale, NFAA, and ASCAP. His choral piece Poor Richard’s Almanack Excerpts was performed by Singing City at the national celebration of Ben Franklin’s 300th birthday. He has appeared on From the Top, the Today Show, and in two PBS documentaries. Daniel is currently in his first year of a Master’s degree in composition at the Yale School of Music, studying with Aaron Jay Kernis and piano with Hung-Kuan Chen.

About Piece:

Grosse Concerto began as my personal struggle with the symphonic genre, and specifically the overwhelming body of work that is the German symphonic tradition. Given this genre’s de facto—and seemingly never-ending—status as the “pinnacle” of “Classical music,” I felt it was important to confront it head-on. The title alludes to the Baroque form of “concerto grosso” and serves as a metaphor for the entire piece, which is a kind of “big concerto” or “concerto for orchestra."

The work features a broad array of styles that waft in and out, as if having a conversation through time; I wish to explore the ways in which these seemingly disparate styles interact and form a cohesive musical narrative. A main theme in the full orchestra alternates with musical episodes played by subsections, in which are embedded solos for various instruments, creating a “concerto within a concerto”. Each of the episodes features music echoing a past time period, such as Baroque, jazz, and modernist pointillism. This adds up to what are often very sharp contrasts—there are several rapid shifts in the music, from one texture to another without any transition, like an abrupt cut between scenes in a film or a sudden change of lighting in a play.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/23/2012

SCHIMMEL, Carl

rite.apotheosis.

2011

8:55

Carl SCHIMMEL

rite.apotheosis.

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 8:55

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+2.hrp.str

About Composer:

Carl Schimmel is a composer based in Iowa and Illinois.  Praised by The New York Times as “vivid and dramatic,” his recent music is dense with literary and musical references, often humorous, and combines intensity of expression with a structural rigor which draws upon his mathematics background.  In infusing his music with extra-musical influences such as poetry, art, and even unusual words, he strives to construct nexuses of experience which reflect both the inner life of emotions and the outer physical world which shapes us and is shaped by us.

Winner of Columbia University’s Joseph Bearns Prize and the Lee Ettelson Award, Schimmel has received honors and awards from many organizations, including the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Copland House, New Music USA, and ASCAP.  His works have been performed in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Merkin Hall in New York, Severance Hall in Cleveland, the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, and at other venues throughout North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia.  He has received performances and commissions from the California EAR Unit, the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, the Minnesota Orchestra, North/South Consonance, saxophonist Taimur Sullivan, the Da Capo Chamber Players, Lucy Shelton, the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, and many others.  A graduate of Duke University (Ph.D.), the Yale School of Music (M.M.), and Case Western Reserve University (B.A. Mathematics and Music), he is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition at Illinois State University in Normal, IL.

Winner of Columbia University’s Joseph Bearns Prize and the 2010 Lee Ettelson Award, Carl Schimmel has received honors and awards from many organizations, including the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Copland House, the Seoul International Composition Competition, the National Federation of Music Clubs, the New York Youth Symphony First Music Awards, NACWPI, SCI, and ASCAP.  His works have been performed in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Merkin Hall in New York, Severance Hall in Cleveland, the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, and at other venues throughout North America, Europe, and Asia.  He has received performances and commissions from the California EAR Unit, the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, the Minnesota Orchestra, North/South Consonance, saxophonist Taimur Sullivan, bass clarinetist Henri Bok, Line C3 Percussion Ensemble, Cross Sound Music Festival, the Da Capo Chamber Players, Lucy Shelton, the Mexico City Woodwind Quintet, Flexible Music, counter)induction, and many others.  A graduate of Duke University (Ph.D. Music Composition) and the Yale School of Music (M.M. Music Composition), he is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition at Illinois State University in Normal, IL.  Please visit http://www.carlschimmel.com.

About Piece:

rite. apotheosis. is an experiment in (melo-?) drama.  The frenetic and exaggerated gestures in the work are typical of my recent music, and some have termed me an “expressionist.”  I frequently dabble in humor, but this work seems to have little of it – although the sparse “cha-cha-cha” sections are light and tiptoed; maybe they will make some in the audience smile.  The musical material is drawn from and moves across a special set of seven-note scales (major, harmonic minor, melodic minor, and quasi-octatonic).  But my building materials are less relevant than the emotional import of the music.  There is no plot to this music per se, but the title reflects the general narrative progression and shift of mood that takes place

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Carl Schimmel's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/09/2011

SCHIMMEL, Carl

Two Variations on Ascent into the Empyrean

2015

8:40

Carl SCHIMMEL

Two Variations on Ascent into the Empyrean

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 8:40

Instrumentation:

3*33*3.4331.timp+4.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Carl Schimmel is a composer based in Iowa and Illinois.  Praised by The New York Times as “vivid and dramatic,” his recent music is dense with literary and musical references, often humorous, and combines intensity of expression with a structural rigor which draws upon his mathematics background.  In infusing his music with extra-musical influences such as poetry, art, and even unusual words, he strives to construct nexuses of experience which reflect both the inner life of emotions and the outer physical world which shapes us and is shaped by us.

Winner of Columbia University’s Joseph Bearns Prize and the Lee Ettelson Award, Schimmel has received honors and awards from many organizations, including the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Copland House, New Music USA, and ASCAP.  His works have been performed in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Merkin Hall in New York, Severance Hall in Cleveland, the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, and at other venues throughout North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia.  He has received performances and commissions from the California EAR Unit, the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, the Minnesota Orchestra, North/South Consonance, saxophonist Taimur Sullivan, the Da Capo Chamber Players, Lucy Shelton, the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, and many others.  A graduate of Duke University (Ph.D.), the Yale School of Music (M.M.), and Case Western Reserve University (B.A. Mathematics and Music), he is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition at Illinois State University in Normal, IL.

Winner of Columbia University’s Joseph Bearns Prize and the 2010 Lee Ettelson Award, Carl Schimmel has received honors and awards from many organizations, including the MacDowell Colony, Yaddo, Copland House, the Seoul International Composition Competition, the National Federation of Music Clubs, the New York Youth Symphony First Music Awards, NACWPI, SCI, and ASCAP.  His works have been performed in Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Merkin Hall in New York, Severance Hall in Cleveland, the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, and at other venues throughout North America, Europe, and Asia.  He has received performances and commissions from the California EAR Unit, the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, the Minnesota Orchestra, North/South Consonance, saxophonist Taimur Sullivan, bass clarinetist Henri Bok, Line C3 Percussion Ensemble, Cross Sound Music Festival, the Da Capo Chamber Players, Lucy Shelton, the Mexico City Woodwind Quintet, Flexible Music, counter)induction, and many others.  A graduate of Duke University (Ph.D. Music Composition) and the Yale School of Music (M.M. Music Composition), he is currently Assistant Professor of Music Theory and Composition at Illinois State University in Normal, IL.  Please visit http://www.carlschimmel.com.

About Piece:

Two Variations on Ascent into the Empyrean is a pair of short orchestral movements inspired by my children’s artwork entitled “Rainbow for Mama, with Door”(Thora, at age 3 yrs. 9 mos.) and  “Rocketship and Blast-off Fire” (Otto, at age 3 yrs. 11 mos. The drawings, for me, reflect the children’s fascination with the immensity of our world and provide a glimpse into the immensity of the worlds inside their minds.  Both transport us into the heavens – the Empyrean – and beyond.  But while Thora enters this realm via a small golden portal, Otto is propelled skyward by the colossal power of a rocket, leaving in his wake a spectacular rush of fire and smoke.  Two Variations on Ascent into the Empyrean was composed for and premiered by conductor Glenn Block and the Illinois State University Symphony Orchestra. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Carl Schimmel's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

SANTOS, Igor

ploy, pivot

2015

5:30

Igor SANTOS

ploy, pivot

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 5:30

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.2200.2perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Igor Santos (b.1985) is a Brazilian-American composer of acoustic and electro-acoustic
concert music. His works have been performed by groups such as eighth blackbird,
Ensemble Intercontemporain, Spektral Quartet and The Florida Orchestra.
Igor is currently Ph.D. candidate in Music Composition at the University of Chicago. He
received his Master's degree from the Eastman School of Music, where he studied
under Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon and Carlos Sánchez-Gutiérrez. At Eastman he was an
active member of the Ossia New Music group, assisting in organizing and promoting
concerts of contemporary music. He received his B.M. in composition from the
University of South Florida, where he was active as board member and pianist for the
USF Composer's Consortium. Igor is currently studying under Shulamit Ran, Marta
Ptaszynska, Augusta Read Thomas and Anthony Cheung. Additional studies include
workshops and festivals such as ManiFeste, Synthetis, Fontainebleau, and Brevard
Music Center.

About Piece:

ploy, pivot (2014) is the first work in a series of pieces of mine that attempt to create a narratological structure using the superposition of music with completely different characters. This is clear, for instance, in the harp solo music, which is always punctuated and interrupted by other abrasive, stubborn gestures. Other instances of interruption govern and organize most of the rhetoric in the music – either by cancelling or triggering different textures, layers and affects. The piece was originally written for a reading session at the University of Chicago, under conductor Cliff Colnot.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Igor Santos's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

SACKS, Jacob

jqxz

2011

6:40

Jacob SACKS

jqxz

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 6:40

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.2perc.pno.str

About Composer:

The strong individual voice of Michigan-born pianist Jacob Sacks has been heard in a variety of jazz settings, from the Mingus Big Band to the Paul Motian Septet. A1995 Presidentialk scholar in the Arts, Sacks was a finalist in the 1999 Thelonious Monk International JAzz Piano Competition. Sacks has toured Europe, the U.S and Canda with such musicians as Clark Terry, Joe Maneri, Charles Gayle, Eddie Henderson, Christian McBride, Chris Potter and many others. Currently, Sacks partners with vocalist Yoon Sun Choi and is a co-leader with bassist Eivind Opsvick of the quartet Two Miles a Day. Sacks currently resides in Brooklyn where he is working on several recording projects and teaching privately.

About Piece:

As I was walking up Sixth Avenue in Manhattan one day, I couldn't help but think about how many different people would travel over that block of side walk for so many reasons, and yet co-exist, cross and follow in each other's paths. Jqxz explores the concept of multiplicity of musical ideas that share the same frame. Some develope, some are static, some relate, some conflict, and some do it all. -not unlike the marvelous cacophony of that block in Manhattan. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jacob Sacks's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

RUST, Joel

Beyond the Heart

2016

7:10

Joel RUST

Beyond the Heart

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 7:10

Instrumentation:

2222.4330.timp+1.str

About Composer:

Joel Rust (b. 1989, London) has received commissions from the Melos Sinfonia, the Park Lane Group, the Choir of Gonville & Caius College Cambridge, Filthy Lucre, Discantus, and Mr McFall’s Chamber. His music has been performed throughout the UK, in the USA, France, Holland, Germany, Israel, Colombia, and Russia, and has been broadcast on BBC Radio 3, Radio France Musique, and Radio 4 (Netherlands). In March 2014, Discantus released his work for six female voices, sunt etenim pennae volucres mihi, on their CD ‘Music for a King’. an awakening voice, for chamber ensemble, received an Honorable Mention in the ASCAP Foundation 2016 Morton Gould Young Composer Awards. Future projects include a new work for The Hermes Experiment, and a chamber opera in collaboration with David Troupes.
Joel is currently studying for a Doctorate at New York University. In 2013 he gained a Master’s with Distinction at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, where he studied with Julian Anderson, supported by the RVW Trust and the Leverhulme Trust. He graduated from the Emmanuel College, Cambridge, where he studied composition with Robin Holloway, in 2011, with a double-starred First, before spending a year at Harvard on a Herchel Smith Scholarship.

About Piece:

Beyond the Heart is my first work for orchestra, and it draws on the expressive gestures of the Romantic and post-Romantic orchestral works I grew up listening to, seeking to wear its heart on its sleeve. It also moves in the opposite direction, separating the orchestra into small groups or individuals who act almost independently of each other, sometimes with the same goals, at other times opposed. The conflict between the sweeping gestures and these more atomized processes is the central thread of the piece; its title reflects this tension.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Joel Rust's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

ROTOLO, Kyle

Apophis

2014

7:35

Kyle ROTOLO

Apophis

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 7:35

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.4230.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Called “a fresh, bold, and individual creative force” (Los Angeles’ Canyon
News), and “a very talented young composer with much to look forward to in the
future” (Paula Brusky, 2010 Bassoon Chamber Music Composition Competition),
Kyle Peter Rotolo (b. 1986) is a multi-faceted musician who grew up and still resides
in River Vale, New Jersey, just across from the City That Never Sleeps. 2012 was an
exciting year for Kyle. It saw the premiere of Marilyn’s Room, a mini-opera on his
own story and libretto, by the Peabody Opera Company, as well as the album release
of his sonatine for solo guitar Le crâne a lá cigarette qui fume on the album
Epitaphios by the lauded guitarist Anastasios Comanescu. In 2013, Kyle’s String
Quartet No. 1: Macchiato was recorded by the New England String Quartet and
released on the album Perceptions: Points of View for Small Ensemble (Navona
Records NV5909). He has been awarded the Ada Arens Morawetz Memorial Award
in Composition, third prize in the Prix d’Ete chamber music composition competition
(both from the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University), and was a finalist
in both the BMI Student Composer Awards and the ASCAP Morton Gould Young
Composer Awards.
Kyle is an alumnus of the Peabody Institute (M.M. 2013), the American
Conservatory at Fontainebleau, the Brevard Music Center, and a member of Pi
Kappa Lambda National Music Honor Society. His mentors have been Kevin Puts,
Liviu Marinescu, and N. Lincoln Hanks. He has also studied privately with Samuel
Adler, Francois Paris, and David Dzubay. Kyle wishes to thank Peabody Institute
and their director, Dr. Jeffrey Sharkey, for supporting him with two Peabody Career
Development Grants. Please “like” Kyle on Facebook
(facebook.com/KylePeterMusic) and follow him on Twitter (@KylePeterMusic).

About Piece:

N.A.S.A. experienced a brief period of deep consternation in December 2004 when scientists discovered a half-mile-wide asteroid on what was then thought to be a collision course with Earth. They named the asteroid “Apophis” after the mythological enemy of the Egyptian sun-god Ra. While N.A.S.A. has since reneged on their prediction that Apophis would collide with our planet within the next 30 years, the possibility of total annihilation still looms over our heads in some way.
I do not often use doom and gloom as inspiration for my music, but when I heard Stephen Hawking recount this harrowing tale on an episode of his Discovery channel miniseries “Into the Universe,” I could not help but conjure a musical reaction in my mind’s ear. The resulting piece is this eight-minute tour-de-force for orchestra in a moto perpetuo style, as the asteroid comes barreling toward its celestial target with immeasurable force.
In an act of artistic denial of this hopeless scenario, I dared to search for hidden joy. I believe I have found some. Perhaps there is a silver lining to knowing that everyone on the planet will suffer the same fate at the same time, together as one human race. If we all received the grim news that there will be no tomorrow for anyone, would there be any time for slander, for injustice, for war?
I would never wish such a dreadful nightmare to come true, and I am happy that N.A.S.A. withdrew their eschatological prediction. However, in a moment of dark imagination, I chose to musically illustrate a global killer hurdling toward Earth, while humanity sings rising melodies in defiance of the force of nature that will never break its spirit. Perhaps we do not need this story to be true to learn from it.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Kyle Rotolo's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

ROMANEIRO, Richardo

Sombras

2010

10:00

Richardo ROMANEIRO

Sombras

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Composer Ricardo Romaneiro was born in 1979, Sao Paulo, Brazil and currently lives in New York City. He earned his undergraduate degree in composition at the Manhattan School of Music under the tutelage of Richard Danielpour. Following private studies with Mexican composer Samuel Zyman, he completed his Master of Music degree at the Juilliard School, studying with Pulitzer-Prize composer Christopher Rouse. His music has been commissioned and performed from such ensembles and institutions as Museum of Modern Art’s Summergarden Series, Wordless Music, Metropolis Ensemble, Alvin Ailey, Maya, New Juilliard Ensemble, Quintet of the Americas, Colorado Ballet, Sacramento Ballet, New York Miniaturist Ensemble and has been performed throughout North & South America, and in Africa, Southeast Asia and China. 

Recent premieres include “The Rite:Remixed” (2008), a re-imagination of Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” for brass ensemble, percussion, & live electronics, commissioned by Wordless Music Series. This concert was performed in Prospect Park for an audience of 10,000 and nationally broadcast live on WNYC and NPR. Also featured in this performance was “Two Part Belief” a new vocal commission performed by Grammy winner soprano Hila Plitmann and the Metropolis Ensemble under the direction of Andrew Cyr. Combining his electronic and classical technique, “Storm King“ (2008), composed specially for the Museum of Modern Art’s Summergarden Series, further explored his electro-classical style and performance. Romaneiro’s composition process and music was featured in Esquire Magazine’s annual issue of America’s Best & Brightest (2007). 

About Piece:

"Sombras" in Portuguese means shadows, the conceptual inspiration for the work. Sombras depicts multiple, colored shadows as orchestral textures, motifs, and gestures. Light is represented through time; as the piece progresses, shadows overlap and transform, sculpting the structure of the composition.  The work unfolds in three sections, fast-slow-fast, and the form represents the overall perspective shifts casted by the orchestra evoking the transformation, distortion, expansion or contraction of shadows. Sombras was composed in the fall of 2009 and is 8 minutes in duration.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Jose Serebrier

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

RODRIGUEZ, Ivan

Luminis

2015

10:50

Ivan RODRIGUEZ

Luminis

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 10:50

Instrumentation:

222*2.42211.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Aspiring young conductor and composer Iván Enrique Rodríguez Mercado (b.1990) is zestfully embarking on an exciting career. At age 15, his serious interest in music was sparked with his entrance to Escuela Libre de Música (ELM) Antonio O. Paoli in his native Caguas, Puerto Rico. Rodríguez’s inner passion for composition comes from his inherent musical curiosity and explorations of sound and texture as he learned how to play the saxophone, harp, piano, violin, and vocalize. His first piece Ogoshness, for chorus and string orchestra, was premiered in 2007 by the ELM Antonio O. Paoli choir when Rodríguez was only 17.
Since his compositional debut, Rodríguez studied composition and conducting with renowned Puerto Rican composer Alfonso Fuentes and conductors Rafael E. Irizarry, William Rivera, Roselín Pabon, and Genesio Riboldi at the Conservatorio de Música de Puerto Rico. While a student, Rodríguez was known for being one of the most active composers of the institution by presenting his own work, commissions, or arrangements. Beyond the walls of the conservatory, his cultural involvement and leadership were recognized by the Puerto Rico Chapter of Junior Chamber International with the 2014 Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World award. 
Rodríguez’ opportunities have largely been in Puerto Rico, including a commission for a recording by internationally acclaimed trumpeter Luis “Perico” Ortiz and two works on John Rivera Pico’s recording Fronteras featuring contemporary classical guitar music from Puerto Rico and Cuba. His music has also been performed in Uruguay, Brazil, U.S., and Italy where the San Juan Children’s Choir performed Madre Luna—taking the 2014 Rimini International Choral Competition First Place award with the judges noting the integral part his composition played in their decision. Rodríguez, in July 2015, assisted Maestro Eduardo Marturet in the preparation for a major concert by the Miami Symphony Orchestra.
Rodríguez is currently working on a commission from Elisa Torres Pérez, noted principal harpist of Orquesta Sinfónica de Puerto Rico. This piece for guitar, cello, and harp will be premiered at Museo de Arte de Puerto Rico in December and is inspired by award-winning artist Rafael Trelles’ painting Exodo II.
Rodríguez holds a BA in Composition from Conservatorio de Música de Puerto Rico and lives in Brooklyn, NY.

About Piece:

Luminis (2015) is a set of fantasy variations on original musical motifs. The latin term ""luminis"" (singular genitive of ""lumen"" in English) represents the possession of Light. Throughout piece, the original motifs remain relatively unchanged. However the surrounding musical environment changes constantly. As the variations develop, they progressively describe the encirclement of light by darkness. Even when describing musically what could be total darkness, the original motifs remain relatively untouched. This is intended to give Light a ubiquitous quality to state that regardless of the conditions surrounding it, the energy emanating from this point—whatever it may symbolize for us individually—reinforces an inextinguishable radiancy and omnipresence.

The tempi markings for the variations are:

Muy brillante (very bright)
Tenue, opaco, débil (Dim, opaque, weak)
Rodeado de sombras (Surrounded by shadows)
Total oscuridad (Total darkness)
Poca luz, tenue, distante (Low light, dim, distant)
Luz absoluta (Absolute Light)

As the two elements of light and darkness are opposite in that one is the absence of the other, the effect of no change on the original motifs despite the constant change of the musical variations might suggest that, although opposite in nature, they conceive their existence within the same vertex. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Columbus Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Rossen Milanov

Date of reading: 10/29/2015

RICKELTON, Michael

And After the Dark

2010

15:00

Michael RICKELTON

And After the Dark

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 15:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Michael Rickelton (b.1983), a native of Charlotte, NC, earned the Bachelor of Music degree in music education from Lipscomb University where he studied composition with Jerome Reed. In the summer of 2005, Michael attended the European American Musical Alliance program at the Ecole Normale de Musique in Paris, France, studying with Claude Baker and Narcis Bonet. He is currently pursuing his master’s degree in composition from the Peabody Conservatory at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, where he is a student of Michael Hersch. In addition to Michael’s work as a composer, he remains active as a singer. He currently resides in Baltimore, MD with his wife Emily.

About Piece:

Composed in the fall of 2007, the music presented in "And After the Dark," often evokes feelings of rage juxtaposed with periods of contentment, elements of frustration relieved by triumph, the calming of the convulsive, and the darkness succumbing to clarity. My goal in this work, was to connect these disparities on levels including the artistic, intellectual and spiritual. And after the dark eplores the interaction among multiple varying figures presented throughout the orchestra. The piece focuses on three distinctly contrasting motives that provide the foundation for the work's harmonic, rhythmic and textural development. These three figures, a rising minor third, a sextuplet comprised of a pattern of 4 consecutive pitches followed by a rest and falling second, and a contrasting lyrical melody, all take on independent roles that aid the contrast of each figure to create a sound world rich in diverse character and color. The result is a work that hinges on the relationships of the contrasting: both evidently presented in the music and the allusive.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Nashville Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Giancarlo Guerrero

Date of reading: 04/07/2010

REID, Rufus

Mass Transit: Metropolis

2011

7:35

Rufus REID

Mass Transit: Metropolis

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 7:35

Instrumentation:

2222.4221.timp+5.pno.str

About Composer:

Often called a chameleon, Rufus Reid is a forty-five year veteran jazz bassist with over
350 recordings in his discography. These past thirteen years, Rufus Reid has been
composing for small and large ensembles and receiving some prestigious commissions.
In 2003 “Linear Surroundings” a composition of Four Movements: “Shadow Chasing,”
“Moods,” “The Peaceful Flame,” and “Collage” was created with generous support from
The Chamber Music America Awards New Works: Creation and Presentation
Program Grant, generously Funded by The Doris Duke Foundation.
The 2006 Raymond Sackler Composition Commission Prize was awarded to Rufus
Reid. The title, Quiet Pride, is inspired by four sculptures by the artist, Elizabeth Catlett
premiered in 2007, at the University of Connecticut/Storrs.
The United States Air Force Band of the West recorded Rufus’ big band composition,
COME OUT AND PLAY, in the spring of 2008. In the fall of 2009, the same
organization commissioned him to compose for their Concert Band. The resulting
composition is entitled, JOY IN THE OASIS.
THE JOHN SIMON GUGGENHEIM MEMORIAL FOUNDATION awarded Rufus a 2008
Guggenheim Fellowship for composition. The resulting three-movement work, MASS
TRANSIT, was debuted by the Idyllwild Arts Academy Symphony Orchestra in Idyllwild,
CA, and Los Angeles, CA, on May 7 & 8, 2011, conducted by Peter Askim.
Motéma Music, in 2010, released, Rufus Reid Trio – OUT FRONT, recording to critical
acclaim. June 2010, Rufus Reid was awarded the prestigious MacDowell Colony
Fellowship.
HUES OF A DIFFERENT BLUE, is Rufus Reid’s OUT FRONT Trio’s latest
and second Motéma Music recording released in April, 2011.
For more information you are invited to visit his web site: www.rufusreid.com

About Piece:

The challenge I faced working on this is project has been, primarily, for me to learn how to utilize the “orchestra” with my jazz sensibilities and concepts, which, at the outset,  are not highly revered by the traditionalist.  Breaking any tradition is a daunting task. For me, It has been both daunting and exhilarating to work on this project. I have always appreciated and respected all of the European and American Master Composers for their vast skills and craft. This respect and appreciation has grown enormously, to say the very least.   I have gained immense knowledge, new friendships, and empowerment by participating in the JCOI/ACO workshop.  This priceless opportunity has taught me that I must first become more articulate, efficient, and meticulous in developing my score to convey my musical thoughts. Whether the music is liked or not, isn’t the real issue, but can one convey these ideas clearly to the conductor, which will be clear to the musicians, as well. From there, the music will speak for itself!  I am clearly more smitten with the composition process more than ever.  Below is a brief general statement, per your request.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Rufus Reid's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

PURRINGTON, Hilary

Likely Pictures in Haphazard Sky

2017

9:53

Hilary PURRINGTON

Likely Pictures in Haphazard Sky

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 9:53

Instrumentation:

2222.4331.timp+3.harp.pno.str

About Composer:

Hilary Purrington (b. 1990) is a New England-based composer whose work has been recognized by the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP), and the National Federation of Music Clubs (NFMC), among others. In the summer of 2012, Purrington received funding through a Wagoner Foreign Study Grant to study Music Composition and German Language at the Freie Universität Berlin, and in the summer of 2013, she participated as a Fellow at the Yale School of Music Norfolk Chamber Music Festival. Most recently, she was featured in the 2016 NY PHIL BIENNIAL. Purrington’s music has been performed by many distinguished ensembles, including the Peabody Modern Orchestra, the Yale Philharmonia, the American Modern Ensemble, and the ChoralArt Camerata. Recent commissions include new works for the Chicago Harp Quartet, the Musical Chairs Chamber Ensemble, and the Melodia Women’s Choir of NYC. Upcoming projects include commissions from Washington Square Winds, inFLUX, and the New York Youth Symphony. Purrington holds degrees from The Juilliard School and the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University. She is currently pursuing a Master of Musical Arts at the Yale School of Music.  

About Piece:

Likely Pictures in Haphazard Sky (2016) contrasts moments of delicate sparseness with passages of rich textures and emphatic lyricism.  Throughout the work, the fragments introduced in the sparse, faltering opening gradually coalesce into distinct melodic ideas. The title comes from a poem called “Starlight” by William Meredith. Meredith uses constellations to explore, among other things, our natural fear of randomness and our instinctive desire to find or create meaningful patterns.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/23/2017

PRANGCHAROEN, Narong

Pubbanimitta for Orchestra

2011

8:05

Narong PRANGCHAROEN

Pubbanimitta for Orchestra

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 8:05

Instrumentation:

3*3*3*3.4331.timp+3.str

About Composer:

The music of Thai composer NARONG PRANGCHAROEN has been called “absolutely captivating” (Chicago Sun Times).  Prangcharoen has received many international prizes, including the Alexander Zemlinsky International Composition Competition Prize, the 18th ACL Yoshiro IRINO Memorial Composition Award, the Pacific Symphony’s American Composers Competition Prize, the Toru Takemitsu Composition Award, and the Annapolis Charter 300 International Composers Competition. In 2007, the Thai government named Prangcharoen a Contemporary National Artist and awarded him the Silapathorn Award.

Prangcharoen’s music has been performed in Asia, America, Australia, and Europe by many renowned ensembles such as the Tokyo Philharmonic Orchestra, the Pacific Symphony, the Grant Park Orchestra, the Nagoya Philharmonic, the Melbourne Symphony, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Shanghai Philharmonic Orchestra, the Oregon Symphony Orchestra, and the Minnesota Orchestra, under many well-known conductors, such Carl St. Clair, Carlos Kalmer, Osmo Vänskä, Jose-Luis Novo, and Mikhail Pletnev.

Prangcharoen’s music has been performed at many important music festivals, such as the Grant Park Music Festival, the Asia: the 21st Century Orchestra Project, the MoMA Music Festival, the Maverick Concerts: “Music in the Wood”, The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, the Library of Congress, and the Beijing Modern Music Festival.

Prangcharoen received his doctoral degree from University of Missouri-Kansas City. His primary teacher is Dr. Chen Yi.  Prangcharoen is currently teaching at the Community Music and Dance Academy of the Conservatory of Music, University of Missouri in Kansas City.  He is the founder of the Thailand Composition Festival in Bangkok, Thailand.

About Piece:

In Pali, Pubbanimitta can be translated as foreboding. Tis piece uses folk-like material to protray the Erath's atmosphere and, later on, more complex textures depicting climate change and the natural disasters that has caused.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/04/2011

PODGURSKY, Jeremy

our bliss, it comes in waves

2009

9:30

Jeremy PODGURSKY

our bliss, it comes in waves

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 9:30

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

A proud native of Louisville, KY, Jeremy Podgursky’s music has been featured in venues and festivals in the United States, Europe and Japan. His compositions have been performed, premiered, and read by groups such as Alarm Will Sound, Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Indiana University New Music Ensemble, Contemporaneous, Present Music, Square Peg Round Hole, Left Coast Chamber Ensemble, Inscape, Lost Dog New Music Ensemble, Holographic, Peabody Modern Orchestra, and NewEar New Music Ensemble. Some of his awards and honors come from the American Academy Of Arts And Letters, Copland House Residency Award, Indiana University JSoM Dean’s Prize, Fromm Music Foundation Commission, Finale/American Composers Forum/Eighth Blackbird, Mizzou New Music Festival, American Composers Orchestra/Earshot, Northridge Prize For Orchestra, Minnesota Orchestra Composers Institute, and 1st place in the National SCI/ASCAP Commissioning Competition.

Jeremy received his B.M. and M.M. in music composition and piano from the University of Louisville. He taught music theory/aural skills and private composition lessons at the University of Louisville, and created and taught multiple after-school composition programs in Louisville-area public high schools. Currently located in Bloomington, IN, Jeremy recently completed a Jacobs School of Music Doctoral Fellowship (D.M.) at Indiana University-Bloomington, where he was an Associate Instructor in the Music Composition department.

Along with composer Ryan Chase and conductor Ben Bolter, Jeremy is the co-founder of a new music project in Bloomington, IN called HOLOGRAPHIC. The project draws from a pool of the JSoM’s finest performers, with concerts held in alternative venues. Jeremy was the founder/singer/songwriter/guitarist of the psychedelic/indie rock band THE PENNIES. Having shared the stages with the likes of My Morning Jacket, Mike Watt, The Grifters, Superchunk, Archers of Loaf, and the Apples in Stereo, THE PENNIES entertained audiences all over the U.S. and Europe. Music by THE PENNIES has been featured in episodes of the show SHAMELESS, starring William H. Macy and Emmy Rossum, on the SHOWTIME network.

About Piece:

"our bliss, it comes in waves, my first full-length piece for orchestra, explores contrasting musical and thematic elements in hopes of peacefully achieving a sense of compromise.  Conceptually and aesthetically, I found myself reconciling disparate qualities such as: liquid vs. solid, diffused vs. concentrated, transparent vs. translucent (and/or opaque), exposed vs. obscured, rigid vs. flexible, primal (body) vs. transcendental (spirit), and diatonic harmony vs. pentatonic harmony.

The piece begins with pitched percussion, piano and horns attempting to establish themselves as thematic material. Their wave-like patterns are stark, naked and mechanical, and they become an important contrasting element when the other families of instruments finally enter. Through disjunctive, herky-jerky starts and stops that alternate between diatonic and pentatonic melodies, the percussion and horns eventually arrive at the main theme of the piece. As the piece progresses, every repetition of the theme introduces a new family of instruments.

The strings, woodwinds and brass each stretch and pull the flow in a collage-like fashion. These instrumental families move in wave patterns of different rates and virtually eradicate any sense of a constant pulse. Throughout the piece, these families always appear as mass sonorities; their size and depth are controlled by dynamics, register and gesture. Entrances usually appear out of nowhere and either overlap or jump cut with the waves that come before and after.  The overall effect is that of time being bent or sculpted, and the cyclical return of the main theme helps create a non-linear journey.  Harmonically, the strings and brass are often diametrically opposed (diatonic vs. pentatonic) while the woodwinds explore the gray areas in between. The piece climaxes with the synchronization of the different families of instruments, each a tributary in a flowing river of sound.  A sparkling, shimmering brass finale then overtakes this peaceful stream.

This piece is dedicated to Noah Podgursky, the newest member of my family.
"

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Colorado Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 07/17/2009

PINTO-CORREIA, Andreia

Acanto

2009

12:00

Andreia PINTO-CORREIA

Acanto

Year Composed: 2008

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

2222.2200.timp+1.str

About Composer:

Born in Lisbon, Portugal, Andreia Pinto Correia is currently pursuing a composition doctoral degree at the New England Conservatory, studying with Michael Gandolfi, after having received her Master’s degree there as student of Bob Brookmeyer.  She started her musical studies in Lisbon at the Academia de Amadores de Música. Originally a performer, she dedicated herself to composition in 2002, after being unable to perform due to an accident.
 
Recent recognitions include a 2009 Tanglewood Music Center Fellowship, the 2009 NEC Contemporary Ensemble Composition Award, the 2008 Toru Takemitsu Award by the Japan Society, a 2008 Composers Conference Fellowship, a 2008 Orquestra do Algarve Young Composer Fellowship, a 2008 NEC Merit Award, a 2008/9 Luso-American Foundation Scholarship, and a 2008 ASCAPLUS Award, among others.

About Piece:

Acanto is an architectonic ornamentation inspired by the leaves of a plant native to Mediterranean humid climates (acanthus mollis). In Portuguese or Spanish language it may also be written as a canto meaning as in ‘to sing’. 
The idea for this piece derives from the manipulation of a simple melodic cell, an ornament that travels through the work appearing in different instruments or combination of instruments, registers, and pitch/rhythmic mutations. Thus, the three movements represent varied textural realizations of the same ornament. Sometimes I use particular features of a movement across movement boundaries, resulting in an organic use of the concept of memory and anticipation. The third and last movement, Adagio molto, is modeled after the third movement of Three Places in New England by Charles Ives. Here, the use of ornamentation is expanded to form a simple lullaby played by the vibraphone while the rest of the orchestra plays transformations, mainly textural, of my original cell.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Memphis Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: David Loebel

Date of reading: 05/21/2009

PEGRAM, Jules

Shadows of the Studio

2015

9:10

Jules PEGRAM

Shadows of the Studio

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 9:10

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Composer Jules Pegram (b. 1991) writes music modern in its sensibility and sophisticated in its craft, yet full of shimmering colors, boundless energy, and? a?n unbridled lyricism that make it refreshingly accessible. His kaleidoscopic sound-world is influenced by everything from contemporary concert music and the rigors of modernism to film and television scores, show tunes, urban environments, popular culture, and the natural world.  In 2013, Pegram’s orchestral work Neon Nights was selected as the winning composition in both the Marilyn K. Glick and Symphony in C Young Composers Competition?s?, resulting in performances by the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra and New Jersey's Symphony in C, respectively. Other awards include recognition as a Finalist in the 2012 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composers Competition as well as in the 3rd International Frank Ticheli Composition Contest, the Presser Foundation’s Undergraduate Scholar Award, the Sadye J. Moss Endowed Music Composition Prize, selection in both the University of Southern California New Music for Orchestra and Indiana State University's "Music Now" competitions, and “Honorable Mention” in the Donald Sinta Quartet's National Composition Competition. He was also a recipient of the USC Discovery Scholars prize and was named an Outstanding Graduate of the USC Thornton School of Music's Department of Composition. Pegram is pursuing the Master of Music in Composition at the University of Michigan, where he has studied with Michael Daugherty and Bright Sheng. Pegram received the Bachelor of Music in Composition (summa cum laude) from the University of Southern California, where he studied with Oscar nominee Bruce Broughton, Frank Ticheli, Morten Lauridsen, Stephen Hartke, Donald Crockett, Erica Muhl, and USC Trojan Marching Band arranger Tony Fox. He studied classical piano with Alin Melik-Adamyan and jazz piano with Yellowjackets keyboardist Russell Ferrante.

About Piece:

Shadows of the Studio for Orchestra is my musical tribute to the glory days of Hollywood's "studio system," a factory-like production setup that allowed for the efficient, speedy creation and distribution of quality motion pictures, thousands of which are now considered cinema classics. This landmark era of filmmaking spanned from the rise of the major studios in the 1920s up until the studio system’s ultimate demise in the 1950s. During that illustrious period, movie moguls like Carl Laemmle at Universal, Daryl Zanuck at 20th Century Fox, the Warner Bros., and Louis B. Mayer and Irving Thalberg of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer fame served as helms of production at their respective studios, reigning over a vast filmic empire the likes of which will surely never be seen again. As Shadows of the Studio begins, we walk through an old studio’s massive iron gates and into an abandoned soundstage, dust-filled and full of movie relics from days gone by. Out of this dark, funereal texture, the music suddenly starts to build, the studio roars back to life, and we are transported back to the glory days of Hollywood, circa 1940. Once the ratchety sounds of a film projector click us into full gear, a lush, sweeping theme enters, something akin to what one might have heard in a classic Hollywood film noir score. Our musical flashback is all hustle-and-bustle, in a sonic framework as clean and crisp as a motion picture produced by one of the  “majors.” As the composition continues, we take an evening flight through the Hollywood Hills, with filmmakers below still hard at work on the set, chic bars and nightclubs booming, spotlights flickering outside a premiere at Grauman’s Chinese  theatre, and of course that legendary white sign beaming off in the distance. Eventually the music reaches epic proportions, and Tinseltown is at last restored to its former glory. But this grandiose reimagining of a lost era is little more than a dream, and after an explosive climax the piece gradually fades out to its ghostly conclusion, sending the studio back into the shadows of the past.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jules Pegram's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

ORDWAY, Scott

Symphony No. 3

2015

15:05

Scott ORDWAY

Symphony No. 3

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 15:05

Instrumentation:

2233.4231.timp.hrp.str

About Composer:

Scott Ordway (b. 1984, California) is an American composer and conductor. In 2014, he joined the faculty of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. During the 2013–14 season, his orchestral, choral, chamber, and multimedia works were heard on 35 concerts in eleven states and in Europe. Season highlights include the European premiere of his tone poem Detroit at the Hochschule für Musik Hanns Eisler in Berlin, and the premiere of Brotherly Love, a multimedia collaboration with more than 100 Philadelphia schoolchildren funded by the American Composers Forum. His chamber music has been presented recently by the SOLI Chamber Ensemble (San Antonio), Boston Musica Viva, Portland Chamber Music Festival, the Michigan Recital Project, and the Momenta and Arneis String Quartets.

Ordway has spent summers at the Aspen Summer Music Festival, the Accademia Chigiana in Tuscany, June in Buffalo, the Oregon Bach Festival, the Freie Universität Berlin, and as a two-time Artist-in-Residence at the Foundation House in Bel Air, California. In recent seasons, he has worked with graduates of America’s leading musical institutions, including the Juilliard School, the Curtis Institute of Music, the New England Conservatory, and the Eastman School of Music, as well as ensembles such as Fireworks, Counter)induction, So Percussion, and the Oregon Pro Arte Chamber Orchestra.

About Piece:

"Ordway’s Symphony No. 3 was composed between July 2012 and March 2013 in Aspen, Philadelphia, and NYC. It unfolds in a single movement over twenty-two minutes. The first performance was given in 2013 by the Bates College Orchestra with the composer conducting. It has also been recorded by the Curtis Symphony Orchestra conducted by David Hayes.

Though the work is abstract, the music is characterized by a sense of open space and gradual unfolding. The symphonic argument traces the distinction between the vast external permanence of natural landscape and the volatile subjectivity of our own inner lives."

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Scott Ordway's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Stefan Sanders

Date of reading: 02/11/2015

OMICCIOLI, Nicholas

burning

2014

6:30

Nicholas OMICCIOLI

burning

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 6:30

Instrumentation:

2222.2220.timp+1.pno.str

About Composer:

Nicholas S. Omiccioli (b.1982) is currently a residency fellow with the Charlotte Street Urban Culture Project in Kansas City, MO. Just recently, Nick was also awarded a residency at Copland House which he will fulfill in October 2013. His music has been performed in Canada, Italy, Austria, Lithuania, the United Kingdom, Thailand, China, New Zealand, Sweden, and throughout the United States. Nick has worked with ensembles such as the Jasper String Quartet, Calder Quartet, Curious Chamber Players, le Nouvel Ensemble Moderne, l’Orchestre de la francophonie, and the Society for New Music to name a few. His music has been featured at the Aspen Music Festival and School, Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival, (le) Poisson Rouge, Beijing Modern Music Festival, Thailand International Composition Festival, Wellesley Composers Conference, Festivalis Druskomanija, and Domain Forget, among others.
Nick has been commissioned by the Wellesley Composers Conference, Shouse Institute at the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival, National Arts Centre in Canada, Third Angle Ensemble, and the Chamber Music Project at the Aspen Music Festival and School. In addition to receiving many awards, grants, and fellowships, Nick was a finalist for the 2013 Rome Prize in music composition and has received multiple nominations for scholarships by the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His primary composition teachers include James Mobberley, Chen Yi, Zhou Long, and Brian Bevelander. He has also had additional study with João Pedro Oliveira and Stephen Hartke. Nick holds degrees from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and Heidelberg University. When not composing, Nick enjoys listening to heavy metal and watching cartoons. To find out more, please visit www.nicholasomiccioli.com.

About Piece:

Burning (2014) for orchestra is inspired by my early musical years playing guitar in heavy metal bands. The aim of the work is to exploit the raw, visceral nature of metal music through driving rhythms, virtuoso string and woodwind writing, melodic hooks, and a hard edge. The opening gesture, resembling the lighting of a fuse, is intended to build over the course of the work ending in a blaze of activity that pushes the envelope to eleven.

Aside from a wealth of practical advice regarding score and part preparation I received through the initial reading, I was finally able to hear the piece after two-and-a-half months of non-stop work! For the next reading, I hope to correct some balance issues, thicken up some orchestration, expand some ideas while cutting others, and compose an ending. I felt that the piece was not heavy metal enough, so I plan to really go for it this time! While the reading in February went really well, I am planning on simplifying some ideas even more to make the rehearsal process go even smoother. I also can't wait to hear how the other composers' works have grown over these last few months!

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony Under Construction

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/04/2014

OGBURN, James

Proximate Spaces

2009

9:00

James OGBURN

Proximate Spaces

Year Composed: 2008

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

1111.1110.1perc.pno.sax*.str

About Composer:

James Ogburn (b. 1974) grew up in the scenic Cascade Mountains of Washington State. He has studied composition with Mark Polishook, David Asplin, Woiciek Widlak, Eric Flesher, Roger Zahab, Amy Williams, Eric Moe, and Matthew Rosenblum. After completing a B.M. in Composition and Theory at Central Washington University (2004), he moved to Pittsburgh, Pa where he received a Masters of Arts in Composition and Theory from the University of Pittsburgh (2006). As a Mellon Pre-doctoral Fellow, he is currently completing his dissertation: “Conflicting Lines, Cohesive Structures: Multiple-Directed Linearity in Witold Lutoslawski’s Third Symphony.” His compositions have received performance at June in Buffalo (Buffalo, New York 2007), the Audio Art Festival (Krakow, Poland 2003), and the SCI National Student Competition (Iowa City, 2004), among others. In addition, his works have been read and recorded by the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, The University of Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Central Washington University Orchestra, red fish blue fish percussion ensemble, Flux Quartet, the Ying Quartet, Boston Modern Orchestra Project, IonSound Project, ALIA MUSICA Pittsburgh, and others. James currently lives in Pittsburgh with his two cats.

About Piece:

The formal continuity of Proximate Spaces was suggested by competing ideas of the 1990’s surrounding the search for a unified theory to explain the fundamental forces, dimensional composition, and existence of matter in the known universe. Much of the pitch material derives from a two-octave mode (18 pitches in series) and three subset hexachords of that mode. The work develops the tension between mechanistic devotion to this mode and episodes of free chromaticism, between strictly repeating rhythmic patterns and rhythmic variation, between instrumentation according to families and a free exchange of musical ideas regardless of instrumental relation. Initially aligned with the mechanistic paradigms of mode and regular rhythmic patterns, in several places the piano breaks free and attempts to incite revolt against the piece’s system by abandoning strict adherence to these structures. Although some other members of the ensemble briefly depart from the system, ultimately—and especially rhythmically—the machine prevails. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to James Ogburn's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

ACO/Penn New Music Readings

Conductor: Cliff Colnot

Date of reading: 04/16/2009

O'MALLEY, Patrick

Even in Paradise…

2015

11:35

Patrick O'MALLEY

Even in Paradise…

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 11:35

Instrumentation:

2*222.4231.timp+2.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Patrick O’Malley (1989) is a composer whose works explore the musical interplay between emotion, color, energy, and landscape.  Currently living in Los Angeles, O’Malley grew up in Indiana, where he cultivated an interest in composition from hearing music at the local orchestra, studying piano and double bass, film scores at the movie theater, and even MIDI compositions for videogames being written at the time. His pieces span many of the contemporary mediums for classical music (orchestra, chamber ensembles, vocal music, film scores etc.), and have been performed across the United States as well as in France and Germany. Often when writing a new piece, O’Malley considers the listener’s imagination as much as every other musical element – an admittedly and enjoyably subjective endeavor.  Most recently, O’Malley has been recognized and/or performed by organizations including the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Next On Grand National Composers Intensive with wild Up, the Society of Composers Inc., The American Prize (3rd place in orchestral music, and finalist in wind band and chamber music, 2014), the Boston New Music Initiative, ASCAP’s Morton Gould Award (finalist in 2012 and 2014), and Fulcrum Point New Music Project. He has spent summers as a student at various music festivals, including the Aspen Music Festival, Bowdoin Festival, Fresh Inc. Festival, and FUBiS composition course in Berlin. He is gratefully indebted to his private teachers over the years for helping guide his work, the most recent of which include Andrew Norman, Samuel Adler, and Frank Ticheli. O’Malley is currently pursuing a doctorate degree in composition at the University of Southern California’s Thornton School of Music.

About Piece:

The Latin phrase “Et in Arcadia Ego” is a wonderful little line that nobody seems to know the actual meaning of. The words essentially translate, “I am also in Arcadia,” and are most famously known as the subject of two paintings by Nicolas Poussin from the seventeenth century. I first encountered the subject when reading an essay by the art historian Erwin Panofsky, in which he traces the evolution of interpretation of the phrase by artists. The main point of his thesis is that the phrase originally was seen as a memento mori, conveying the warning that even in paradise, there is also death (personified as the “I”). Over time this meaning was gradually reversed: even in death, one may find paradise. Other interpretations of the phrase Panofsky cites range from a depiction of “elegiac sentiment,” to meditations on the past, to simply depicting pastoral beauty as seen by an artist (the artist replacing death as the “I”), and everything in  between. Panofsky’s analysis, as well as the various artistic interpretations of the phrase, immediately struck me as a source for musical elaboration. It had everything: life, death, a pastoral setting, contemplation, emotion, humor, a concept (Arcadia) that appears in both intellectual discussion as well as pop culture, etc.. The resulting piece is an abstract reaction to the Latin subject and its various artistic guises. While nothing in the piece is a literal depiction, there are two ideas that stem directly from the life and death  images associated with the subject. The piece opens with atmospheric sounds made by the strings playing  unpitched material behind the bridge (a well-known technique for representing death in music thanks to Bernard Herrmann, though I do not use it in the same way as he). Against that, simple triadic gestures (the “life-blood” of tonal harmony) begin to pop out of the murk. Eventually, the music breaks into a fast, playful mood completely opposite to the introduction, exploring a variety of moods and colors.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Columbus Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Rossen Milanov

Date of reading: 10/29/2015

NORFLEET, Dawn

Seed

2016

6:20

Dawn NORFLEET

Seed

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 6:20

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.2perc.pno.str

About Composer:

Dawn Norfleet is a jazz flutist, vocalist, and composer residing in the Los Angeles area.  Dr. Norfleet's academic and musical journey began when she was a student in L.A. public schools, where her creative talents were nurtured by flourishing arts programs. After graduating from Wellesley College, "Dr. Dawn" studied  Classical musical composition and earned a Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Columbia University. She began her career as professional musician on the excitingly competitive music scene of New York City.   Dawn eventually returned to the Los Angeles music scene, where she is active both as a musician and a mentor for youth.  As winner of a national competition for new Classical choral works, her composition was performed by a Minnesota-based vocal ensemble.  She was delighted to have been chosen to participate in the Banff International Workshop in Jazz and Creative Music, and is thrilled to have the experience of writing her first composition for large ensemble through American Composers Orchestra/Jazz Composers Orchestra.  Currently, she is on the Teaching Artist Faculty at the Performing Arts Center of Los Angeles County, and the Colburn School of Performing Arts, and continues to perform and record with her own ensembles and as a side musician.

About Piece:

Seed grew out of one of numerous rhythmic/melodic ideas that I'd jotted down and shelved. The original sketch was for piano and a couple of uncommitted melodic instruments. Following James Newton's advice to our group about bringing our unique voice to the medium, I wanted to organically incorporate my love of African and other non-Western-derived percussive rhythm, and counterpoint in my piece. I will expand my experience with writing for orchestra, especially strings and percussion, using both traditional and contemporary technique.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Dawn Norfleet's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

NG, Wah-Hei

Beyond the Life II

2010

20:00

Wah-Hei NG

Beyond the Life II

Year Composed: 2010

Timing (in minutes): 20:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Wah-hei Ng (b. 1982) obtained his BA and MM degrees from the Chinese University of Hong Kong, studying composition with Prof. Wing-wah Chan and Prof. Victor Chan. He is now pursuing a doctoral degree in the Musical Arts at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC), where he has taught non-Western music and composition to undergraduates. His composition teachers at UMKC include Chen Yi, Zhou Long, and James Mobberley. His music has been performed by violinist Liu Xiao and by ensembles including the Jenga Percussion Quartet, the Talea Ensemble, NEXTET, Les Six, and Grammy Award-winning conductor Charles Bruffy with his Kansas City Chorale.
While an undergraduate, Ng was twice awarded the Yu-luan Shih Creativity Award of Chung Chi College. In addition, Ng is regional winner of SCI/ASCAP Student Composition Commission 2008. He also won the Crescendo Choral Competition. His music has been featured at the Asia Pacific Festival, the Oregon Bach Festival, Nevada Encounter of New Music, the CHASM Festival at Florida State University, and the 2008 Palatino Festival in Beijing.
Ng was also awarded the First Prize in the Chamber Music Composition Competition at UMKC and the Max Di Julio Prize at the Nevada Encounter of Music through his Sleepless City for Flute, Cello and Piano.
Ng has had his compositions performed in different countries. His trio Sleepless City was performed in New Zealand in 2006, and Four Rossetti’s Poems for soprano and piano received its UK premiere in 2007. Beyond the Life for solo violin was performed in Beijing at Palatino Festival 2008.

About Piece:

Love and death, are two revolving themes in the novels of Japanese writer Haruki Murakami, particularly in his Norwegian Wood and Kafka on the Shore.  In his seductive and enigmatic narration, death is sorrow but also beautiful.  I am deeply impressed by his stories and decided to write a series of works in 2008.  Beyond the Life is the title given to this series of works. But it is by no means that I am depicting any scene of his story in the music, indeed, the music is a mystical reflection upon the reading experiences.  The title means the death of a beloved one has become part of another's life; death and life are not in opposite direction, indeed the death of a beloved one would somehow determine how the people around live their lives.

The music divides into four sections. The opening section starts with a wistful oboe melody, representing the longing for a beloved but lost one.  Two motives from this melody will be further developed and transformed in the later sections.  There is a transition leading to an exciting section that develops rhythmically by means of changing meters and metric modulations, and it contrasts with the pervious section as well as the next one, which is quite static and features a transparent orchestral texture and color. In the final section, materials form the second section comes back, and getting  more intensified.  When the music is approaching its climax, a vibrant orchestral texture is created by accelerating the tempo, and increasing the dynamics and musical activities. 

The oboe melody comes back in the coda, the music ends with a surprising chord, letting the  tension suspended in the mid air.

Though in the same series, Beyond the Life I,  which is scored for solo violin, only shares the same philosophical concept with Beyond the Life II.  These two works are not required to perform side by side, and should be 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Wah-Hei Ng's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Pioneer Valley Symphony Reading

Conductor: Paul Phillips

Date of reading: 04/18/2010

NAZAYKINSKAYA, Polina

Reading the Wind

2015

5:45

Polina NAZAYKINSKAYA

Reading the Wind

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 5:45

Instrumentation:

3332.4331.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Born in Togliatti, an industrial city on the Volga River in Russia, Polina Nazaykinskaya studied piano, violin and flute as a child, and as a teenager at the Moscow Tchaikovsky Conservatory she concentrated on violin and composition. She came to the U.S. to attend the Yale School of Music, where she completed a master’s degree in composition and theory and artist diploma in composition, working with Christopher Theofanidis and Ezra Laderman. She is now is pursuing her doctorate in composition at the Graduate Center, City University of New York, studying with Tania León. She has won numerous awards including the Charles Ives Scholarship at The American Academy of Arts and Letters and has garnered performances by ensembles including the Minnesota Orchestra, the Russian National Orchestra, the Hermitage Orchestra and Chorus, the Yale Philharmonia Orchestra, the Youth Symphony Orchestra of Russia, the Omsk Philharmonic Orchestra, the St. Olaf Philharmonia and the Juventas New Music Ensemble, where her chamber opera, The Magic Mirror, drew considerable attention for its elegance and rich, intricate score.

About Piece:

Rhythms and sounds can reveal the power of the invisible world. Turning the pages of the Nature’s Book of Life, one may re-discover a sense of mystery that is part and parcel of our existence. Learning to see the words that have not been written down gives one the ability to perceive the contours of light and darkness more clearly and understand the wind that brings change. The difference between a deeper communication with the forces of nature and a method of divination disappears as future and the past become intertwined.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

NATHAN, Eric

Icarus Dreamt

2009

10:30

Eric NATHAN

Icarus Dreamt

Year Composed: 2008

Timing (in minutes): 10:30

Instrumentation:

2223.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Eric Nathan (b.1983) is currently a doctoral student in composition at Cornell University where he studies with Kevin Ernste, Roberto Sierra and Steven Stucky. He received his M.M. at Indiana University, B.A. at Yale College, and a diploma from the Juilliard School Pre-College Division. His past teachers include Claude Baker, Jeffrey Hass, Sven-David Sandström, Kathryn Alexander, John Halle, Matthew Suttor, Ira Taxin and Allan Dean. He has also worked with George Tsontakis at the Aspen Music Festival and School and has attended the Wellesley Composers Conference.

Recent awards and honors include the William Schuman Prize in the BMI Student Composer Awards (2008), an ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award (2008), 1st Prize in the SCI/ASCAP Student Commission Competition (2008), the Brian M. Israel Prize from the New York Federation of Music Clubs (2007), 2nd Prize in the NACUSA Young Composer Competition (2007), New York Art Ensemble Young Composer Competition (2005), the Dean’s Prize from Indiana University and the Abraham Beekman Cox and Beekman Cannon Friends of Music Prizes from Yale College. 

He has received commissions from the Daejeon Philharmonic Orchestra of South Korea, 2008 Composers Conference and Chamber Music Center, a consortium of twelve university bands from the Atlantic Coast Conference Band Directors Association, and the Indiana University New Music Ensemble. His music has been heard throughout the United States, as well as in Canada, the Netherlands, South Korea, and Japan; at music festivals including Spark (Minneapolis), CCM Music07 Festival, Virginia Chapter of the CBDNA Symposium for New Band Music, Ball State University and the Midwest Composers Symposium, as well as in performances by the Syracuse Society for New Music, the Yale Symphony Orchestra and brass soloists Allan Dean (trumpet), Scott Hartman (trombone), and William Purvis (french horn), among others. 

Nathan also performs as a trumpeter and conductor. He was co-music director of the Yale Bach Society Orchestra and maintains an active performance schedule as a trumpeter.

About Piece:

The concept for Icarus Dreamt is from the inspiration of Arthur Ganson’s kinetic sculpture, Machine with 23 Scraps of Paper, Henri Matisse’s collage, Icarus, and the Greek myth of Daedalus and Icarus. Icarus Dreamt combines allusions to the fluttering scraps of paper in Ganson’s sculpture, lyrical gestures of Matisse’s collage, and the narrative trajectory of the Greek myth.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Eric Nathan's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Jose Serebrier

Date of reading: 05/07/2009

NAEFF, Ruben

Dutch Disaster or Oomph or Met Zwier

2014

5:35

Ruben NAEFF

Dutch Disaster or Oomph or Met Zwier

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 5:35

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.2220.timp+1.pno.str

About Composer:

Influenced by his background as math graduate and economist, Amsterdam-born and Brooklyn-based composer Ruben Naeff writes music that embodies a mathematician’s creativity and discipline, an economist’s public awareness and a music lover’s Schwung. In collaboration with scientists, cartoonists, and newspaper de Volkskrant, Ruben released the CD De Bètacanon, a musical canon about the hard sciences. Other interdisciplinary works include The Dancing Dollar about today’s economic crisis and The YouOpera, covering the Internet, including youopera.org that sings a user’s Facebook wall.

Ruben co-founded the West 4th New Music Collective that promotes the work of emerging musicians. His music has been presented by Bang on a Can Marathon and happyChaos, and has been performed in the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Latvia, Switzerland, Austria and across the USA. He worked with Signal, JACK Quartet, Contemporaneous, Wild Rumpus, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Deviant Septet, Vigil, Cadillac Moon, Erasmus Kamerkoor, Quatre Bouches, orchestra Con Brio, and such musicians as Lindsay Kesselman (Einstein on the Beach), Nicholas Photinos (eighth blackbird), Jamie Jordan, David Friend, Richard Valitutto and Andy Meyerson.

Ruben holds master’s degrees in math and composition from the University of Amsterdam and New York University, respectively. He studied with Michael Gordon and Daan Manneke, and participated in masterclasses by Louis Andriessen, David Lang, Augusta Read Thomas and Christopher Rouse. He attended the conservatories of Amsterdam and The Hague, and the programs of Aspen Music Festival, June in Buffalo, Bang on a Can, Music11 and the UNL Chamber Music Institute. Ruben received the prestigious HSP Huygens Scholarship and grants from the Netherland-America Foundation, Jerome Fund for New Music and the American Composers Forum, the Van Bijleveltstichting and the Fonds voor de Geld- en Effectenhandel. He earned recognition from Wild Rumpus, Ethel/ClefWorks, Golden Hornet, Renegade Ensemble, Hartford Opera Theatre, Center City Opera, Platypus, Andrew Gerlicher and the UvA Cultural Festival.

About Piece:

 For the Under Construction Reading Series I intend to continue my search for a new musical language, test my artistic ideas, and last but not least, have a priceless dialogue with the musicians about both the artistic and the pragmatic side of orchestral writing, during this rare and extraordinary opportunity of workshopping an orchestral work. I hope the piece will be direct, compelling and virtuosic, expressing an individual’s voice in today’s flood of choices, with today’s speed and spectacle, but as clear as a PowerPoint presentation and from a very personal and intimate perspective. Music, like life, is all about finding your way through difficult situations: the more challenging it becomes, the more rewarding the results. I’d like to hear that in music.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ruben Naeff's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony Under Construction

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/04/2014

MUSKAL, Tamar

Water Colors

2010

10:00

Tamar MUSKAL

Water Colors

Year Composed: 2004

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Educated both in Israel and the United States, Ms. Muskal's music harmonizes the unique cultural aspects of both places. Her music is always in a counterpoint style, carefully structured, and with great attention for details. She was born in Jerusalem, Israel. She studied viola, music theory and composition at the Rubin Academy for Music and Dance in Jerusalem and earned her BA in 1991 where she studied with Mark Kopytman. Ms. Muskal came to the United States in 1994 and subsequently earned her Master's degree from Yale University, where she studied with Jacob Druckman and Martin Bresnick. She continued her studies at the City University of New York, where she studied with David Del Tredici and Tania Leon. 
 
Recent and future commissions and collaborations include a piece for the Eighth Blackbird ensemble along with three interactive videos by Daniel Rozin, a piece for cello (Maya Beiser),  oud (Bassam Saba) and percussion (Jamey Haddad and Shane Shanahan) a Carnegie Hall commission, a commission from the New York Whitney Museum to write music for two silence films by Alice Guy Blanche, a song cycle for the 2009 Grammy winner Hila Plitmann on poems by David Grossman, a song cycle for Lucy Shelton and the Colorado string quartet, a solo piano piece for Lisa Moore and a piano trio for the 2011 Salt Bay Chamber Music Festival.

About Piece:

"Water Colors, for orchestra is inspired by the act and art of painting. The piece is based on two alternate themes: the first is played by the strings section and occasionally is accompanied by chords in the piano and harp. Like a painter who lets his brush move freely on the canvas, the melodic line moves freely up and down. The melody is pretty mellow, nothing about its rhythm, dynamic or intervals is too expressive or dramatic.

The second theme is in complete contrast, it is very rhythmic, loud and played by the brass section.

From time to time, between the two themes' appearance, there is a phrase that is divided between the entire orchestra which consists of a series of ascending and descending broken major triads.

The piece has three main sections, the first section contains the two themes that appear alternately a number of times. In the second section the order and organization that characterized the first section are now falling apart, the meter is not steady, the harmonic and melodic directions are not clear and the entire orchestra joins its forces together to create five big, loud and dramatic outbreaks. In this chaos, the first theme ""finds"" its way out, while the chaotic atmosphere dies, and that theme takes us to the third and last section which is based on the ascending/descending broken triads. The excitement is elevated and reaches a big climatic point at the end of the piece.
"

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Tamar Muskal's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

MORRIS, Ben

Old Seven Mile

2016

8:09

Ben MORRIS

Old Seven Mile

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 8:09

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Described by the Huffington Post as “lovely,” the music of Ben Morris (b.1993) explores the intersections between jazz and concert music.  A recent graduate from the University of Miami, Ben is currently pursuing his masters’ at Rice University as a Brown Fellow. He has studied with Lansing McLoskey, Eric Ewazen, Stephen Hartke, Chet Biscardi, Missy Mazzoli, Brian Lynch, among others. LUNAR Ensemble, Cadillac Moon, Living Earth Show, Resound Duo, Fredericksburg Brass, American Modern Ensemble, the Cleveland Orchestra, Imani Winds, and the Frost Symphony and Concert Jazz Band have performed his music.
Ben received an ASCAP Morton Gould Award, a NJMEA Composers Award, the 2015 Frost Concerto Competition Prize, and two Klezmer Company Orchestra Composers’ Prizes, and three Festival Miami Composers’ Awards. Ben attended the Imani Winds Chamber Music Festival, New Music on the Point, and the American Composers’ Orchestra Jazz Composers’ Institute and interns with film composer Michael Bacon.

About Piece:

"Old Seven Mile" is the longest continuous bridge over open water, located in the Florida Keys. The first bridge built there, completed in 1935, still stands, but it’s a shadow of a newer bridge built in the 80’s. A drive on the new bridge provides views of the old, which is a ghost of the golden age of expansion in Florida. The image of the bridge stuck in my mind and returned to me in a series of dreams in which the old bridge was being constructed but never fully completed.  

The work conveys the idea of the bridge-in-progress with a broad theme that is ghosted in the beginning in the trumpets and low oboe that is expanded later in the piece. The frantic, insistent music of the beginning is an imagined scene of the construction of the bridge during a storm, with whirling winds, heavy machinery, and dredging boats working to connect the two islands together. The frantic construction is interrupted by a moment of solitude and beauty – a night full of stars on the water, before returning to the bustling activity of the construction. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ben Morris's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

MITCHELL, Nicole

Stealing Freedom in Broad Daylight

2011

5:55

Nicole MITCHELL

Stealing Freedom in Broad Daylight

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 5:55

Instrumentation:

2*222.2220.timp+2.str

About Composer:

The Chicago Reader has called Nicole Margaret Mitchell, "a compelling improviser of wit, determination, positivity, and tremendous talent." Mitchell's compositions reach across sound worlds, integrating new ideas with the legacy of jazz, gospel, pop and African percussion. Mitchell has been featured at art venues and festivals throughout Europe, the U.S. and Canda. Mitchell was the first woman president of Chicago's groundbreaking Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM), and helped to co-found the AACM's first all women ensemble, Samana. As a composer, performer and educator, Mitchell continues in the exciting directions in music that AACM has charted for decades. She is currently a Visiting Lecturer at University of Illinois where she directs the UIC Jazz Ensemble and teached jazz history. She also teaches jazz at Chiarts, Chicago's first public high school for the arts.

About Piece:

While composing this piece I reflected on images of Harriet Tubman journeying -of Tubman's pounding African heart, the dark night sky and its wisdom, the wondrous miracle of freedom, the torture of circumstance, the gentleness of the field, the evil in humanity that menaced her Journey to liberate others. These images are woven into the work's sound fabric.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

MINTUS, Guy

Portrait of a Moroccan Cantor

2016

11:10

Guy MINTUS

Portrait of a Moroccan Cantor

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 11:10

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Israeli born New York based jazz pianist and composer Guy Mintus has been recognized by ASCAP, Downbeat Magazine, BMI, the America-Israel Cultural Foundation & the American Composers Orchestra . At 24 years old, his performance credits include the Kennedy Center, Jazz at Lincoln Center, the Apollo Theater, Symphony Space, Red Sea Jazz Festival, and the Israel Festival. With a focus on music as a gateway to cross-cultural understanding, Guy has collaborated with master musicians from Turkey, Greece, Iran, Morocco, Azerbaijan, Cuba, India and Mali and has participated in multi-disciplinary works with artists in the visual, dance, spoken word, and theater worlds. Guy’s intimate, boundary-crossing music weaves textures and colors from across cultures ranging from Stride piano to Turkish Makams, from Indian Ragas to Sephardic Piyutim. His recordings include a debut album with the "Offlines Project," a duo Guy co-leads with Israeli-Turkish percussionist/oudist Yinon Muallem as well as the live solo album “The Mediterranean Piano.”

About Piece:

Portrait of a Moroccan Cantor singing about Love or Memories from a Place I’ve Never Been is a personal journey to be perceived it as an open love letter to Morocco and to my late Grandfather, Albert Elharrar who was born in Casablanca, 1937 and passed away four years ago. The inspiration is taken from Chapter 8, Verse 7 of ""Song of the Songs” wherein King Solomon, speaks about the tremendous power of love, comparing it to a fire that cannot be washed away even by the greatest rivers or to something that cannot be replaced or fixed even by the greatest fortunes in the world.  After several trips to old cassette stores in some very religious parts of Israel, I found a version of the verse that moved me the most being sang by a Moroccan Cantor. While writing, the image of my late grandfather kept coming up,  particularly his singing of the Shabbat dinner prayer I heard almost weekly while growing up.  

Ornaments, small fragments and key landing points in the Cantor’s lines as well as my own musical reflection of the text has become the “bread and butter” of the piece providing its main themes, motives and textural ingredients. The vocal element is apparent as well as usage of the Makammat (the middle eastern modal system), Moroccan Shaabi rhythms, aleatoric techniques and a transcription of the memory of my late grandfather singing the Shabbat prayer melody that is turned into a fugue - all of which wrapped by the words of the verse as an envelope for the entire endeavor.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Guy Mintus's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

MILNE, Andy

Element of Surprise

2013

8:00

Andy MILNE

Element of Surprise

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 8:00

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.2221.timp+3.pno.str

About Composer:

Pianist Andy Milne is considered one of the most respected voices in jazz today, composing for multiple projects spanning everything from contrapuntal, odd-metered grooves and free improvisation, to multi-form structures, orchestral works, film scores and interdisciplinary collaborations. Milne has toured and recorded with Ravi Coltrane, Ralph Alessi, Carlos Ward and Carla Cook and has collaborated with a range of artists including Sekou Sundiata, Avery Brooks, Bruce Cockburn, Geri Allen, Archie Shepp, Joe Lovano, Dave Douglas and Dianne Reeves. During the 1990s, Milne was at the core of saxophonist Steve Coleman's groups, as well as those of fellow M-BASE associates, Cassandra Wilson and Greg Osby. Milne is currently composing an orchestral work for The American Composers Orchestra and multiple film scores for William Shatner. In 2012 he was commissioned by The Herb Alpert School of Music at CalArts and funded by The Japan Foundation and New Music USA to create Strings and Serpents; a multi-disciplinary project featuring artists from Japan, France, Canada and the USA. Recipient of the prestigious Civitella Rainieri fellowship, Milne is a 2013 PennPAT roster member and the recipient of numerous commissions and awards. Milne’s group Dapp Theory, which lives at the meeting-point of lyrical jazz piano, funkified polyrhythmic exploration, and spoken word poeticism, is currently completing their next CD with Grammy winning producer Jimmy Haslip.

About Piece:

This piece is constructed drawing from inspiration of multiple sources, namely the intense awakening I experienced during the JCOI intensive. I explore redirecting my language of improvisation, balancing those sensibilities and transferring that conception to the orchestra. This work also represents my ongoing exploration to utilize the principles of classical homeopathic healing to cultivate musical accompaniments to various human behavioral pathologies.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Andy Milne's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

MILLER, Jared

Contrasted Perspectives

2014

13:20

Jared MILLER

Contrasted Perspectives

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 13:20

Instrumentation:

3222.4231.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Canadian-American composer Jared Miller is emerging as an important voice in his generation. At age 25, he has worked in collaboration with many ensembles both in North America and internationally including the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony, the Juilliard Orchestra, the Contemporary Youth Orchestra, the Sneak Peek Orchestra, Latitude 49 Ensemble and a long list of soloists that include pianists Sara Davis Buechner, Ang Li and Imri Talgam and violinist Francisco Fullana. His orchestral work 2010 Traffic Jam was commissioned by the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra for the 2010 Olympics and has since been performed over two dozen times. He has won numerous awards for composition that include a 2012 ASCAP Morton Gould Award, the 2011/12 Juilliard Orchestra Competition and the 2011 SOCAN Competition for Young Composers. An active pianist as well, Miller has performed at a variety of venues including Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Lincoln Center and the Chan Center for the Performing Arts in Vancouver, BC. As a passionate advocate for musical education and outreach Miller has worked for several initiatives including the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra Connects Program, the BC Health Arts Society, Vancouver’s Opera in the Schools and for New York’s Opportunity Music Project. 

Born in Los Angeles in 1988 and raised in Vancouver Canada, Miller completed his undergraduate studies at the University of British Columbia in composition with Stephen Chatman and Dorothy Chang and in piano with Sara Davis Buechner and Corey Hamm. He is currently a C.V. Starr Doctoral Fellow at the Juilliard School where he studies with John Corigliano and Samuel Adler. Beginning in the 2014/15 season he will be the Composer-in-Residence for the Victoria Symphony in British Columbia, Canada.

About Piece:

Over the past year, I have fallen in love with visual art, poetry and film from the Surrealist movement. Both the expansive, dream-like worlds and confluence of juxtaposing elements created by artists like Salvador Dalí, Joan Miró, Frederico García Lorca and Frederico Fellini (amongst others) have appealed to me greatly and have had a significant influence on my work. This piece attempts to explore these contrasting emotional worlds: the dream-like and the juxtaposed. The first movement, “Dalí” is most significantly influenced by his famous painting The Persistence of Memory.

In Contrasted Perspectives, evocations of shimmering waves of heat, distant bells and clocks are interpolated with melodic fragments that foreshadow material that is to come in the second movement. The quasi-blurred, yet luminescent timbral world of this movement and its almost subconscious reference to the following movement aims to depict both the emotional and psychological state of one who is dreaming. The second movement, “Fellini,” deals with the idea of juxtaposition. What excites me most about Fellini’s films are how the unexpected juxtapositions of images and ideas create a multitude of emotional worlds ranging from mirth to terror to tragedy and everything in between. In this movement, I have attempted to explore the same idea of juxtaposition in two ways. On a surface level, I attempt to combine sounds that evoke elements of reality but are found in unlikely combinations in the hope of creating new and interesting sound worlds. On a structural level, I have juxtaposed various musical styles, from jazz, to Stravinsky, to an Italian-style opera overture while retaining a limited amount of musical material. In finding juxtaposition on both sonic and structural levels, I hope to have evoked this confluence of emotion that was expressed so vividly in the Surrealist movement.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jared Miller's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

METTENS, Clay

Sleeping I am carried…

2015

8:00

Clay METTENS

Sleeping I am carried…

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 8:00

Instrumentation:

2*2*22.2220.timp+2.hrp.cel.str

About Composer:

David “Clay” Mettens (b.1990) is currently a masters composition student at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY. A native of Covington, KY, he completed his undergraduate studies at the University of South Carolina with a degree in music composition and a clarinet performance certificate. There, he was a recipient of the McNair Scholarship, the top award given to out-of-state students. The USC School of Music selected him to be the winner of the 2012 John and Lucretia Herr Composition Award, the 2012 Cantey Award for Excellence, the 2013 Arthur M. Fraser Award, and the 2013 LeDare Robinson Undergraduate Award for Academic Excellence. His primary composition teachers at USC were John Fitz Rogers and Fang Man. At Eastman, he has studied composition with Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon, David Liptak, Robert Morris, and Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez, and computer music with Allan Schindler. His orchestra piece “Sleeping I am carried…” was the winner of Eastman’s 2014 Wayne Brewster Barlow Composition Prize, and received a premiere with the Eastman School Symphony Orchestra in October 2014. He was a finalist for the 2011, 2013, and 2014 ASCAP Foundation Morton Gould Young Composer Awards and a regional finalist for the 2012 SCI/ASCAP Student Commission Competition. He studied composition at the Brevard Music Center with Robert Aldridge and David Dzubay, and attended the 2014 New Music on the Point Chamber Music Festival. Recently, his works have been performed by the Elon University Wind Ensemble; on the Café MoMus new music series at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music; OSSIA, Composers’ Forum, Graduate Composers’ Sinfonietta, and Computer Music Center concerts at Eastman; and in readings by the Eastman Philharmonia Chamber Orchestra, the Eastman Wind Orchestra, the Brevard Sinfonia, and the USC Wind Ensemble.

About Piece:

Sleeping I am carried..." is based on a melodic fragment from Alban Berg's Mombert setting "Schlafend trägt man mich," Op. 2, no. 2. I scatter references to this melody throughout, but perhaps most noticeable is the poetic connection between Mombert’s imagery and the atmosphere and form of my piece. In a dream, Mombert’s speaker traverses a great distance to return home, passing over a landscape whose rough outlines and blurry forms appear only in peripheral vision. My piece transports the listener through a hazy sonic landscape of overlapping musical ideas. One idea emerges and comes into focus, only to disappear again, as another comes to the fore. Wispy lines in the strings and flutes wind around each other, and rumbles ascend from the depths of the orchestra. In a moment of clarity near the end, Berg's vocal line appears complete as the bass line of a radiant chorale. This subsides, and the piece comes to rest on an extended melody in the strings, concluding with a final evaporation of the dream world.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Clay Mettens's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

MCPHERSON, Andrew

First Light

2009

10:00

Andrew MCPHERSON

First Light

Year Composed: 2006

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

2222.2220.tomp+1.hrp.str

About Composer:

Andrew McPherson (b. 1982), a native of St. Paul, Minnesota, did his undergraduate work at MIT, where he studied composition with Peter Child and John Harbison.  After completing degrees in music and electrical engineering, he wrote his Master's thesis in Barry Vercoe's computer music group at the MIT Media Lab.  Andrew is currently completing a Ph.D. in composition at the University of Pennsylvania, where he studies with James Primosch, Jay Reise, and Anna Weesner.  He has attended the Tanglewood, Aspen, and Bowdoin music festivals, and received the 2009 Jacob Druckman Prize from Aspen and a 2008 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.  Past collaborators include Network for New Music, the Tanglewood New Fromm Players, the BUTI Wind Ensemble, and the MIT Symphony and Chamber Orchestras, among others.

About Piece:

First Light traces an arc from veiled, shadowy origins through episodes of delicate interplay and contemplation. The hesitant primary theme, perhaps not recognized as such initially, confidently returns at the culmination of the piece before giving way to a subdued coda. McPherson says, “For me, dawn often suggests a night of work gone on too long, but this piece seeks to evoke a setting quite removed from urban life, the course of a day unburdened by the usual routines.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

ACO/Penn New Music Readings

Conductor: Cliff Colnot

Date of reading: 04/16/2009

MCMANUS, Andrew

Strobe

2014

9:30

Andrew MCMANUS

Strobe

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 9:30

Instrumentation:

22*2*2.2200.2perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

The music of Andrew McManus (b. 1985) mixes strange sounds and irregular rhythms - some beautiful, others grating and bizarre - to find new ways of exploring spirituality, surrealism and theatrical drama. In May 2014 his opera Killing the Goat will be premiered by eighth blackbird, the Pacifica Quartet and members of the Contempo Chamber Players at the University of Chicago.
Based on the novel La Fiesta del Chivo (The Feast of the Goat) by Mario Vargas Llosa. In 2013 Ancient Vigils, a New York Youth Symphony First Music Commission, was premiered at Carnegie Hall in New York City. This piano quintet is a restive, distorted tapestry of complex bell sonorities, Renaissance dance rhythms, faded religious imagery and viol consorts.

Andrew's  previous works include Identity(2008), which was premiered at the 2008 Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute, and The Concerto of Deliverance (2010), which was read by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra and premiered by the University of Oklahoma Symphony. He is also a creator of electronic music. His playback work Mesospherics (2011-2013), recently featured at the University of South Florida New Music Festival, weaves together a diverse collection of sounds that range from beautiful, vivid and scintillating to rough, unwieldy and cacophonous.

As a violist, he also is passionate about composing for strings. His string quartet The Sacred and the Profane has been performed by the Spektral Quartet in Chicago, and received its European premiere at the highSCORE festival in Pavia, Italy. Other works have been performed at the Wellesley Composers Conference, the Bowdoin International Music Festival and the Atlantic Music Festival. A native of Massachusetts, he is currently a doctoral student at the University of Chicago, where he studies with Augusta Read Thomas, Marta Ptaszynska, Shulamit Ran and Howard Sandroff. He also holds degrees from the Eastman School of Music and Yale University. His other honors include a BMI Student Composer Award and honorable mentions from ASCAP. For more, please visit
www.andrewmcmanusmusic.com.

About Piece:

The word “strobe” conjures up quite a few images and concepts for me. These include jarring pulses of bright light, the stop-motion we might observe when watching someone or something move under a strobe light, and electronic dance music (or “EDM”). But while Strobe references all of these things - with sharp, pointed, scattershot rhythmic textures, erratic shrieks of brilliance and the occasional thumping kick drum, it also explores some fleeting images that don’t necessarily go together, like photographs that disappear before we can fully grasp them. The piece’s central section features soaring but wistful oboe and horn melodies, followed by a swing-jazz-like interjection with muted trumpets, snare drum and piano. But this suddenly vanishes into a darkly sonorous string chorale. While the acute brilliance of the early part of the piece eventually returns, this shadowy tinge persists in the background, especially at the end, when a shattering major chord in the winds and brass leaves behind wispy, glowing sonic artifacts that quickly vanish.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot New York Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthias Pintscher

Date of reading: 06/03/2014

MCCAFFREY, A.J.

Thank You for Waiting

2013

15:25

A.J. MCCAFFREY

Thank You for Waiting

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 15:25

Instrumentation:

3*3*3*3.4331.timp+4.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

“A voice that leaps out and grabs you” and “loopy and charming” are how the Glasgow Herald and the Boston Globe describe the music of composer A.J. McCaffrey.   A.J has received commissions from the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Royal Scottish National Orchestra, the Tanglewood Music Center and the Radius Ensemble, and his music has been performed by the New Fromm Players and members of the Boston Modern Orchestra Project, Alarm Will Sound, the Scottish Chamber Orchestra and the Chiara Quartet.  Recent projects have included an arrangement for the Atlantic Chamber Ensemble’s Project Beck and A.J.’s own composition/musician documentary series This Is What Really Happened for solo and pre-recorded instruments.  Most importantly, and least conveniently, he is the long-distance member of the Portland (OR)-based band Planes Intersect.  
A native of the Boston area, A.J. has been an active singer, guitarist and songwriter since high school.  He was mistakenly referred to as a genre of pop music unto himself by his college newspaper, and his subsequently inflated ego led A.J. to study composition at Rice University, followed by further adventures at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama with composer James MacMillan.  The academic train finally ran out of steam at the University of Southern California (USC), where A.J. has just completed the doctorate in music composition with composers Donald Crockett and Stephen Hartke.  He currently lives in southern California, where he teaches music theory and aural skills at USC, composition through the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Composer Fellowship Program, and composition and musical analysis at the Longy School of Music of Bard College’s Los Angeles-based Masters of Arts in Teaching program.

About Piece:

In the last few pieces that I’ve written, I’ve been obsessed with finding the “ghost in the machine” – that is, I’ll imagine some great big engine or device that is mechanically cranking out music, and over the course of the piece I’ll try to uncover the spirit within that machine and the core emotion that seems to be driving the whole process.  This piece, Thank You for Waiting, is the first one in a while where I didn’t have any kind of conceptual mechanical device in mind.  Nevertheless, I can’t help but notice some similarities to these older pieces.  The music is initially set off by something one could easily imagine as a giant car horn or alarm, and over the next 14 minutes a melody unwinds, in various states of strength and decay, that seems relentless in its momentum.  It is a melody that, in my mind, never lands or completes itself.  The title of this piece, Thank You for Waiting, could easily serve as a note to any audience of my music, but here specifically it expresses my hope that the unsettled and unresolved nature of the musical material will be heard as a texture in and of itself, and that the “waiting” on the part of the listener will become its own reward.  Additionally, as this piece was my doctoral dissertation in composition at the University of Southern California, the title is a very direct message to my wife, family and professors, all of whom did lots of waiting of their own while I finished this piece.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 04/09/2013

MATHISEN, Ole

The Minds Eye Inverted

2013

3:15

Ole MATHISEN

The Minds Eye Inverted

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 3:15

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Ole Mathisen is a saxophonist, composer and teacher, with a strong
background in jazz. He holds a Masters Degree from Manhattan School of
Music where he studied arranging with Maria Schneider and a Bachelor
Degree from Berklee College of Music. Mathisen is currently a member of the jazz
faculty at Columbia University, where he teaches saxophone and directs ensembles.
Mathisen has received numerous awards, including The Composers Grant from Komponistenes Vederlags Fond of Norway, Chamber Music America’s New Jazz Works
Grant, ASCAP Plus Awards in 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008 and 2009, a DANY Arts Grant from the Danish Government, a Tono Work Stipend from the Norwegian Composers Rights Organization, an Artist Educational Stipend from the Norwegian Government, a Faculty Association Award and Phil Woods Incentive Award from Berklee College of Music. Mathisen has worked on more than 100 CD releases, composed several movie,
television scores and commercials.

About Piece:

The tone Poem Mind’s Eye Inverted, borrows from the jazz musicians experience and explores the outward communication of ideas that are instinctual, visceral and intuitive, through lyrical musical gestures. An abstract dialogue between the woodwinds, brass and strings in the middle section of the piece alludes to the improvisational interaction that happens in a jazz setting. Parts of the composition employs what I call tone fields, which are subsets of available tonal pitches that varies in each octave.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ole Mathisen's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic JCOI

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 04/24/2013

MASAOKA, Miya

Other Mountain

2013

9:55

Miya MASAOKA

Other Mountain

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 9:55

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.2perc.str

About Composer:

Miya Masaoka resides in New York City and is a classically trained musician, composer and sound/installation artist. She has created works for traditional Japanese instruments, chamber ensembles, mixed choirs, telematic performances and designed interactive wearable textiles. Also, she has composed pieces using spatialization, sonification of data, mapped behavior of plants, brain activity and insect movement.
Masaoka received a BA in Music from San Francisco State University, and received an M.A. in Music Composition from Mills College in 1994, studying with Alvin Curran. She studied independently with Suenobu Togi, a Gagaku Imperial Court master musician, and under his tutelage was the director of the San Francisco Gagaku Society for seven years.  She has also studied koto since the 1980s with both the Chikushi and Sawai Schools. 
In addition to formal studies in Western and Japanese music, she has worked with Cecil Taylor, Steve Coleman, and Ornette Coleman and Pauline Oliveros, wherein she has developed an evolving, expansive approach to the disciplines of sound, composition and music.  Much of her work considers the relationship of sounds in everyday life, natural and manmade sounds in specific environments, and the physical and phenomenological aspects of sound and performance. 
She been commissioned by and worked with Bang on a Can All-Stars, Kathleen Supove, Volti, ROVA, Piedmont Choirs and the San Francisco Chorale Society, SO Percussion, Joan Jeanrenaud (formerly of Kronos), and have been presented at Merkin Hall, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, The Miller Theater, Ircam. Residencies include Headlands Center for the Arts, Steim, the Centre for Contemporary Art, Warsaw. She is currently creating a piece for percussion, piano, cello and violin for Either/Or to be performed in 2013. 
She has been the recipient of the Alpert Award in the Arts, an Asian Cultural Council Japan Fellowship, a Wattis Fellowship, an Other Minds Residency, a Gerbode Fellowship, an NEA and the MAP Fund.  Since 2003 she taught in the Music/Sound Department of the Milton Avery School of the Arts at Bard College, and was an adjunct lecturer in Music Composition at NYU in 2012.

About Piece:

If you find yourself kayaking on a lake near the Fukushima Nuclear Plant that was damaged during the Earthquake in Japan, is it fun or perilous? Maybe a bit of both? Crazy?  My imagination went wild when my friend invited me kayaking there, and a combination of thoughts both horrific and mundane ensued.  What could possibly happen kayaking near the “other mountain?” This orchestral segment takes one through this imagined kayak ride.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Miya Masaoka's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute La Jolla Symphony

Conductor: Steven Schick

Date of reading: 09/20/2013

MARSCHAK, Daniel

Two Rivers

2013

7:30

Daniel MARSCHAK

Two Rivers

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 7:30

Instrumentation:

2*2*22.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Daniel Francis Marschak (b. 1986) is a Los Angeles-based composer, jazz pianist, and educator. His music reflects his love and familiarity of both improvised music and contemporary classical music, and tends to push the boundaries of extended harmonic and improvisatory approaches to composition. He has written works for a variety of ensembles and instrumentations, from solo percussionist to full orchestra. 
 In 2012, Marschak earned his masters degree in music composition from UCLA (where he also completed B.A.’s in both composition and jazz piano in 2009). At UCLA, he studied composition with Paul Chihara, Ian Krouse, David Lefkowitz, and James Newton, and jazz piano with Tom Rainier and Tamir Hendelman. He has also had the opportunity to compose for the UCLA Philharmonia, the UCLA Chorale, and the UCLA Wind Ensemble.
 Marschak’s debut album Likewise (2010) was heralded as “adventurous and well developed” by Lalo Schifrin. Steering clear of conventional formats, the album explores an array of genres, instrumentations, and textures, while maintaining a unique compositional sensibility. 
 As a pianist, Marschak has performed with a variety of respected musicians; including Ambrose Akinmusare, Hitomi Oba, Kalil Wilson, and the UCLA Contemporary Large Ensemble (under the direction of Kenny Burrell and James Newton). He continues to perform with his ensemble in notable venues such as Yoshi’s, the Jazz Bakery, and the Central Avenue Jazz Festival.
Marschak also maintains an interest in music for visual media, and has scored several short films. In 2011, he co-founded Well Versed Productions, a music composition/production company, to start developing that side of his musical identity.
 In addition to his career as a composer/performer, Marschak is currently teaching a music theory class at UCLA, which approaches theory from the standpoints of not only classical music, but also jazz, pop, and world styles.    

About Piece:

Two Rivers is a single-movement work, which is inspired by the life my grandfather, Jacob Marschak who passed away long before I was born. Jacob (known affectionately as Jascha) was born in Kiev, Ukraine to a Jewish family in 1898. According to his memoirs, Kiev was a city with two rivers: “The river Dnieper overflows the lowlands every spring, and the Slobodka, on the opposite side, is completely flooded”. Something about the image of these two rivers coexisting in the same city, each with its own path and character, reminds me of the trajectory of his life, and also seemed like an elegant structure for a piece.

As a young man, Jascha became active in the Menshevik Party (the social democratic party). In his memoirs, he recounts struggles with Anti-Semitism and political persecution. He even served two months in a Czarist prison for political agitation. When the communists started to consolidate their power, he left Kiev for the Caucasus. There, though barely twenty, he served briefly as Minister of Labor in a short-lived  autonomous republic.  After some narrow escapes, he emigrated to Germany and began building his life as a scholar. He fled the Nazis for England in 1933 and his career flourished at Oxford. Various professorships kept leading the family west: to New York, Chicago, New Haven, and finally Los Angeles. 

Jascha managed to find his way to a stable and fulfilling life, while few of his friends and family back home could say the same. There is a clear dichotomy then, between his early life in Russia and Germany, and his life in England and America, and I am attempting to represent the two very different ‘rivers’ in my music. 

The first half (‘river’) of the piece is in a constant state of flux. Beginning with the opening jagged gesture, each passage seems to lead somewhere significant, but never settles on anything for very long. We hear moments of sorrowful blues, pessimistic harmonies, and even a hint of mournful klezmer from a solo clarinet.

In contrast, after a blues-infused introduction, the second ‘river’ is much more playful and rollicking. The jagged opening gesture is reharmonized and given a jazz-tinged treatment while the harmony seems hopeful and optimistic. 

In composing the piece, I was hoping to ignite some kind of connection to this great man I never had the fortune to meet. And while we are separated by time and space, we share a bloodline, and I do feel a curious new way of identifying with him through my compositional process.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute La Jolla Symphony

Conductor: Steven Schick

Date of reading: 09/20/2013

MARENBERG, David

The Abyssal Zone

2012

11:30

David MARENBERG

The Abyssal Zone

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 11:30

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+2perc.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

David Marenberg is a Los Angeles-born concert and multimedia composer living in New York.  He obtained his undergraduate degree in music composition at Amherst College, where he won the Eric Sundquist Prize for his first symphony.  He recently completed his Master’s Degree in Scoring for Film and Multimedia at NYU Steinhardt.  His Ave Maria was performed at Amherst’s 2010 commencement, and his overture piece, Miasma, debuted to critical acclaim by the NYUSO.  Additionally, he was selected to participate in the film scoring workshop at the Aspen Music Festival in 2010.   David also became one of the Songwriters Hall of Fame’s Best New Songwriters of 2011 with his single, We’ll Catch Fire.   His orhcestral style infuses turn-of-the-century impressionist aesthetics with modern tropes of sound design and electroacoustic effect.  He owes a great deal to his compositional mentors at Amherst and NYU, whose guidance has given him the tools to pursue music from all angles.  David credits Eric Sawyer, David Spear, and Marc Antonio Consoli for helping him find his concert voice.

About Piece:

The bottom of the ocean is one of the few places on Earth that remains largely unexplored.  Deep down in the Abyssal Zone, 13,000 feet below the surface, a strange menagerie of marine life manages to survive the crushing ocean pressures and freezing temperatures.  Shrouded in total darkness, bioluminescent creatures thrive on geothermal vents, while large-jawed anglerfish and giant squid sift through the sediment for food. On the 23rd of January, 1960, the Swiss research bathyscaphe Trieste became the first (and only) manned vessel to reach an area of the zone known as the Challenger Deep. 
The Abyssal Zone is a monument to explorers of the unknown, a slow descent into a region filled with beauty that defies its inhospitable landscape.  Safe within the bathyscaphe, the listener is witness to the marvelous and dangerous deep.   
At the same time, it pays homage to other musical explorers who took the plunge into uncharted depths.  Harmonically and formally, the piece mirrors the voyage of the Trieste, descending from the familiar to the bizarre and back again.  The primary theme is a scalar descent of two perfect fourths, and its contour generates most of the harmonic material of the piece.   While writing The Abyssal Zone, I held to my belief that a composer’s responsibility is not simply to explore uncharted waters but to “report back” in such a way that the listener can best imagine the journey for his or herself.  An effective storyteller plays to the strengths of the psyche, and the human imagination responds best to contrast, to expectation and to surprise.  The hope is that the audience will imagine a more vivid Challenger Deep with the aid of the orchestra.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/23/2012

LINDSAY, Erica

Inner Dialogue

2011

7:40

Erica LINDSAY

Inner Dialogue

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 7:40

Instrumentation:

2221.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Tenor saxophonist, Erica Lindsay currently performs with her own quartet, with Sumi Tonooka, the Jeff Siegel Quartet, Oliver Lake Big Band, Baikida Carroll Quintet, Howard Johnson’s Hojo 5 and the San Francisco-based group, Trace Elements. She has two new releases out, “Initiation,” and “Yes, Live at the Rosendale Café, ” and two upcoming recordings on the Artist Recording Collective label. 
A San Francisco native, Lindsay’s spent her early years in Europe where she studied with pianist Mal Waldron. After studying at Berklee College of Music she began her professional career in Europe, then moving to New York City where she began touring internationally with Melba Liston & Co. During this time she performed with many jazz legends: Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, Al Grey, Mary Lou Williams and others. After leaving Melba Liston’s group, Lindsay performed with other legendary leaders such as Mc Coy Tyner, Clifford Jordon, Reggie Workman, George Gruntz and Amira Baraka – at Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher, Merkin Hall, La Mama Theatre, and Town Hall. While performing in New York City, she also pursued her academic interests and received a degree from New York University. Upon moving to Woodstock, NY, Lindsay became involved in performance art, and has since collaborated with poet/playwright Carl Hancock-Rux, poets Janine Vega, Janice King, Mikhail Horowitz and painter Nancy Ostrowski. She composed the book for two off-Broadway plays, Carl Hancock-Rux’s  “Song of Sad Young Men,” and John Carter’s “Feed the Beast,” and has also written for television (“Tales from the Darkside”) and modern dance. She is a featured artist in Sally Placksin’s book, “American Women in Jazz.”  Her composition credits include a large catalogue of jazz quartet/quintet pieces, as well as a jazz vocal catalogue, a series of ee cummings poems set to music and, “Modal Landscapes,” composed for jazz quartet and string orchestra. Her earlier discography includes, her first release on Candid Records, “Dreamer;” Baikida Carroll’s “Door of the Cage and “Marionettes on a Wire;” and Oliver Lake’s Big Band recording, “Cloth.” She currently resides in Rosendale, New York and teaches at Bard College.

About Piece:

In this piece I tried to follow the narrative of an idea, first from the initial thought, and then flowing through all of the inner dialogue that invariably ensues (the questioning, the doubt, the enthusiasm, the certainty etc) before it gains enough momentum to manifest in actual physical form. In the process of following this trajectory, my challenge was to keep an improvisational flow through the sometimes quickly changing moods and get through to the end within the time frame of five to six minutes. By far, the most challenging aspect of composing this piece was the time limit, the creative tension created by this limitation I am sure helped shape the dynamics of the piece.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Erica Lindsay's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

LINDSAY, Erica

Mantra

2014

15:50

Erica LINDSAY

Mantra

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 15:50

Instrumentation:

3222.4331.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Tenor saxophonist, Erica Lindsay currently performs with her own quartet, with Sumi Tonooka, the Jeff Siegel Quartet, Oliver Lake Big Band, Baikida Carroll Quintet, Howard Johnson’s Hojo 5 and the San Francisco-based group, Trace Elements. She has two new releases out, “Initiation,” and “Yes, Live at the Rosendale Café, ” and two upcoming recordings on the Artist Recording Collective label. 
A San Francisco native, Lindsay’s spent her early years in Europe where she studied with pianist Mal Waldron. After studying at Berklee College of Music she began her professional career in Europe, then moving to New York City where she began touring internationally with Melba Liston & Co. During this time she performed with many jazz legends: Dizzy Gillespie, Joe Williams, Al Grey, Mary Lou Williams and others. After leaving Melba Liston’s group, Lindsay performed with other legendary leaders such as Mc Coy Tyner, Clifford Jordon, Reggie Workman, George Gruntz and Amira Baraka – at Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher, Merkin Hall, La Mama Theatre, and Town Hall. While performing in New York City, she also pursued her academic interests and received a degree from New York University. Upon moving to Woodstock, NY, Lindsay became involved in performance art, and has since collaborated with poet/playwright Carl Hancock-Rux, poets Janine Vega, Janice King, Mikhail Horowitz and painter Nancy Ostrowski. She composed the book for two off-Broadway plays, Carl Hancock-Rux’s  “Song of Sad Young Men,” and John Carter’s “Feed the Beast,” and has also written for television (“Tales from the Darkside”) and modern dance. She is a featured artist in Sally Placksin’s book, “American Women in Jazz.”  Her composition credits include a large catalogue of jazz quartet/quintet pieces, as well as a jazz vocal catalogue, a series of ee cummings poems set to music and, “Modal Landscapes,” composed for jazz quartet and string orchestra. Her earlier discography includes, her first release on Candid Records, “Dreamer;” Baikida Carroll’s “Door of the Cage and “Marionettes on a Wire;” and Oliver Lake’s Big Band recording, “Cloth.” She currently resides in Rosendale, New York and teaches at Bard College.

About Piece:

This piece is a musical expression of the process of meditating on a mantra. Although the mantra – a three note repeated theme - is continuous (with a distracting theme disrupting
the meditative pace at certain points) the varying harmonic colors help describe the various moods and shadings of mental thought that unfolds as the meditation progresses.
Beginning with a deep meditative pulse and ending with the jubilation of being released from the world of the body, enlightenment is achieved.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Erica Lindsay's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Detroit Symphony Orchestra Classical Roots Readings

Conductor: Leonard Slatkin

Date of reading: 03/09/2014

LINDSAY, Eric

Sambas Riscados

2010

6:10

Eric LINDSAY

Sambas Riscados

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 6:10

Instrumentation:

3333.4221.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Described as “a rising star still in his 20’s” (Benjamin Frandzel, San Francisco Classical Voice) and “one of America’s most exciting composers under 30” (Del Sol String Quartet), Eric Lindsay is an accomplished composer, pianist and teacher recently relocated from Los Angeles to Bloomington, IN. Eric's music defies easy categorization, particularly with regard to pulse and rhythm, and frequently plays upon the themes of style synthesis and the reinterpretation of tradition. Eric’s scores are published and distributed through Peermusic Ltd. and the Theodore Presser Company, making him the youngest composer to be published in Peermusic’s New Voices Series.
Born in Santa Cruz in 1980 and raised on Whidbey Island, WA, Eric began composing at age nine. He holds composition degrees from Indiana University-Bloomington and the University of Southern California, as well as studies at King’s College in London. His past instructors include Donald Crockett, Morten Lauridsen, P.Q. Phan, Claude Baker, and Sydney Hodkinson. Also an avid performer, Eric has extensive experience as an oboist, vocalist and pianist, including performances with the Seattle Symphony, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the Saratoga Chamber Players, the IU New Music Ensemble and Philharmonic Orchestra.
Eric is the recipient of several national honors, including a 2009 commissioning grant from the Serge Koussevitsky Music Foundation, as well as awards from ASCAP, The Society of Composers Inc., the Aspen Music Festival, Volti’s Choral Arts Laboratory, the Truman State/MACRO Competition, the Georgina Joshi Foundation and the Thornton School of Music. The 2008 revision to his rambunctious orchestral work, Darkness Made Visible, recently received its premiere under the baton of Marin Alsop opening night at the 2008 Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music. Eric is also working with the San Francisco-based ADORNO Ensemble on a commission for their 2010-2011 season. Eric is currently pursuing his DM in composition at Indiana University-Bloomington. 

About Piece:

No American city has as central a place in music history as New York City, serving as the birthplace of both salsa and hip hop, as well as a thriving home for jazz, rock and blues for over 100 years. The city’s culture, a confluence of nationalities from around the world, has produced vital folk music scenes across the five boroughs, each informing the city’s listeners with music and dance traditions from both locally grown and far-away cultures. New York’s Brazilian population, concentrated largely in Astoria and Manhattan’s Rua 46, is one such community that is becoming an increasingly vital part of New York’s cultural landscape. With Brazilian Day reportedly drawing over 1 million people into the city last year, many can identify with the impromptu formations of an intricate, ebullient samba batucada on the corners of city blocks, where amateur musicians, whether rich or poor, black or brown or white, pick up instruments—a drum, a scraper, a shaker—to create grooves enviable by many professional bands in other parts of the world. Such percussion jams often elicit the participation of nearby amateur singers and dancers.  This shared music can go on for hours.

The strength of community that is formed by the creation of music such as the samba is perhaps one of the most distinguishing trademarks of Brazilian music, and is of particular import to any major metropolis where fostering a sense of community will help drive citywide habits of mind. With Mayor Bloomberg enacting Climate Week to kick-start collaboration between the public, organizations, and private businesses to tackle climate change, as well as the citywide efforts of GreeNYC to encourage civic engagement with regard to environmental stewardship, the music of the samba acts as a symbol of combined effort—one where people of all backgrounds and abilities can play a small part in a far-reaching whole, as well as one that, through the thunder of drums, song and dance, predicts a more collective, brighter New York. 

Samba Koocho Hairy Boocho illuminates many qualities of the samba genre—itself a result of five centuries of Portuguese, African, and Amerindian rhythms, dances, and harmonies working together—to symbolize the powerful results of shared ideas.  The piece blends Latin rhythms with African music styles, exploding with the sounds of drums and bright instrumentation, and highlights the interplay between the up-tempo duple beat and the three dance steps that are performed in each bar of a samba, creating a mélange of both alternating and simultaneous duple and triple meters. The resulting samba is decidedly of the City: with music that erupts with the blare of horns, moves urgently from start to finish, and contains as its foundation a theme that bumps, shouts, leaps, ducks underneath, reacts to others, and explodes into a million pieces all without losing its identity or sacrificing its uniqueness of spirit.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Eric Lindsay's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

LIN, Ching-Mei

Reflections of the Seasons

2010

13:20

Ching-Mei LIN

Reflections of the Seasons

Year Composed: 2010

Timing (in minutes): 13:20

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Ching-Mei Lin has composed for soloists and ensembles in North America, Europe, and Asia. Her pieces have been performed at the Aspen Music Festival, Bowdoin Music Festival, Society of Composers, Inc. Conference, and played by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra, and others. Ms. Lin was the sole recipient of the String Quartet award at the Emerging Composers Competition in 2009, and has received numerous other distinctions, including the Government Literary and Artistic Creation Award, Taiwan (2005, 2006, and 2009); Third Place in the Sun River Prize, China (2006); ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award (2005); and First Prize in the NACUSA Young Composers Competition (2002). As the overall prizewinner in the 2008 “New Music on the Block” competition sponsored by Block M Records, her music will be made available online at the iTunes Music Store. Upon graduating from the National Taiwan Normal University, Ms. Lin was awarded a government sponsorship for overseas study. She holds a masters of music degree in composition from the Eastman School of Music, and recently completed a doctor of musical arts degree at the University of Michigan. She has studied composition with Evan Chambers, Bright Sheng, William Bolcom, David Liptak, Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon, and Gordon Chin. Lin is also an active pianist, improviser, and collaborator.

About Piece:

Love and death, are two revolving themes in the novels of Japanese writer Haruki Murakami, particularly in his Norwegian Wood and Kafka on the Shore.  In his seductive and enigmatic narration, death is sorrow but also beautiful.  I am deeply impressed by his stories and decided to write a series of works in 2008.  Beyond the Life is the title given to this series of works. But it is by no means that I am depicting any scene of his story in the music, indeed, the music is a mystical reflection upon the reading experiences.  The title means the death of a beloved one has become part of another's life; death and life are not in opposite direction, indeed the death of a beloved one would somehow determine how the people around live their lives.
The music divides into four sections. The opening section starts with a wistful oboe melody, representing the longing for a beloved but lost one.  Two motives from this melody will be further developed and transformed in the later sections.  There is a transition leading to an exciting section that develops rhythmically by means of changing meters and metric modulations, and it contrasts with the pervious section as well as the next one, which is quite static and features a transparent orchestral texture and color. In the final section, materials form the second section comes back, and getting  more intensified.  When the music is approaching its climax, a vibrant orchestral texture is created by accelerating the tempo, and increasing the dynamics and musical activities. 
The oboe melody comes back in the coda, the music ends with a surprising chord, letting the  tension suspended in the mid air.
Though in the same series, Beyond the Life I,  which is scored for solo violin, only shares the same philosophical concept with Beyond the Life II.  These two works are not required to perform side by side, and should be musically treated as independent works. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ching-Mei Lin's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Pioneer Valley Symphony Reading

Conductor: Paul Phillips

Date of reading: 04/18/2010

LIN, Pin Hsin

Symphony No. 3

2012

8:20

Pin Hsin LIN

Symphony No. 3

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 8:20

Instrumentation:

3*3*3*3.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Lyrical composer Pin Hsin Lin tells stories through her music. Her composition "Enchanting Shadow" for piano trio won the 2006 first prize at the premiere national competition for composers, the Centrum Chamber Music Composer’s Competition at Washington State. Lin was featured in the Festival’s ‘Experience Magazine’ Spring 2007 issue. Lin’s awards include two Peabody Career Development Grants 2006 and 2008; two American Music Center’s Composer Assistance Grants 2006 and 2008, and scholarships from Bowdoin and St. Magnus. Her compositional foresight extends into experimental collaborative works ranging from dancers to computer scientists. She is currently a doctoral student in composition at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she studies with Erik Lund, Zack Browning, Steven Taylor, Reynold Tharp, and Scott Wyatt. She grew up in Kaohsiung and Taipei, Taiwan. She received her Master degree in Composition at the Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University and her Bachelor degree in Composition at Roosevelt University. Her music has been performed in England, Tucson, Chicago, Baltimore, New York, Washington, Kentucky, Brunswick, and Champaign-Urbana.

About Piece:

Symphony No. 3 was written in memory of my father, who passed away two years ago. It is a one-movement work containing several sections of contrasting character, including three primary melodic structural elements and textural materials. I first composed the three melodic materials, which together symbolize my complex feelings about missing my father. The intensely dramatic middle sections depict the time that I and other family members flew back to Taiwan to be with him during his treatment. This process was a precious journey for my family, during which we encountered sadness and depression. The three primary ideas are linked to three recurring melodic themes: the triplet pattern by woodwinds (doubled by piano), the long lyric contour by the strings, and the lively repetitive 16th-note rhythm. These three thematic materials are juxtaposed, intertwined, and interlaced with one other throughout. Those sixteenth-note figures function as decoration interwoven with the other two themes. In the middle sections, I also added new pitch material inspired by the Taiwanese folksong, Gao Shan Qing (???, or The Green, High Mountain). Finally, the music of the last section turns to a more peaceful mood, in which I depict my family's gratitude for the time we spent together.
 
In sum, Symphony No. 3 makes ample use of three primary materials, to create rhythmic vitality, complex textures, multiple melodic contours, and dramatic dynamic changes, all taking place concurrently.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Pin Hsin Lin's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/02/2012

LIM, Elizabeth

Disharmony of the Spheres

2012

9:15

Elizabeth LIM

Disharmony of the Spheres

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 9:15

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.3perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Elizabeth Lim is a second-year doctoral candidate at the Juilliard School, where she is studying composition with Dr. Robert Beaser. Born in San Francisco, Elizabeth began composing at age five. Her music, noted for its unique expressiveness and verve, has been widely performed throughout the United States, Europe, and Asia and received honors and recognition from ASCAP, BMI, the Society of Composers, Inc. (SCI), the National Association of Composers, USA (NACUSA), the New England Philharmonic, and the Society for New Music, among others.
Elizabeth completed her undergraduate studies at Harvard University, where she was awarded the Hugh F. MacColl Prize in composition, the John Green Fellowship in composition, the Louis Sudler Prize in the Arts, and during her senior year, she was named one of her class’s “Most Outstanding Seniors in the Arts.” She has been a composer-in-residence with the Berkeley Symphony Orchestra as part of the Under Construction concert series, and other accomplishments include commissions and awards from the Alabama Orchestra Association, the Albany Symphony’s Composer-to-Center-Stage program, Palo Alto Youth-to-Youth Commissioning Project, Bellevue Youth Symphony Orchestra Composers Competition, as well as from the first national Iron Composer Competition, hosted by the University of Nebraska’s Artsaha. Additionally, Elizabeth was named winner of the annual Juilliard Orchestra Composition Competition, and her work for orchestra, Paranoia, was conducted by Jeffrey Milarsky for performance in the Alice Tully Hall in April 2009.

About Piece:

Since the time I first began composing, I had a predilection for writing dance music. In fact, one of my earliest compositions for orchestra paid homage to the Viennese waltzes so popular during the fin-de-siècle and attempted to deconstruct the waltz into something of my own. Disharmony of the Spheres is my more mature take on a similar idea. Written during the fall of 2011, Disharmony is the fifth and final movement of my second symphony. It borrows the traditional Scherzo and Trio form but quickly devolves into something entirely different. The “scherzo” section resembles a danse macabre, and the “trio” is ethereal and light; however the delineation between the two sections disintegrates as themes from the “scherzo” and “trio” collide. This collision sets a course for chaos, redirecting the classical “harmony of the spheres” to disharmony. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Elizabeth Lim's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/23/2012

LI, Yuan-Chen

On Aldebaran

2015

7:40

Yuan-Chen LI

On Aldebaran

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 7:40

Instrumentation:

2*2*22.2200.2perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Yuan-Chen Li’s musical style and language is cultivated through a sensitivity to human expression. Her Taiwanese upbringing, a Buddhist spirit, Western musical knowledge, and the symbolic aspects of nature and art, have inspired her work. The sense of time and momentum in her music is not easily categorized as purely classical or contemporary.  Her appreciation of principles about transformation, often found in classical Chinese poetry, brings an inclusiveness to modern music valuing both discipline and emancipation.

The range of Li’s repertoire extends from large-scale force, such as orchestra and concerto to more sensitive chamber and solo music. Western and Chinese instruments have been used in selected pieces: “Awakening” premiered by Tokyo Philharmonia Orchestra (2003), “Intermezzo: SHANG” commissioned by National Symphony Orchestra (Taiwan) premiered by Maestro Nicholas Milton (2012), the Guzheng concerto “Hovering in the Air” receiving an Israeli premiere during the conference and festival of Asian Composers’ League (2012), and “Spell” for solo saxophone performed by acclaimed saxophonist Timothy McAllister at Northwestern University New Music Conference (2014).  Digitally cataloged in the classical score library by Alexander Street Press, Li’s works have been programmed and researched by musicians and musicologists around the world. 

Li holds a B.A. and M.A. in music composition and theory from the Taipei National University of the Arts (Taiwan) and an Artist Diploma from the Yale University School of Music. She is completing a Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, studying composition with Marta Ptaszynska and orchestration with conductor Cliff Colnot. Relevant honors, awards, and grants include Artist Residency at Cite Internationale des Arts, Jacob Druckman Scholarship, University of Chicago Scholarship, and National Culture and Arts Foundation (Taiwan). For more information please visit http://yuanchenli.wordpress.com/

About Piece:

The composer imagines a journey under the celestial sky. The reddish star of Aldebaran, among many, symbolizes eternity. The traveler follows it, but depending on the altitude and the latitude, the traveler’s viewpoint during his ongoing journey in relation to the star has never been the same. Ever changing is therefore the nature of unchanging.

The focal pitch of On Aldebaran is F#. Its pitch identity is ambiguous and arbitrary, implied by the constant conflict among multiple sets of harmonic patterns in different rhythms moving alongside. The tone color of F# is composed by mixed ensemble, either well blended or extremely contrasted. The form of the piece is also open to interpretation, not limited to be perceived as a composed-through movement or multiple sections. On Aldebaran draws from the composer’s memory of the tune from Nan-quan music and tributes to Japanese Gagaku. The orchestration grants the harmony a greater role to form stratum, eventually becomes a confluence of everything without boundaries.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Yuan-Chen Li's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Stefan Sanders

Date of reading: 02/11/2015

LAURELLO, Michael

Promises

2015

8:40

Michael LAURELLO

Promises

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 8:40

Instrumentation:

2*222.2220.timp+1.pno.str

About Composer:

Michael Laurello is an American composer and pianist. He has written for ensembles and soloists such as S? Percussion (Brooklyn, NY), Sandbox Percussion (Brooklyn, NY), the Yale Percussion Group, the Yale
Philharmonia, Sound Icon (Boston, MA), the 15.19ensemble (Pavia, Italy), NotaRiotous/The Boston Microtonal Society, guitarist Flavio Virzì, soprano Sarah Pelletier, pianist/composer John McDonald, and clarinetist and linguist/music theorist Ray Jackendoff. Upcoming collaborations include an evening-length work for the Triplepoint Trio (New Haven, CT), made possible through an artist residency at the Avaloch Farm Music Institute (Summer 2015).
 
Laurello is an Artist Diploma candidate in composition at the Yale School of Music, where he received the Jacob Druckman Scholarship and the Rena Greenwald Memorial Scholarship for 2014-15. His primary composition teachers at Yale are David Lang, Martin Bresnick, and Christopher Theofanidis. He holds an M.A. in composition from Tufts University, where he studied under John McDonald, and a B.Mus. in music synthesis (electronic production and design) from the Berklee College of Music. Recent honors include a commission from the American Composers Forum and an Emerging Artist Award from the St. Botolph Club Foundation (Boston, MA). He has attended composition festivals at highSCORE (Pavia, Italy) and Etchings (Auvillar, France).

In addition to his work as a composer and performer, Laurello is a recording engineer and a teaching fellow at Yale University.

About Piece:

When I started writing Promises in September of 2014, I imagined the orchestra as an enormous machine relentlessly chugging away to accomplish some sort of task, or moving towards a goal of some kind. But, even as I got a little deeper into composing the piece, I still wasn’t sure what the goal was. Should the music grow bigger? Should it get smaller and smaller? Should it push so hard that it breaks apart? Eventually one of my teachers said to me: “This music seems like it’s promising something. You just have to decide whether or not it’s going to break its promise.” This made me think not only about the concept of a musical promise, but also about some of the promises that I’ve kept and those that I’ve broken in my life. The music started to represent something more personal and profound, and I composed the bulk of the piece with these thoughts in mind. In the end, I don’t know whether the piece keeps its promise, but I like to think it does.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony New Music Reading

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/03/2015

LAUBROCK, Ingrid

Vogelfrei

2013

9:05

Ingrid LAUBROCK

Vogelfrei

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 9:05

Instrumentation:

2*222.2220.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Originally from Germany, Ingrid Laubrock lived  in the UK from 1989 - 2009 and is since then residing in Brooklyn. She studied Jazz at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama (London), saxophone with Jean Toussaint and David Liebman and composition with pianist/composer Myra Melford.
Ingrid performed and recorded with: Anthony Braxton, Dave Douglas, Kenny Wheeler, Jason Moran,Tim Berne, Mark Helias, Michael Formanek, Mary Halvorson, Tyshawn Sorey, Evan Parker, Steve Beresford, John Edwards,Veryan Weston, Luc Ex,Django Bates’ Human Chain,The Continuum Ensemble and others.
As part of the F-ire Collective, she won the BBC Jazz Award for Innovation in 2004,was nominated for the BBC Jazz Award for ‘Rising Star’ in 2005 and won a Fellowship in Jazz Composition by the Arts Foundation in 2006. She won the 2009 SWR German Radio Jazz Prize the and was one of the final nominees for the 2009 Westfalen Jazz Preis . In 2011 Ingrid was commissioned to compose and record for the prestigious New-Jazz Meeting, an annual production by the SWR. Her current groups are Anti-House,Sleepthief, Ingrid Laubrock Orchestra and and the collaboration Paradoxical Frog with pianist Kris Davis and drummer Tyshawn Sorey.

About Piece:

The original inspiration for my piece, Vogelfrei, were photos I took of the various shapes and patters formed by overground train electrical wires. In 2012 I spent several months in Moers/Germany as an artist in residence. Moers is a town on the edge of the Ruhr valley, an old industrial and coal mining region which has an extensive rail network. I love the seemingly endless combinations of the electrical wires and connectors suspended in the air which are interrupted by pylons and masts and I tried to somewhat capture this texture in my composition.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Oliver Hagen

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

LASH, Hannah

2010

Hannah LASH

Year Composed:

Timing (in minutes):

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Hailed by the New York Times as “striking and resourceful…handsomely brooding,” Hannah Lash’s music has been performed at the Times Center in Manhattan, the Chicago Art Institute, Tanglewood Music Center, Harvard University, The Chelsea Art Museum, and on the American Opera Project’s stage in New York City. Commissions include The Fromm Foundation, the Boston Symphony Orchestra, the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, Carnegie Hall, Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music, American Composers Orchestra, The Naumburg Foundation, The Orpheus Duo, The Howard Hanson Foundation’s Commissioning Fund, Case Western Reserve’s University Circle Wind Ensemble, MAYA, the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, the Arditti Quartet, the Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival and the Aspen Music Festival and School, among many others.

Lash has received numerous honors and prizes, including the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Fromm Foundation Commission, a fellowship from Yaddo Artist Colony, the Naumburg Prize in Composition, the Barnard Rogers Prize in Composition, the Bernard and Rose Sernoffsky Prize in Composition, and numerous academic awards. Her orchestral work Furthermore was selected by the American Composers Orchestra for the 2010 Underwood New Music Readings. Her chamber opera, Blood Rose, was presented by New York City Opera’s VOX in the spring of 2011.

New York Times music critic Steve Smith praised Lash’s work for the JACK Quartet, Frayed: “Ms. Lash’s compact sequence of pale brush strokes, ghostly keening and punchy outbursts was striking and resourceful; you hoped to hear it again…”  Esteemed music critic Bruce Hodges lauded Lash’s piece Stalk for solo harp as being “appealing…florid, and introspective.”

In addition to performances of her music in the USA, Lash’s music is well known internationally. In April of 2008, her string quartet Four Still was performed in Kyev in the Ukraine’s largest international new music festival, “Musical Premieres of the Season,” curated by Carson Cooman. In the summer of 2010, her piece Unclose was premiered by members of Eighth Blackbird at the MusicX festival in Blonay, Switzerland.

Recent premieres include Three Shades Without Angles, for flute, viola and harp, by the Boston Symphony Chamber Players, Pulse-space, for string quartet, by the Flux Quartet, as well as several new orchestral works: Eating Flowers, for the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music, Nymphs, for the Alabama Symphony Orchestra, and This Ease, for the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra. In October 2015, the American Composers Orchestra premiered Lash’s Concerto for Harp and Chamber Orchestra, conducted by George Manahan and with Lash as soloist. Other recent premieres include God Music Bug Music in January 2011 with the Minnesota Orchestra, the monodrama Stoned Prince by New York based ensemble Load Bang in April 2013, Subtilior Lamento with the Da Capo Chamber Players at Carnegie Hall in 2012, and Glockenliebe, for three glockenspiels, with Talujon Percussion in December 2012. Her 2011 orchestral work, Hush, was featured on the Los Angeles Philharmonic’s Brooklyn Festival in April of 2013. Upcoming premieres include a new chamber opera, Beowulf, commissioned by Guerilla Opera, and a new work for Loadbang, commissioned by Columbia University’s Miller Theatre.

Lash obtained her Ph.D in Composition from Harvard University in 2010. She has held teaching positions at Harvard University (Teaching Fellow), at Alfred University (Guest Professor of Composition), and currently serves on the composition faculty at Yale University School of Music.

About Piece:


                        

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Hannah Lash's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

LAM, Angel

In Search of Seasons

2009

13:00

Angel LAM

In Search of Seasons

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 13:00

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Angel Lam is a young artist who uses the beauty of soundscape and instrumentation to express detailed and refined emotions in her music.  In her works, she continually seeks to retell the beauty she finds in everyday life. 

Ms. Lam grew up in Hong Kong and Los Angeles.  Her compositions have been performed throughout the United States and in many major cities around the world. She is a two-time winner of the Carnegie Hall emerging composer commission. She first received the award in 2005-06, where she worked with Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Project, and then again in 2006-07, where she worked with Grammy Award winning composer Osvaldo Golijov and prolific vocalist Dawn Upshaw. These two collaborations, together with the Weill Music Institute at Carnegie Hall, culminated in two Carnegie Hall premieres of her work in September 2006 and April 2007. Most recently, her composition Empty Mountain, Spirit Rain was selected to be on the touring repertoire of Yo Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, who toured with her piece in the United States, Canada, China, Japan and Switzerland's Lucerne Festival in 2007-2009. This work was released by Sony/BMG on Silk Road Ensemble's CD "New Impossibilities".*

About Piece:

As we grow older, we start to associate seasons with people that we once knew, events in the past, and most of all, memories.As time goes by, we start to lose track of the seasons passing by us, and we forget the magic of seasonal changes, how ravishing it was to experience the first warm fragrance of spring from a deep, contemplative winter, the pulsating liveliness of summer, the soft caress of southern tropical winds on our bare skin, the resistance of autumn's arrival in summer's presence, and the dance of golden and scarlet leaves in November, its wind replete with memories of the past. Seasonal changes mark the passing of time- to witness the majesty of seasons on our own is not enough, we have a need to share it with someone, to witness together the beauty and glory in each other's life.

- Have you found your favorite season yet?"

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Angel Lam's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Colorado Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 07/17/2009

LA BARBERA, John

Morro da Babilônia

2016

8:15

John LA BARBERA

Morro da Babilônia

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 8:15

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

John La Barbera is a renowned composer/arranger who has worked in the jazz world for over four decades. He has had works performed and recorded by Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie, Mel Torme', Chaka Khan, Harry James, Bill Watrous, and Phil Woods just to name a few. John's
Grammy® nominated big band CD "On The Wild Side" along with "Fantazm" and his latest "Caravan" have been met with tremendous artistic and commercial success. In addition to his work in jazz, Mr. La Barbera has created works for diverse large ensembles and chamber orchestras. John is a Professor
Emeritus at the University of Louisville School of Music and also active as a clinician and lecturer in colleges and schools throughout the U.S. and abroad. His career has been profiled in dozens of publications and encyclopedias and his published works are considered standards in the field of jazz education.

About Piece:

While on tour in Brazil in 2001, I was given an insider's view of the infamous Morro da Babilônia Favela in Rio de Janeiro, which few outsiders could experience at that time.  The sights, sounds, and smells, and the harsh reality of the residents’ daily lives, where even a basic staple–propane–was controlled by drug lords, will stay with me always.  The dichotomy between the opulent, lush beaches of Copacabana and its poor neighbor was equally striking and haunting.  There seemed to be a predominance of natural rhythms created by the actions of the daily routines of the population. The sounds of crowded streets and alleys had a striking crescendo and diminuendo.  These easily translated into musical language and allowed me a foundation on which to build this composition.  In addition, the deep blue patches of the rooftop water reservoirs contrasted with the earthen colors of walls intersecting in asymmetrical angles suggested musical patterns and textures I have tried to capture in this work.

In this setting, the adolescent street circus performers seemed an anomaly at first, but the explanation was equally enlightening and a testimony to the human spirit and outreach.  Homeless children in high-risk situations, such as juvenile delinquents and slum-dwellers, were socially integrated into circus schools to give them a purpose and skill to lead them to more self-assurance and independence.  The revelations about the ""Children of the Candelaria"" massacre highlighted the plight of these youths and begged their presence in this composition.

The history of the Brazilian ""choro"" or ""chorinho"" is strikingly similar to that of the American jazz art form: both coming of age in the early part of the 20th century and featuring improvisation as a commonality.  Loosely translated, ""Rodas de Choro"" can mean jam session; for me, this evokes the same joy and freedom of musical expression as our native jazz.
In this work, Morro da Babilônia, I have drawn upon these memories to musically convey my emotions with these musical vignettes that, hopefully, will expand proportionally and be the embodiment of a larger work.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

KUSPA, Jordan

Iterations

2011

8:20

Jordan KUSPA

Iterations

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 8:20

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Jordan Kuspa’s music has been praised in the New York Times as “animated and melodically opulent” and “consistently alive and inspired.”  His compositions have been performed by the 21st Century Consort, the Xanthos Ensemble, Ensemble SurPlus, the Yale Philharmonia, and the Woodlands Symphony (Texas), among many others.  Jordan’s music has been performed in venues such as Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, the Kimmel Center’s Verizon Hall, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, as well as in Croatia, Denmark, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg, and Switzerland. Among his many honors, Jordan was the winner of the 2010 ISCM–League of Composers Competition, and the 2007 Robert Avalon Young Composers Competition. 
At age 16, Jordan founded the Houston Young Musicians, a group that sought to broaden interest in classical music among new listeners as well as promote the works of American and other contemporary composers.  Jordan was also co-founder and Artistic Director of the Sonus Chamber Music Society, an organization that presented an interactive concert series in the Houston museum district.  Educational and community outreach, in schools, churches, and hospitals, was a central component of each of these programs.  He has continued his community engagement work in schools across Connecticut, with programs that have included musical collaborations with students in writing, drama, and filmmaking.
Jordan was homeschooled his entire life before entering Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music.  Jordan is currently pursuing his doctorate at the Yale School of Music, where he has studied with Martin Bresnick, Ezra Laderman, Ingram Marshall, and Christopher Theofanidis.

About Piece:

Iterations opens with a blast from the Horns, sounding a jagged, syncopated motive that will become the basis of much of the musical material. The Juxtaposition of these jagged motives with lyrical passages, dissonant orchestral eruptions, and triumphant chorales, is at the heart of Iterations.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jordan Kuspa's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/04/2011

KRIEGESKOTTE, Christian

Haunting the Cepheus Flare

2009

14:10

Christian KRIEGESKOTTE

Haunting the Cepheus Flare

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 14:10

Instrumentation:

1111.1110.1perc.str

About Composer:

Christian Kriegeskotte received his Bachelor of Fine Arts (Music, Composition) from Carnegie Mellon University in 2003.  After graduation Christian moved to Los Angeles where he lived and worked in Hollywood as a copyist and music librarian for one of the industry’s foremost music preparation studios, Jo Ann Kane Music Service.  While in Hollywood, Christian contributed to feature film scores including Star Wars: Episode III, War of the Worlds, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Robots, Cars and The Interpreter as well as television scores for The Simpsons, Family Guy, King of the Hill and American Dad.  After shifting gears from entertainment back toward the arts Christian returned to his hometown of New York where he was hired by Columbia Artists Management Inc. and was quickly promoted to Associate Producer.  With CAMI, Christian assisted in producing and managing tours for artists such as Marvin Hamlisch, Betty Buckley, Joan Kwuon, Lorin Maazel and the Symphonica Toscanini, Pinchas Zukerman and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, the Georgian State Dance Company, Enrique Batiz and the State Symphony Orchestra of Mexico as well as the BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Thierry Fischer.  Christian gave his notice in June 2007 in order to return to school to pursue his masters in composition.  Presently in his fourth semester as a graduate student, Christian studies composition with Leonardo Balada and has been very active as a conductor, studying with his mentor Robert Page.  In 2009, Christian had the good fortune to work with Professor Fabien Levy of Columbia University for one month and holds Professor Levy in high regard among his teachers.  Christian has come to recognize Pittsburgh as his second home, having performed with the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh, The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Bach and the Baroque with Don Franklin and John Goldsmith at the University of Pittsburgh, The Robert Page Festival Chorus and in many Orthodox churches in the communities surrounding the city as a choral singer.  

Inspired by the arcane and mysterious, Christian devotes the majority of his time away from his music steeped in obscure literature and philosophy from around the world.  Christian is devoted to the study of the Hermetic Sciences, and the traditions of the Western Mystery Schools.  He has also branched out to find poetic and musical inspiration in the cultures of South and Mesoamerica, and in the East from Persia and the traditional spiritual and philosophical literature of China and Japan.  During the two years he lived and worked in Los Angeles, Christian studied traditional Chinese Buddhism at the Gold Wheel Sagely Monastery, an all-Chinese monastery in Highland Park, California – an experience that he feels has helped him find and shape his voice as a composer and performer.

About Piece:

Cepheus is a constellation that harbors the dark matter nebula Sh2-136, Bok globule CD230 and many other mysterious bodies and phenomena that lie some 1,200 light-years away from Earth. Haunting the Cepheus Flare is part of a greater collection of short works for varying ensembles inspired by images of outer space. The work is a collection of four miniature pieces for chamber orchestra that explores themes such as subtle variations in timbre and color caused by varying doublings of instruments, repetition and expansion, and programmatic association (as in the movements “jazz” and “counterpoint”).

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

ACO/Penn New Music Readings

Conductor: Cliff Colnot

Date of reading: 04/16/2009

KRAMARCHUK, Katarina

Shadows

2010

14:00

Katarina KRAMARCHUK

Shadows

Year Composed: 2010

Timing (in minutes): 14:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Katerina Kramarchuk was born in Kishinev, Moldova to a family of musicians. She began playing the piano and composing from an early age. She studied at the music lyceum “Ciprian Porumbescu” in Kishinev (1994–2002). In 2002 her family moved to Portland, OR, where she became interested in jazz and began composing seriously. While still in high school, Katerina was commissioned to write music for her school’s color guard team (2005), which she performed herself. The piece was also featured on KBPS All-Classical 89.9 FM in Portland. That same year, Kramarchuk was the winner of DownBeat Magazine Student Awards as a classical soloist. In 2006, she was the Arts Recognition and Talent Search (ARTS) Merit Award winner in composition. Her piece Epilogue has been performed five times in New York (Bargemusic, The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Manhattan School of Music) and Portland, OR (Sherman & Clay Pianos); it was mentioned in a review in the New York Times (July, 2008). As a pianist, Katerina has performed her music three years in a row at the popular concert “Ten Grands” in Portland. Currently a senior at Manhattan School of Music, Katerina is studying with Richard Danielpour and is a recipient of the Helen Airoff Dowling Scholarship. She has been accepted into the Curtis Institute of Music, where she will continue her studies in the 2010-11 academic year. 

About Piece:

This piece is inspired by the book of Isaiah, chapter 59, which describes the “gap’ between people and God. It has a restless energy, and, as I envisioned it, suggests an image of someone fighting to find a moment of peace amongst the turmoil that overwhelms his life. Just as he gets a glimpse of light, the struggles take over and the hero finds himself (or herself) in a climax of emotions and of possible hope. “We look for light, but all is darkness; for brightness, but we walk in deep shadows” (Isaiah 59:9)

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Pioneer Valley Symphony Reading

Conductor: Paul Phillips

Date of reading: 04/18/2010

KOVLER, Matti

Unsung Serenade

2010

10:40

Matti KOVLER

Unsung Serenade

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 10:40

Instrumentation:

2222.3221.timp+2.hrp.tape.str

About Composer:

Matti Kovler’s music has been described as “graceful” (New York Times), “notable for its pacing and bold orchestral colors” (The Boston Globe) and “part mystical, part comical” (Grade A Entrepreneurs). Recent projects included a monodrama commissioned by Carnegie Hall for the Upshaw/ Golijov Professional Training Workshop. The work, Here Comes Messiah! for soprano and chamber ensemble, was premiered at Carnegie’s Zankel Hall in 2009. 

Born in Moscow and educated in Israel and the US, Matti Kovler wrote his first opera at the age of 17.  His works have since been performed in Jerusalem, Amsterdam, Boston, Oslo and New York, by the Metropole Orchestra (Holland), Fox Studios Symphony Orchestra (Los Angeles), the Ariel Quartet (Boston) and the Brillaner Duo (Berlin). 

About Piece:

Shakespeare’s sonnet number 73 has inspired the melody, which reveals itself at the end of this piece.

SONNET 73
That time of year thou mayst in me behold ?
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang?
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, ?
Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. ?
In me thou seest the twilight of such day ?
As after sunset fadeth in the west, ?
Which by and by black night doth take away,?
Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. ?
In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire ?
That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, ?
As the death-bed whereon it must expire ?
Consumed with that which it was nourish'd by. ?   
This thou perceivest, which makes thy love more strong,?   
To love that well which thou must leave ere long.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Matti Kovler's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/22/2010

KOHEI, Mukai

Mugen

2011

13:30

Mukai KOHEI

Mugen

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 13:30

Instrumentation:

3*232.4330.timp+4.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Mukai Kôhei has studied composition at the Tokyo University of the Arts and at the Peabody Conservatory of Music where he studied composition with Nicholas Maw. He received his doctoral degree in Composition at the University of Missouri-Kansas City where he studied composition with Chen Yi, James Mobberley and Paul Rudy and piano with Karen Kushner. His works include solo, chamber and orchestral pieces using his own harmony method and musical elements of Japanese traditional music.

Mukai has won many prestigious composition awards including the JoAnn Falletta International Composition Competition, Exhibition of Japanese Composition Prize, The Foundation Orchestra International Competition, Music Teachers National Association Competition, ASCAP Raymond Hubbel Prize, Peabody Camerata Prize, Japan Society for Contemporary Music Prize, Ataka Prize, Virginia DeLillo Competition Prize and Japan Music Competition among others.

He has received commissions from prominent performers and has served as fellow composer at music events such as the Wellesley Composers Conference and the Bennington Composers Forum. Mukai has been the recipient of fellowships and scholarships such as the Japanese Government Fellowship and the UMKC Distinguished Dissertation Fellowship. He was guest composer at the Srinakarinwirot University (Bangkok, Thailand), Mannes Contemporary Music Festival and others and was a featured composer on the Chicago Symphony "Music Now" concert series in 2003. His Prelude and Allegro for marimba solo has been a repertoire piece for international marimba competitions such the Universal Marimba Competition Belgium, Thailand Marimba Competition and Japan Wind and Percussion Competition.

About Piece:

The genre of Japanese "Noh" drama that deals with dreams, illusion and phantasms is called "Mugen". Kohei's Mugen is an orchestral depiction of the surreal world where dreams and nightmares dwell and where the bounderies of reality and unreality are not clearly defined. His orchestration references the timbres of the japanese shkukahachi and gongs.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Mukai Kohei's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/04/2011

KEREKES, Paul

Timber

2012

6:45

Paul KEREKES

Timber

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 6:45

Instrumentation:

2*2*22.2220.2perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Paul Kerekes’ music is described as “striking…ecstatic…dramatic” (WQXR), “highly eloquent” (New Haven Advocate), and able to create “an almost tactile picture” (The New York Times).  His music has been performed by ensembles TwoSense, Second Instrumental Unit, Stonewall Chorale, Mannes Preparatory Division Choir, and Norfolk Contemporary Ensemble. After completing an undergraduate degree at Queens College Kerekes was invited to accompany 2012 Grammy Award winning ensemble eighth blackbird as a composer and performer at the summer festival of Music10 in Blonay, Switzerland. Prior to this experience he attended such notable programs as Yale’s New Music Workshop, California Summer Music, the Young Artists Piano Program at Tanglewood and Stony Brook Summer Music Festival. Kerekes is currently completing a masters degree at Yale School of Music under the instruction of Martin Bresnick.

About Piece:

Timber  is a macabre and hallucinatory look into the forest.  The piece begins with a mysterious and dark harmonic palette which represents dawn and awakening.  The harmonies brighten, as more daylight is revealed, and lead into a new section marked by falling chords.  The chords fall like trees, more intricately after the other leading into a slow build of string pizzicatos surging upward.  The final section finally bursts open with a jazzy flare and quickly evaporates into a dreamlike state as the temple blocks remind us of the falling chords.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Paul Kerekes's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/02/2012

KENNEDY, Martin

Siren, blind

2017

9:58

Martin KENNEDY

Siren, blind

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 9:58

Instrumentation:

3333.4330.timp.3perc.harp.pno*.str.

About Composer:

Martin Kennedy (b. 1978) began his training at Indiana University, where he received a B.M. in both Composition and Piano Performance. He went on to earn an M.M. in Composition at Indiana University and a Doctor of Musical Arts at the Juilliard School where he was a C.V. Starr Doctoral Fellow. His principal teachers in composition include Samuel Adler, Milton Babbitt, Claude Baker, David Dzubay, Don Freund, and Sydney Hodkinson. His principal teachers in piano include Jeremy Denk and Evelyne Brancart. Kennedy's music has been performed internationally by numerous artists and ensembles, including the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestra Teatro Comunale di Bologna, South Dakota Symphony Orchestra, Baton Rouge Symphony Orchestra, Wisconsin Philharmonic, Bloomington Camerata, Symphony in C, and Tuscaloosa Symphony. He is the recipient of several prestigious prizes, including the ASCAP Foundation Rudolf Nissim Prize, the '2 Agosto' International Composition Prize, a BMI Student Composer Award, five ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards, the Suzanne and Lee Ettleson prize, the ASCAP Raymond Hubbel Award, fellowships at the MacDowell and Yaddo Artist Colonies, an Aaron Copland Award, and two Indiana University Dean's Prizes in Composition. Kennedy's music is available on the Ancalagon, Anbardy, Azica, Centaur, and Riax labels and is published by Theodore Presser Company and G. Schirmer Inc.  Previously a member of the academic faculty at Washington University in St. Louis, he is currently the Director of Composition and Theory at Central Washington University in Washington State.

About Piece:

So they sent their ravishing voices out across the air and the heart inside me throbbed to listen longer.
-Homer, The Odyssey 
That voice was a lamentation. Calmer now. It's in the silence after you feel you hear. 
-James Joyce, Ulysses 
[It] is still conceivable that someone might possibly have escaped from their singing; but from their silence certainly never. 
-Franz Kafka, The Silence of the Sirens 
There are ships that sail in the periphery, invisible to temptation or desire. For such travelers, nothing is lost. No helm broken by rocks, they remain obscured by mist, marginalia to the horizon. Many would risk ravage for ecstasy, but instead they journey towards the vanishing point-swallowed by the waves of an ebbing surf, blind to those who beckon from that fatal shore.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/23/2017

KELLY, Nathan

The Legend of Pecos Bill

2011

15:00

Nathan KELLY

The Legend of Pecos Bill

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 15:00

Instrumentation:

3*3*4*3*.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Nathan Kelly is a film and concert composer and professional orchestrator.  Working in broadway, television and film, some credits include The Tony Awards, Gypsy: with Piatti LuPone, Curtains, Dionne Warwick albums, Sir Andrè Previn works, Nickelodon Television, Sarah Brightman, The Kennedy Ceneter, Walt Disney Music Studios, Radio City Music Hall, Lea Salonga, Stephen Schwartz's Opera and Andrea Bocelli.   He studied at The University of Texas, North Texas, The Juilliard School, The University of Southern California and privately with the orchestrators of Stephen Sondheim and Alan Menken.  He has composed two symphonies, a violin concerto, a harp concerto, a mass, works for vocalists, and received several commissions from orchestras around the world.

About Piece:

While a composer in residence in Wyoming, I wanted to capture the landscape of the open prairies and quiet nights that seemed to most inspired by remembering on my favorite American tall-tales I learned about as a kid growing-up in Texas.  After abandoning the idea of using narrator, I decided to approach the idealized, highly energetic, and larger-than-life hero, Pecos Bill, by trying to depict some of the stories of his tall-tales through the suggestive use of orchestrating and harmonizing a singular short theme which could be continually altered throughout the set of 5 attaca movements, which feature the main characters and elements of the dramas:  1) Pecos Bill Shows Off, 2) The Appearance of Slue-Foot Sue, 3) Lightning, The Horse, 4) The West, and 5) Finale (which is a Coda that is reminiscent of the beginning, that serves to bookend the piece).  In my mind, I was going for very clear images of what was happening as based on some of the tales: Pecos Bill riding a tornado like a bronco, using a rattlesnake as a lasso, Slue-Foot Sue who rode a giant catfish down a river and was the only woman who Pecos Bill ever loved, Lightning, the horse, who ate dynamite, could not be tamed by anyone and still live.  These evocative images easily translated into writing quickly descending flourishes, dissonant clusters of tension, sparks of flutes and muted brass, and ripping, aggressive Horn lines which can be heard, understood, and felt, much like the oral traditions of which the cowboys and settlers during the westward expansion gave us, are based upon.  

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Nathan Kelly's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/09/2011

JONES, Jesse

...innumerable stars, scattered in clusters

2014

10:00

Jesse JONES

...innumerable stars, scattered in clusters

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+2.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

The music of composer Jesse Jones (b.1978) has been performed at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall (New York), the Muziekgebouw (Amsterdam), Seiji Ozawa Hall (Tanglewood), the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater (Philadelphia), the Aspen Music Festival and School, San Francisco’s Nourse Theater, El Paso Pro Musica, the Oregon Bach Festival, the Paul Hindemith Foundation (Switzerland), MusicX, the American Academy in Rome (Italy), and the St. Matthäuskirche (Berlin), among others. Jones' has been commissioned by the Juilliard String Quartet, the Scharoun Ensemble Berlin (a nonet comprised of musicians from the Berliner Philharmoniker), Alter Ego (Italy), the Argento Chamber Ensemble (New York), the Open End Ensemble, counter)induction, the Pulse Chamber Group, SO Percussion, the New Fromm Players, the Cornell Symphony Orchestra and Wind Ensemble, the Israeli Chamber Project, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, the Cornell Glee Club and Chorus, New York’s Camerata Notturna, and the iO and Momenta String Quartets. Violinist Joseph Lin (Juilliard String Quartet), cellist Jeff Zeigler (Kronos Quartet), Anthony Cheung (Talea Ensemble), Xak Bjerken (Los Angeles Piano Quartet), violinist Philippe Graffin, soprano Sharon Harms (Argento Ensemble), clarinetist Chen Halevi, tenor Zach Finkelstein, saxophonist Cliff Leaman, and guitarist Kenneth Meyer have commissioned and premiered Jones’ concerti, solo works, and chamber music. Jones’s 18-minute work for large wind ensemble, Through the Veil, has been released on the album Augenblick (Albany Records, 2012).

Jones received his MM at the University of Oregon under teachers David Crumb & Robert Kyr, and his BM at Eastern Oregon University under John McKinnon & Leandro Espinosa.  Jones  is currently pursuing his DMA at Cornell University with teachers Steven Stucky, Roberto Sierra & Kevin Ernst.

Jones is the recipient of Aspen’s Susan and Ford Schumann Fellowship, Cornell’s Sage Fellowship, the University of Oregon’s Graduate Teaching Fellowship and Outstanding Scholar in Music Composition Award, and Eastern Oregon University’s Outstanding Music Student Award.  Jones also received honorable mention in the 2007ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards.   

Jones’ compositions have been featured on the nationally broadcast A Prarie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor to an estimated live and listening audience of 6 to 10 million.  Jones’ works have been performed at the Oregon Bach Festival, the Portland Rose Festival, in the Oregon Composers Forum, and by So Percussion, the iO String Quartet, Eastman’s Ossia New Music Ensemble, the Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, the Eastern Oregon University Chamber Choir, the Eastern Oregon Opera Club, Capella Romana, the Pacific Rim Gamelan, the Cornell Contemporary Chamber Players, the Oregon Composers Orchestra, the New Frontiers Chamber Orchestra, and the Grande Ronde Symphony Orchestra.  Jones’s choral music is published internationally by earthsongs. 

Jones remains active as a performer on both the piano and the mandolin, and has premiered several of his own works, and works of other composers, on both instruments.  Jones’s musical approach to composition stems from the classical tradition, but also from various folk idioms.  Jones is currently composing a large piano piece, which was commissioned by pianist Mihyun Kim, and a mandolin concerto, which he plans to premier in the spring of 2010.  Other current commissions include works for mixed choir, and a piano quartet for the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble.   

About Piece:

In 1609, Galileo Galilei climbed the tallest hill in Rome and looked into the night sky through an instrument of his own invention: the telescope. His initial glimpse into the cosmos led him to record that the heavens were draped with “innumerable stars, scattered in clusters.” This was the first discovery of that vast, sidereal array we now know as the Milky Way.

Four hundred years later, I found myself on that same hilltop, writing music as a fellow at the American Academy in Rome. While there, I would often wake up before the sunrise and walk to my studio beneath the very same sky Galileo had observed so many centuries earlier. At these moments, when the city was still and the stars shone brightly, I would feel a deep connection to history, a special, timeless kinship with Galileo, and, above all, an urge to be productive with my allotted time. So, I decided to write an orchestra piece about the mysterious and expansive nature of both time and space, and found it fitting to use Galileo’s words as a title.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jesse Jones's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot New York Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Alan Gilbert

Date of reading: 06/03/2014

JONES, Jesse

Toccata for Orchestra

2009

10:00

Jesse JONES

Toccata for Orchestra

Year Composed: 2008

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

2233.4331.timp+4.pno.str

About Composer:

The music of composer Jesse Jones (b.1978) has been performed at Lincoln Center’s Alice Tully Hall (New York), the Muziekgebouw (Amsterdam), Seiji Ozawa Hall (Tanglewood), the Kimmel Center's Perelman Theater (Philadelphia), the Aspen Music Festival and School, San Francisco’s Nourse Theater, El Paso Pro Musica, the Oregon Bach Festival, the Paul Hindemith Foundation (Switzerland), MusicX, the American Academy in Rome (Italy), and the St. Matthäuskirche (Berlin), among others. Jones' has been commissioned by the Juilliard String Quartet, the Scharoun Ensemble Berlin (a nonet comprised of musicians from the Berliner Philharmoniker), Alter Ego (Italy), the Argento Chamber Ensemble (New York), the Open End Ensemble, counter)induction, the Pulse Chamber Group, SO Percussion, the New Fromm Players, the Cornell Symphony Orchestra and Wind Ensemble, the Israeli Chamber Project, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, the Cornell Glee Club and Chorus, New York’s Camerata Notturna, and the iO and Momenta String Quartets. Violinist Joseph Lin (Juilliard String Quartet), cellist Jeff Zeigler (Kronos Quartet), Anthony Cheung (Talea Ensemble), Xak Bjerken (Los Angeles Piano Quartet), violinist Philippe Graffin, soprano Sharon Harms (Argento Ensemble), clarinetist Chen Halevi, tenor Zach Finkelstein, saxophonist Cliff Leaman, and guitarist Kenneth Meyer have commissioned and premiered Jones’ concerti, solo works, and chamber music. Jones’s 18-minute work for large wind ensemble, Through the Veil, has been released on the album Augenblick (Albany Records, 2012).

Jones received his MM at the University of Oregon under teachers David Crumb & Robert Kyr, and his BM at Eastern Oregon University under John McKinnon & Leandro Espinosa.  Jones  is currently pursuing his DMA at Cornell University with teachers Steven Stucky, Roberto Sierra & Kevin Ernst.

Jones is the recipient of Aspen’s Susan and Ford Schumann Fellowship, Cornell’s Sage Fellowship, the University of Oregon’s Graduate Teaching Fellowship and Outstanding Scholar in Music Composition Award, and Eastern Oregon University’s Outstanding Music Student Award.  Jones also received honorable mention in the 2007ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards.   

Jones’ compositions have been featured on the nationally broadcast A Prarie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor to an estimated live and listening audience of 6 to 10 million.  Jones’ works have been performed at the Oregon Bach Festival, the Portland Rose Festival, in the Oregon Composers Forum, and by So Percussion, the iO String Quartet, Eastman’s Ossia New Music Ensemble, the Eugene Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, the Eastern Oregon University Chamber Choir, the Eastern Oregon Opera Club, Capella Romana, the Pacific Rim Gamelan, the Cornell Contemporary Chamber Players, the Oregon Composers Orchestra, the New Frontiers Chamber Orchestra, and the Grande Ronde Symphony Orchestra.  Jones’s choral music is published internationally by earthsongs. 

Jones remains active as a performer on both the piano and the mandolin, and has premiered several of his own works, and works of other composers, on both instruments.  Jones’s musical approach to composition stems from the classical tradition, but also from various folk idioms.  Jones is currently composing a large piano piece, which was commissioned by pianist Mihyun Kim, and a mandolin concerto, which he plans to premier in the spring of 2010.  Other current commissions include works for mixed choir, and a piano quartet for the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble.   

About Piece:

The composer describes Toccata for Orchestra as “equally haughty and aggressive, with equal amounts of pomposity and humor. In the middle of the piece, a slow lyrical section gives a brief respite from the storm, but this reverie soon disintegrates into an instrumental battle to claim the foreground. The piece resumes its rollicking, with aggressive jabs and playful turns, and increases in intensity and momentum, eventually culminating in ecstatic flourishes that form its end.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jesse Jones's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 05/07/2009

JENKINS, Adam

The Floating Bridge of Dreams

2011

6:10

Adam JENKINS

The Floating Bridge of Dreams

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 6:10

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.pno.str.

About Composer:

The recipient of the 2010 Michael Ludwig Nemmers Prize from Northwestern University, John Luther Adams is recognized “for melding the physical and musical worlds into a unique artistic vision that transcends stylistic boundaries”. Adams composes for orchestra, small ensembles, percussion and electronic media and his music is recorded on New World, Cold Blue, Cantaloupe, Mode and New Albion. 

Adams is the author of the book Winter Music (Wesleyan 2004). His sound and light environment The Place Where You Go to Listen is a long-term exhibition at the Museum of the North at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the subject of his second book (Wesleyan 2009). The Farthest Place a book of essays about Adams’ music will appear in early 2011 (University Press of New England). 

In 2011 Adams will be Fromm Visiting Professor of Composition at Harvard. Previously he has taught at the University of Alaska, Bennington College and the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. He has been composer in residence with the Anchorage Symphony, Anchorage Opera, Fairbanks Symphony, Arctic Chamber Orchestra, and the Alaska Public Radio Network, and has served as president of the American Music Center. 

Adams has been honored with the 2010 Distinguished Artist Award from the Rasmuson Foundation. Previously he has received fellowships from United States Artists, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Foundation for Contemporary Arts. 

He has worked with many prominent performers and venues, including the Chicago Symphony, the California EAR Unit, Bang On A Can, Percussion Group Cincinnati, Other Minds, the Sundance Institute, Almeida Opera, and the Radio Netherlands Philharmonic.

Born in 1953, Adams grew up in the South and in the suburbs of New York City. He studied composition with James Tenney and Leonard Stein at the California Institute of the Arts, where he was in the first graduating class (BFA 1973). In the mid 1970s he became active in the campaign for the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act, and subsequently served as executive director of the Northern Alaska Environmental Center. 

About Piece:

The Floating Bridge of Dreams was written by composer Adam Jenkins in 2010-2011 as part of the Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute, a unique collaboration between a select
group of jazz composers, the Center for Jazz Studies at Columbia University and the American Composers Orchestra. Prior to writing this piece, Mr. Jenkins’ primary compositional output had been for big bands, small jazz ensembles and arrangements for pop musicians and flute choirs. This first foray into the world of orchestral music presented a number of questions. First and foremost was how to approach melody and
rhythm, two staples of all musical styles but often approached very differently between different genres and cultures. Rather than try to write a piece in the jazz style (a term
whose meaning is vague at best) he decided to just begin with the theme (heard in the opening) and let any influences come out naturally. The result is The Floating Bridge of
Dreams. The title is derived from a poem by the 12th century Japanese poet Fujiwara no Teika: “Spring Evening-Clouds over the Mountains Seem to be Floating Bridges in my Dreams.” Using the mood and images presented in the poem as a guide, the piece was
structured in four basic sections ranging from ephemeral to more tangible back to ephemeral. Although not overtly jazz influenced, the composers jazz background emerged in more subtle ways -namely in the flowing triplet based rhythms and harmonic language the piece is bathed in.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Adam Jenkins's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

JEN, Chen-Hui

yet the dew remains in pale

2012

19:20

Chen-Hui JEN

yet the dew remains in pale

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 19:20

Instrumentation:

2*2*2*2*.2221.3perc.str

About Composer:

Chen-Hui Jen (born 1981, Kaohsiung, Taiwan) began studying piano when four years old and began composing in high school (1996) graduating from the National Sun Yet-San University (2003), studying with Professor Tzyy-Sheng Lee.  Under the instruction of Professor Hwang-Long Pan, she later earned a Masters’ degree (2005) from the Graduate School of Music at the Taipei National University of the Arts.  Jen is an active member of the Asian Composers' League National Committee (ACL) Taiwan and the International Society of Contemporary Music (ISCM) Taiwan section since 2004.  In 2006, Jen obtained a scholarship from Taiwanese Ministry of Education to study in the United States of America.  Since then she has studied with Professor Chinary Ung at the University of California, San Diego, where she is a PhD candidate in Music Composition. Chen-Hui Jen’s music features an imaginative and spiritual poeticism.  Jen’s works have won prizes in the Kuan-Du Arts Festival Competition, the Literature and Fine Arts Composition Competition, the Formosa Composition Competition, and the Tsang-Houei Hsu International Music Composition Competition.  Her works have been performed in the 2006 ISCM World New Music Festival (Germany), the 2009 Acanthes Music Festival (France), the 2011 ACL Music Festival (Taipei) to name a few.  In recent years, she has also received commissions from the Ching-Yun Chorus, the Taipei Chamber Singers, and the Little Giant Chinese Chamber Orchestra.

About Piece:

yet the dew remains in pale (2011-12) is inspired by a sentence in Shi Jing (The Book of Songs), literally, "white dew not yet dry".  The dew remains after darkness and iciness, and also reflects our inner tears in a universal sense.  As the musical context, the work has five structural images in seven continuous sections.  These structural images are: I. intoning and praying, II. as in a dream, III. the memory, IV. rising winds, tears as mountain rain, and V. loss, as time falls into dimness.  Even though the work's sound world is filled with colors, everything will ultimately fall into paleness, as in thick fogs but overwhelmingly...

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Chen-Hui Jen's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot San Diego Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: James Feddeck

Date of reading: 04/20/2012

JAQUITH, Austin

Blaze of Autumn

2011

11:50

Austin JAQUITH

Blaze of Autumn

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 11:50

Instrumentation:

3*3*3*3*.4331.timp+2.hrp.str

About Composer:

Austin Jaquith, a native Californian, began studying composition in High School with Jack Perla in Oakland, CA.  In 1999 he enrolled at the Cleveland Institute of Music, studying with Margaret Brouwer.  In 2003 he graduated with a Bachelor of Music in composition.  In Cleveland his works were performed by the Biava Quartet, the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, and the Parma Symphony.  From 2003 to 2005 he attended the Moores School of Music at the University of Houston, where he studied with Robert Smith and graduated with a Master of Music in composition.  While at the Moores School he received the Seraphim composition prize, for his String Quartet No. 2, and participated in SCI’s region VI conference in San Antonio.  In the fall of 2005, he began doctoral studies at Indiana University where he studied with David Dzubay, Chinary Ung, Richard Wernick, Claude Baker, and P.Q. Phan.  His String Quartet No. 3 won several honors including the IU Jacobs School of Music Kuttner String Quartet Competition in 2006, the AFMC Emil and Ruth Bayer Composition Competition in the chamber music category in 2007, and was also selected to be performed as part of the 2007 Midwest Composers Symposium.  In 2009, his orchestral work Blaze of Autumn received The Deans Prize in Orchestral Composition at Indiana University.  Up on graduation, Dr. Jaquith was hired as an Assistant Professor of Theory and Composition at Cedarville University in Ohio, where he continues to teach and compose.  Recent performances include Shades of Red, performed at the ITG 2010 Conference in Sydney, Australia, Kinesis by the El Paso Youth Symphony Youth Orchestra, Andy Moran Conductor, and Quintet for Brass by the Mirari Brass Quintet on their southwest tour.

About Piece:

Blaze of Autumn (Five Images from Fall) was inspired by fall in the Midwest.  After spending my formative years as a native Californian, I was very impressed with the beautiful fall colors found in Ohio, where I moved for college.  This work seeks to capture the magnificence found in autumn as green explodes into radiant reds, oranges, and yellows.  There are five brief movements, each an image of a fall scene.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/09/2011

JACOBSEN, Sonia

Carried by the Winds

2016

10:25

Sonia JACOBSEN

Carried by the Winds

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 10:25

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Sonia's childhood was split between Australia and Denmark. Her music studies took place in France and New York. Sonia strives for a synthesis between the classical and jazz worlds by bridging them with her experience in world music and contemporary rhythms. Sonia has studied musicology and jazz saxophone at Grenoble University, Chambéry Conservatory and The New School University in NY. TEaching posts include The New School Jazz and currently at the School of Music at the University of South Carolina. Sonia’s compositions have received numerous awards and prizes from IAJE (International Association of Jazz Educators), ASCAP, American Music Center, American Composers Forum, American Scandinavian Society, Danish Foreign Ministry/Cultural Affairs, and L'Orchestre National de Jazz, France. Her music has been performed by Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra (Germany), Philharmonia Virtuosi (NY), L'Orchestre National de Jazz (France), New Juilliard Ensemble (NY), and Richmond Concert Jazz Orchestra (LA). She is founder and director of the New York Symphonic Jazz Orchestra, and she was co-founder and co-director of Mosaic Orchestra, which had a biweekly jazz club gig in NY in the late 90's.

About Piece:

My piece Carried By The Winds draws inspiration from many different ethic/folkloric and stylistic sources, including several Latin styles, funk music, jazz, Eastern European folklore, and more. To avoid that it sounds like a 'round-the-world-in-9-minutes' collage, I am using extensive motivic development techniques to tie it all together. The basic 6-note motif is heard throughout in its many variations.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute Readings Naples

Conductor: Yaniv Segal

Date of reading: 05/26/2016

JACKSON, Yvette Janine

Atlantic Crossing

2016

7:30

Yvette Janine JACKSON

Atlantic Crossing

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 7:30

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Yvette Janine Jackson is a composer, sound designer, and installation artist. Her focus on radio opera and narrative soundscape composition merges instrumental, text-sound, and electroacoustic techniques into through-composed and improvisatory forms that draw from history and contemporary social themes. Her recent guest composer residency at Stockholm’s Elektronmusikstudion (EMS) culminated with the premiere performance of This is Radio Opera. Yvette is a recipient of San Francisco's Dean Goodman Choice Award for Sound Design and Theatre Bay Area’s Eric Landisman Fellowship. She studied music at the RD Colburn School of Performing Arts in Los Angeles, holds a B.A. in Music from Columbia University and and is currently pursuing a Ph.D. in Music-Integrative Studies at the University of California, San Diego where she studies with Anthony Davis.

About Piece:

Atlantic Crossing is the first movement of a programmatic suite themed around the Middle Passage. A recurring theme in the composer’s works is the Middle Passage of Africans to the Americas. Atlantic Crossing evokes a narrative journey through the exploration of orchestral timbres and forms.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute Readings Naples

Conductor: Yaniv Segal

Date of reading: 05/26/2016

HURST, Jay

Still Lives

2015

10:00

Jay HURST

Still Lives

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

3*333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Jay Hurst (b. 1989) is a composer from Cape Canaveral, FL and currently lives in Bloomington, IN. His music has been performed at the International U.S. Navy Band Saxophone Symposium, Midwest Composers Symposium, Accent11, ACES/ECA NewMusicNewSounds, and the Brevard Music Festival. 

Jay is pursuing a DM at Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music, where he also serves as an Associate Instructor in Composition. He also holds degrees from Indiana University (MM '13) and Stetson University (BM '11) in DeLand, FL. 

Jay has studied with Sven-David Sandström, Claude Baker, P.Q. Phan, David Dzubay, Aaron Travers, Don Freund, and Sydney Hodkinson. Jay is a member of ASCAP and is the co-founder of These Hands Publishing.

About Piece:

Screens are everywhere now. Looking around a crowded room, chances are that you will see many people standing or sitting next to each other with their faces buried in their phones – the great contradiction being that technology interconnects us more than ever before, but our lives become isolated and still by tapping in to that connection. 

In Still Lives, that contradiction is played out in two contrasting movements. The first movement, reunion, is anxious and blurry, featuring an obsessive rising gesture introduced by the violins. The second movement, wire tap, crackles with energy as pitches are gradually added to the open-fifth gesture of the strings, a buzzing mass of overtones and noise. 

Still Lives was completed in July of 2014 in Brevard, North Carolina, and is dedicated to Lee and Hannah Curtis and their son, Shepard, who was born during the first revisions of this piece.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jay Hurst's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Stefan Sanders

Date of reading: 02/11/2015

HSU, Chiayu

Shan Ko

2010

9:00

Chiayu HSU

Shan Ko

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Chiayu was born in Banciao, Taiwan. She was the winner of music+culture 2009 International Competition for Composers, the Sorel Organization’s 2nd International Composition Competition, the 7th USA International Harp Composition Competition, ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer’s Awards, the Maxfield Parrish Composition Contest, the Renée B. Fisher Foundation Composer Awards among others. Her work has been performed by Detroit Symphony, San Francisco Symphony, Toledo Symphony, American Composers Orchestra, Cabrillo Festival Orchestra, Aspen Music Festival Contemporary Ensemble, Eighth Blackbird, and Prism Quartet. Prior to entering Duke University, she studied at Yale University School of Music, and the Curtis Institute of Music. Her teachers have included Jennifer Higdon, David Loeb, Roberto Sierra, Ezra Laderman, Martin Bresnick, Anthony Kelley, Scott Lindroth, and Stephen Jaffe.

About Piece:

Shan Ko, employs material derived from Hakka music. There are various types of Hakka mountain songs, with an abundance of lyrical content. The song-type associated with my piece is called Lao-shan-ko (old mountain songs), which are among the oldest and simplest of Hakka folk song-types. Lao-shan-ko is the name of one such tune, which I have referenced. I am particularly drawn by its use of the minor triad and the libre feeling of the original tune. As a result, many minor triads juxtaposing with the predominantly pentatonic harmony are deployed to explore various timbres between different instrumental groups in the piece. Many times, the melodic fragments are stretched and heavily decorated. Sometimes the echoes of those fragments are produced between instruments. It is the spirit of freedom and spacious acoustics in the mountains that I have tried capture. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Chiayu Hsu's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Nashville Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Giancarlo Guerrero

Date of reading: 04/07/2010

HONSTEIN, Robert

Rise

2014

7:10

Robert HONSTEIN

Rise

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 7:10

Instrumentation:

2*222.2210.timp.str

About Composer:

Robert Honstein (b. 1980) has had his music performed throughout North America by ensembles such as the Cabrillo Festival Orchestra, the New York Youth Symphony, the Albany Symphony Orchestra, the Woodstock Chamber Orchestra, Ensemble ACJW, Ensemble Dal Niente, the Mivos quartet, the Del Sol Quartet, Concert Black, TIGUE, and the Pittsburgh New Music Ensemble, among others. He has received an Aaron Copland Award, multiple ASCAP awards and other honors from SCI, Carnegie Hall, and New Music USA. He has also received residencies at Copland House, the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center, I-Park, the Bang on a Can Summer Institute, and the Tanglewood Music Center. 

Robert co-produces Fast Forward Austin, an annual marathon new music concert in Austin, TX and is a founding member of the New York based composer collective Sleeping Giant. Upcoming projects include commissions from cellist Ashley Bathgate, a consortium of pianists for a solo piano work, and a new work for Eighth Blackbird as part of a collaborative project with Sleeping Giant. He is also composer-in-residence, along with his Sleeping Giant colleagues, with the Albany Symphony Orchestra, as part of a Music Alive grant from New Music USA and the League of American Orchestras. He studied composition at the Yale School of Music with Martin Bresnick, Chris Theofanidis, and David Lang. 

About Piece:

Rise is a brief orchestral essay on moving upward. The music is one extended ramp, an awakening followed by a brief fall, landing somewhere different then where it began. It is also a  meditation on the idea of the pastoral. From Vivaldi to Strauss, there is a long tradition of evoking the pastoral landscape in symphonic music. What does it mean to romanticize nature in the post-industrial, climate-changing 21st century? Perhaps this explains the somewhat haunting mood of the piece. There is a celebration of the natural world, but also an unsettled feeling that never resolves.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

HOLLAND, Jonathan

Shards of Serenity

2014

4:00

Jonathan HOLLAND

Shards of Serenity

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 4:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.4230.2perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Jonathan Bailey Holland’s music has been commissioned and performed by the Alabama, Atlanta, Baltimore, Cleveland, Dallas, Detroit, Indianapolis, Memphis, Minnesota, National, Philadelphia, San Antonio, St. Louis, and South Bend Symphony Orchestras; Auros Group for New Music, Concerto Soloists of Philadelphia, Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphonies, Greater Baltimore Youth Orchestra, Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia, Orchestra 2001, Triple Helix and the New Gallery Concert Series, among many others.  He has received grants, awards and honors from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, American Music Center, Somerville (MA) Arts Council, Massachusetts Cultural Council, ASCAP, the Presser Foundation, Harvard University, and more.  He has served as Composer-in-Residence for the Plymouth Music Series of Minnesota, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Ritz Chamber Players, South Bend Symphony Orchestra, and the Radius Ensemble. Recent and upcoming highlights include the premieres of: Shards of Serenity, commissioned by the Chicago Sinfonietta; The Intimacy of Harmony by pianist Sarah Bob; and  The Clarity of Cold Air, commissioned by the Radius Ensemble; as well as recordings by trumpeter Jack Sutte, and by the University of Texas Trombone Ensemble.   Performances of The Party Starter and Motor City (Re)Mix are scheduled by the Chicago Sinfonietta, featuring DJ Rehka; and by the Erie Chamber Orchestra.  Holland studied with Ned Rorem at Curtis Institute of Music, and Bernard Rands at Harvard University. He is currently Associate Professor of Composition at the Berklee College of Music in Boston, and a faculty member in the Music Composition program at Vermont College of Fine Arts.

About Piece:

Commissioned by the Chicago Sinfonietta in partnership with the Chicago Architectural Foundation, Shards of Serenity is one of four movements that make up the work ChiScapes, a collaborative composition celebrating the architectural landmarks of the city of Chicago.  In addition to my composition, ChiScapes includes movements composed by Armando Bayolo, Christopher Rogerson and Vivian Fung – each movement corresponding to a different building.  The Chicago Sinfonietta premiered the work on June 8th, 2013, with Mei-Ann Chen conducting. 

Creating compositions inspired by other art forms is something I have done many times, but in this instance the art that serves as inspiration is art that I have only experienced via pictures and words – Mies van der Rohe’s Crown Hall, on the campus of IIT.   Many who have actually been inside of the structure comment on the serenity experienced both inside and out.  I can imagine feeling serene in such a large, open structure in which natural light streams through the ceiling to floor windows that envelope the entire building.  Undoubtedly light streams in through all of the windows at various times of day in many different ways.  With no internal walls to direct the journey through the building, a visitor would likely be forced to confront their physical location and presence at whatever location they found themselves within the building.  Perhaps initially one’s attention would be drawn upwards since the glass at eye level is translucent, while the glass above eye level is transparent.  And, again at least initially, I would imagine there is a moment of disorientation – an uncertainty about where to focus.  Eventually a visitor would find their bearings, creating their own personal experience in the space.  Shards of Serenity is a sonic representation of this type of experience, with the sounds being inspired by the physicality of the open space  Timbres and harmonies emerge from the orchestra from various locations, changing once they appear, creating the aesthetic of a serene space.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Detroit Symphony Orchestra Classical Roots Readings

Conductor: Leonard Slatkin

Date of reading: 03/09/2014

HOLCOMB, Robin

All the While

2016

9:00

Robin HOLCOMB

All the While

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Drawing inspiration from her childhood in Georgia, her work among avant-garde musicians in New York, and her stints in both California and New York, Robin Holcomb developed into a critically acclaimed singer/songwriter showcased by the Nonesuch label. After attending the University of Santa Cruz, she moved to New York with her husband, Wayne Horvitz, and co-founded Studio Henry, a performance outlet where she gave poetry readings and concerts. She also wrote big band pieces for the New York Composers Orchestra, which she co-founded with Horvitz. They relocated to Seattle in 1988 and she began transitioning into a singer/songwriter role with the premiere of her musical theater work Angels at the Four Corners, which featured storytelling with songs, some of which Holcomb sang. Some of that material appeared on her self-titled debut album in 1990. Her 1992 follow-up, Rockabye, continued in much of the same vein as the debut, with literate story-songs set against a backdrop of folk-inspired music. 1996's Little Three went in a different direction as a mostly instrumental piano album. She returned with her first collection of songs in a decade with 2002's Big Time, which featured a number of big-name guest artists, including Bill Frisell, Kate and Anna McGarrigle, and violist Eyvind Kang. Solos, a split album with Wayne Horvitz, appeared from Songlines in 2004. John Brown's Body was issued by Tzadik in 2006.

About Piece:

All the While resembles a dream in which the vignettes and recollections from waking life collide in a dream state. All the While is through-composed and is intended to stand on its own, although it may later become a movement of a larger work.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Robin Holcomb's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute Readings Naples

Conductor: Yaniv Segal

Date of reading: 05/26/2016

HERTZBERG, David

Spectre of the Spheres

2015

10:30

David HERTZBERG

Spectre of the Spheres

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 10:30

Instrumentation:

3222.4231.timp+3.hrp.cel.str

About Composer:

Hailed as “opulently gifted” and “utterly original”, the music of David Hertzberg (b.1990) is swiftly garnering recognition, with recent seasons seeing performances at the festivals of Aspen, Tanglewood, and Santa Fe, and on the stages of Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, and Carnegie Hall (Opera News, The New York Times).  Highlights of his 2014-2015 season include premieres of new works for Young Concert Artists and the PRISM Quartet, with performances at Merkin Hall and Symphony Space, as well as performances at the Kennedy Center, a feature on APM’s Performance Today, a performance at Hong Kong’s The Intimacy of Creativity festival, and a reading with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Other upcoming projects include a large-scale concert work for Gotham Chamber Opera, to be premiered on their 2015-2016 season in New York. Recent engagements include works for sopranos Julia Bullock and Jennifer Zetlan, pianists Ursula Oppens and Steven Lin, the Juilliard Orchestra, the Curtis Orchestra, the New Juilliard Ensemble, the Flux Quartet, the Dover Quartet, and the New Fromm Players.  Recent distinctions include those from Gotham Chamber Opera, the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Composers Forum, Copland House, Yaddo, Tanglewood, ASCAP, BMI, and Young Concert Artists, where he currently serves as Composer-In-Residence. David began his musical studies at the Colburn School in Los Angeles and received his Bachelor and Master of Music degrees with Scholastic Distinction from the Juilliard School, where he studied with Samuel Adler. At his commencement, he was awarded the John Erskine Prize for outstanding artistic achievement throughout the course of his studies. He is currently pursuing an Artist Diploma at The Curtis Institute of Music, where he holds the Anthony B. Creamer III fellowship.

About Piece:

In the opening stanzas of The Auroras of Autumn (from which my work’s title is drawn), Wallace Stevens uses the image of a serpent thrashing after having shed its skin, glimmering and flashing as if possessed, as a metaphor for the majestic beauty of the Northern Lights. I found this idea, of something primordial, that is at once terrifying and arrestingly beautiful, to be a very poignant one, and one ripe for musical expression. With Spectre of the Spheres I sought to create something that moves and breathes like the mystical and unfettered Aurora, with a reckless vitality, inexorably, and of its own accord.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

HERRINGTON, B.P.

A Region Lovlier Far

2014

4:25

B.P. HERRINGTON

A Region Lovlier Far

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 4:25

Instrumentation:

2222.2220.1perc.pno.str

About Composer:

B. P. Herrington was born in East Texas, in 1976.  His works have been performed by artists such as soprano Tony Arnold, conductor James Baker, Ensemble Linea, El Perro Andaluz, the London Sinfonietta, the Royal Academy Symphony Orchestra, the New York Youth Symphony, the BBC Singers, in venues such as Rothko Chapel, Queen Elizabeth Hall, Carnegie Hall, and London’s Purcell Room.  He is founding director of Intersection New Music Collective based at Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, Texas, where he teaches composition and analysis.  

Composition awards include the Royal Philharmonic Society Composition Prize, Morton Gould Award (ASCAP), Leo Kaplan Prize (ASCAP), First Music Award (New York Youth Symphony) and two composition awards from the Royal Academy of Music.  His music has been selected for performance at June in Buffalo (2013), Wellesley Composers Conference (2013), the Cleveland Composers Recording Institute (2013), Pharos Arts Festival in Cyprus (2012), the Soundscape Festival in Italy (2011), UMKC Cello Days (2010), the OMMAGIO memorial concert for Berio in London (2004), the Royal Festival Hall Organ Recital Series (2002), and the British Society for the Promotion of New Music (2001). 
Herrington earned a Ph.D. in music composition at the Royal Academy of Music, London, where he studied with Simon Bainbridge (2001-2004).  He also studied with Marc Satterwhite and Steve Rouse at the University of Louisville (1998-2000), and with Frank Felice at Lamar University (1994-1998).  He has attended composition masterclasses with Brian Ferneyhough, Mario Davidovsky, Eric Chasalow, Melinda Wagner, Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, Karel Husa and Donald Erb.  Herrington also attended masterclasses with Helmut Lachenmann, Beat Furrer and Georges Aperghis at the Darmstadt International Summer Courses in 2006.  In addition to studying trumpet and piano at the undergraduate and graduate levels, he studied conducting privately, in graduate seminars and in masterclasses (Craig Kirkhoff).

About Piece:

My new orchestral work is a tone poem about my native area in the Big Thicket of East Texas.  The textural and acoustic sound-world is born of the tangled woods and shaded creeks of the Thicket.  My musical lines teem with voices from my family and my past: the strange ecstatic blend of gospel and honky-tonk I heard as a child in our rural Pentecostal church (where my father led the singing and I played trumpet), the high fervent singing of my backwoods Baptist grandmother and other kinfolk, as well as the songs and folklore of the Big Thicket, still resonant with old Scots-Irish roots. 
I seek to recreate the acoustic of the cloistered, pine straw-laden boughs of the thicket, as well as the more open acoustic of the pastures, clearings, and coastal plains.  I have incorporated a number of folk ballads collected in the Thicket (many of which can be found in William A. Owens’ Texas Folk Songs of 1950), as well as fiddle tunes and hymns, all refracted through the lens of my imagination.    
My primary aesthetic models are literary, in particular William Faulkner, who so admirably balanced modernism and unique sense of place.  The piece has no preconceived notion of form, but rather follows an intuitive episodic narrative.  As Flannery O’Connor said, “You don’t dream up a form and put the truth in it.  The truth creates its own form.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony Under Construction

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/04/2014

HELM, Ethan

The Glorious Train Ascending

2016

10:25

Ethan HELM

The Glorious Train Ascending

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 10:25

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

New York-based saxophonist and composer Ethan Helm makes music that flirts with the boundaries of familiarity in jazz and concert music, creating points of sound where diverse traditions become inseparable.  Ethan is involved in a variety of musical communities, leading his own quartet and co-leading the jazz quintet “Cowboys & Frenchmen,” as well as a composing and arranging for jazz ensembles, indie rock groups, and dance.  He has performed at the Umbria Jazz Festival, the Kennedy Center’s Millennium Stage, and throughout the United States and Canada.  He was awarded 2nd place in the North American Saxophone Alliance jazz competition and will return in 2016 as a featured artist.  In June 2015 he released an album of compositions and free improvisations for quartet, “The Spoon.”  Ethan grew up in a musical family in Southern California, and holds degrees Eastman School of Music and New York University.

About Piece:

The Glorious Train Ascending is an attempt to translate the rhythmic vitality of the jazz tradition’s greatest contributors to the realm of the symphony orchestra. These rhythms have always captivated me with their transcendently beautiful mystery, similar to John Milton’s imagery of creation in “Paradise Lost,” from which poem this piece derives its title. The piece moves through a series of episodes that expand upon forms developed by Count Basie, Charlie Parker and Thad Jones from the big band tradition to Tony Williams’ nebulous, exuberant metric modulations in Miles Davis’ quintet in an effort to bring a personal language, rooted in the rhythmic traditions and techniques of jazz, to the symphony orchestra in a way that may look vastly different on the page, but captures their spirit in performance.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ethan Helm's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

HELIAS, Mark F.

Stochasm

2011

7:45

Mark F. HELIAS

Stochasm

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 7:45

Instrumentation:

22*2*2.2221.timp+2.cel.str

About Composer:

American double bassits and composer Mark Helias is a leader in the worl of creative improvised music as well as an innovator of extended techniques for his instrument. A graduate of Yale School of Music, he is trained as both an orchestral musician and jazz improviser. Helias is a prolific composer and written the music for 11 albums he has released since 1984. He has worked with some of the greatest names in jazz, including Anthony Braxton, ed Blackwell, Dewewy redman, Cecil Taylor, Don Cherry, Marilyn Crispell and Julius Hemphill. Helias teaches at Sarah Lawrence College, The New School, and SIM (School for Improvised Music), and is committed to broadening the scope of musical education. 

About Piece:

I endevoared to make the musical themes emerge through a veilof color and atmosphere by sometimes burying them inside the background orchestration. The piece is intended to function like a lens gradually moving from soft focus to a more stark clarity and in the end, a retun to the wistful airiness of the opening glissandi strings.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

HE, Yuanyuan (Kay)

Passeig de Gracia

2015

6:30

Yuanyuan (Kay) HE

Passeig de Gracia

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 6:30

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Yuanyuan (Kay) HE began learning piano at age 5. At age 15, she began studying composition at the affiliated middle school of Shenyang Conservatory of China. As a double major undergraduate, Kay He studied with Tang Jianping in composition at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing (CCOM), and with Zhang Xiaofu at the Conservatory’s Center for Electroacoustic Music of China (CEMC). The winner of the Snow Scholarship, Kay He completed her Master’s degree in composition at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC).  While at UMKC, she studied under Dr. Zhou Long, Dr. Chen Yi, Dr. Paul Rudy and Dr. James Mobberley. Besides music, she also learned to paint at the UMKC Department of Art and Fine Arts. She is currently pursuing her doctoral degree in composition (DMA) at the University of Texas at Austin, studying under Dr. Dan Welcher, Dr. Russell Pinkston, Dr. Donald Grantham, and Dr. Yevgeniy Sharlat. 

About Piece:

Passeig de Grácia for orchestra is dedicated to my parents, who both gave me and taught me to appreciate life. The inspiration for this piece came during my solo trip to Barcelona. While wandering around the famous Passeig de Grácia (Passage de Grácia), I was impressed by the city, the so-called “The Great Enchantress.” The city is like a warm breeze from the Mediterranean Sea intertwined with a passionate and artistic spirit. Barcelona is the city that tells the whole world how it once made a fascinating dream come true. Antoni Gaudí was the dream shaper who filled the real world with gleaming colors, swirling sparks, and painted dreams. He used his magic to ignite the starry sky, embrace us, and fulfill our deepest dreams. These dreams are the remains of his time, floating along with the passion of art. Magic oozes from Barcelona. Mirth saturates in every lonely soul. The orchestra is the medium to express my feeling of this glamorous city, and Gaudi, one of the greatest artists. This is my enchanting, dazzling, and passionate dream come true.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 05/07/2015

HARRISON, Joel

The Other River

2013

3:35

Joel HARRISON

The Other River

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 3:35

Instrumentation:

2*22*2.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Guitarist, composer, arranger, vocalist, songwriter – Joel Harrison deftly juggles all of these roles while venturing across stylistic divides. He is at home in jazz clubs and concert halls - and the occasional dive bar across town. Harrison sees no reason to sort his music into jazz, classical, or any such divisions. “Ultimately you’re just trying to arrive at great music,” he says. “Sometimes the best methodology is to leave people to their own devices and sometimes it’s best to write everything down. Usually I fall somewhere in between."
 
Harrison was named a Guggenheim Fellow in 2010, is a two-time winner of the Jazz Composer’s Alliance Composition Competition, and has received support from Chamber Music America, Meet the Composer, New Music USA, the Flagler Cary Trust, NYSCA, and the Jerome Foundation.  He has released 14 cds since 1995 as a leader.

About Piece:

Sometimes when I lay down to go to sleep, safe in my home, next to the person I love, I hear an alarmingly present voice calling from inside me saying, ""i want to go home.

Dear listener, what does this mean? It does not mean I am unhappy, or alone or lost. Rather, it may mean that worlds within worlds exist inside us, and there are many homes therein. Music is a life raft that I travel upon through these worlds. The Other River, as best I can tell it never stops moving. This is Part one. To be continued.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Joel Harrison's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic JCOI

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 04/24/2013

HADDAD, Saad

Kaman Fantasy

2015

12:00

Saad HADDAD

Kaman Fantasy

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.4221.timp+2.hrp.cel.str

About Composer:

Saad Haddad's works have been performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the American Composers Orchestra, the Juilliard Orchestra and the USC Thornton Symphony. Recent accolades include the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award (2015), the Gena Raps Chamber Music Prize (2015), the BMI Student Composer Award (2014), and the Copland House Residency Award (2014). Haddad focuses on creating compositions that incorporate Arabic musical tradition in a Western context, both in acoustic and electroacoustic mediums. As a first-generation Arab-American living in the twenty-first century, he is influenced by the disparate qualities inherent between Arab and American cultures. Haddad's music delves into that relationship through the melding of traditional instruments and current advances in technology. This season, the American Composers Orchestra, the New Juilliard Ensemble and the Columbus Symphony will premiere his latest three works at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and the Ohio Theatre, respectively. Other performances include Virginia premiere of Shifting Sands, for piano and electronics, at the Electroacoustic Barn Dance and the Ariose Singers' performances of his choral works, The Little Boy and Ah Sunflower, as part of the New Music Works' series in Santa Cruz, California. Haddad is currently working on a collaboration with Juilliard-trained, Toledo-based choreographer Sean Howe and a new composition for piano trio funded by the Five Partners Foundation. Haddad holds a Bachelor of Music—Composition from the University of Southern California, where his teachers included composers Donald Crockett, Stephen Hartke, Frank Ticheli, Brian Shepard, and Bruce Broughton. He is currently in his last year at the Juilliard School, pursuing a Master of Music—Composition with John Corigliano.

About Piece:

Kaman Fantasy takes its name from ‘kamanjah,’ the Arabic word for ‘violin.’ The piece is an exploration of the Arabic ‘maqamat’ (sets of scales) and rhythms in a Western classical context. The music embraces both traditions, often swaying back and forth between Arabic and Western idioms. As a first-generation Arab-American, I have often found myself shifting between both cultures in the way that I think and act, sometimes voluntarily, most times not. Kaman Fantasy is a reflection on those experiences.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Saad Haddad's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Columbus Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Rossen Milanov

Date of reading: 10/29/2015

HADDAD, Saad

Maelstrom

2013

7:40

Saad HADDAD

Maelstrom

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 7:40

Instrumentation:

333*3*.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Saad Haddad's works have been performed by the Los Angeles Philharmonic, the American Composers Orchestra, the Juilliard Orchestra and the USC Thornton Symphony. Recent accolades include the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award (2015), the Gena Raps Chamber Music Prize (2015), the BMI Student Composer Award (2014), and the Copland House Residency Award (2014). Haddad focuses on creating compositions that incorporate Arabic musical tradition in a Western context, both in acoustic and electroacoustic mediums. As a first-generation Arab-American living in the twenty-first century, he is influenced by the disparate qualities inherent between Arab and American cultures. Haddad's music delves into that relationship through the melding of traditional instruments and current advances in technology. This season, the American Composers Orchestra, the New Juilliard Ensemble and the Columbus Symphony will premiere his latest three works at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall, and the Ohio Theatre, respectively. Other performances include Virginia premiere of Shifting Sands, for piano and electronics, at the Electroacoustic Barn Dance and the Ariose Singers' performances of his choral works, The Little Boy and Ah Sunflower, as part of the New Music Works' series in Santa Cruz, California. Haddad is currently working on a collaboration with Juilliard-trained, Toledo-based choreographer Sean Howe and a new composition for piano trio funded by the Five Partners Foundation. Haddad holds a Bachelor of Music—Composition from the University of Southern California, where his teachers included composers Donald Crockett, Stephen Hartke, Frank Ticheli, Brian Shepard, and Bruce Broughton. He is currently in his last year at the Juilliard School, pursuing a Master of Music—Composition with John Corigliano.

About Piece:

When I began writing Maelstrom, I knew I wanted to keep people right on the edge of their seats, holding on for dear life, as their ship, the concert hall, catches a devastating current that puts them at the heart of an unrelenting storm. The sawing string section in the beginning sucks the unwarned vessel in, reeling it into a whirling black hole of low brass and high woodwind runs. We then change perspective and view the storm from the eyes of those bewildered and terrified sailors, who bicker amongst themselves in confusion and despair, evoked by the punches of the low woodwinds and the quarrel between the horns and trumpets, with of course, the unforgiving storm of the string section always present in the background. Eventually the storm subsides, turning those fast repeating string lines into soft and seemingly innocent pizzicato triplets. But as more and more layers begin to be added, the crew starts to panic once again — the storm is back in full force and it becomes just a matter of minutes before the ship and her men become forever lost in the depths of the Maelstrom. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Saad Haddad's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 04/09/2013

HABER, Yotam

Forward Ornament

2009

12:00

Yotam HABER

Forward Ornament

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

2222.2200.2perc.str

About Composer:

Yotam Haber, 32, was born in Holland and is a citizen of Israel and the United States. After attending Indiana University, studying with Eugene OBrien and Claude Baker, he completed a doctorate in composition at Cornell University in 2004, studying with Roberto Sierra and Steven Stucky. He spent 2000 in Bologna, Italy, as part of the Course on Use of Live Electronics, taught by Alvise Vidolin (Luigi Nonos sound engineer) and the composer Adriano Guarnieri. He received a 2002 ASCAP Foundation Morton Gould Award for his chamber orchestra work, In Sleep a King, and one in 2004 for his double clarinet quintet, Blur. In 2004, he also won the second bi-annual ASCAP/CBDNA Frederick Fennell Prize for the wind ensemble work, Espresso, which was performed at Carnegie Hall by Rutgers Wind Ensemble, directed by William Berz, and consequently recorded for release in the fall of 2005. He has been a Fellow at the Tanglewood Music Center (studying with George Benjamin and Osvaldo Golijov), the Aspen Music Festival (studies with Chris Rouse and Nicholas Maw), and been in residence at the Aaron Copland House, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, and MacDowell Colony. His music has been performed in prestigious halls throughout Germany, Italy, Ireland, Holland, and across the U.S. Haber resides in New York City and is a 2005 Guggenheim Fellow. Most recent performances include the Flux Quartet performing Torus in New York Citys Bargemusic, and the Knights Ensemble premiering A Wine-Dark Sea at the Brooklyn Lyceum, commissioned by Music At The Anthology (MATA), and hailed by the New Yorker magazine critic, Alex Ross as deeply haunting.

About Piece:

Forward Ornament is a fast, sleek, short burst of energy, that explores, fights, dissolves, and re-forms Baroque notions of symmetry, clarity, harmony, ornamentation, and line. Its inspiration comes from the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures of Italo Calvino. With this work, I begin a series of pieces that meditate on the six characteristics that Calvino prized and valued above all others: lightness, quickness, visibility, exactitude, multiplicity, and (the unfinished) consistency. Ornaments - those rapid musical flourishes that are not really necessary but serve to decorate a melody, harmony, or line take center stage in this piece. Like the singing of birds, these musical crystals are ornate, yet clear, clean, and light.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Yotam Haber's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Colorado Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 07/17/2009

GROFFMAN, Joshua

Music from elsewhere: orchestra

2013

15:30

Joshua GROFFMAN

Music from elsewhere: orchestra

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 15:30

Instrumentation:

3*33*3*.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Joshua Groffman (b. 1984) has written works for orchestral, vocal, and chamber ensembles, as well as for electronic media, theater, and film. His works have been performed by groups including Ensemble Laboratorium, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, the Delaware Valley Chorale, the Indiana University Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, and the Cornell University Chamber Singers, and selected for performance at festivals including the Aspen Music Festival, June in Buffalo, SEAMUS National Conference, Florida State University New Music Festival, the CUNY POP! Conference, Midwest Composers Symposium, and the 60x60 VoxNovus New York Minutes Mix. 

Groffman graduated magna cum laude from Cornell University in 2007, where he completed double majors in music and history. While at Cornell, he studied composition with Roberto Sierra and Steven Stucky and piano with Xak Bjerken and Malcolm Bilson. Groffman holds Doctor of Music (2012) and Master of Music (2009) degrees from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where he studied composition with Sven-David Sandström, P.Q. Phan, Claude Baker, Aaron Travers, and Don Freund and computer music with Jeffrey Hass and John Gibson. As a music theorist, he maintains an active schedule of research and conference presentations and served as an Associate and Coordinating Instructor in the theory department at the Jacobs School of Music. He currently teaches composition and theory at the John J. Cali School of Music at Montclair State University. 

He is originally from Millbrook, NY. 

About Piece:

The title “music from elsewhere” comes from a passage in Margaret Atwood's novel The Robber Bride and evokes, for me, a sense of dichotomy between two types of music:  one that is fully present, audible, and familiar to us, and another which is more mysterious, emerging into our perception only in fits and starts - the ""music from elsewhere.""  The idea of this dichotomy appealed to me because it seemed to capture a facet of the experience of daily life, namely, that if prosaic and familiar concerns largely shape our existence, they are occasionally interrupted by a sense that something larger and more fundamental is at work behind the scenes.  Music from elsewhere attempts to capture that sense of an ineffable, larger something.

In the present work,  the ""music from elsewhere"" evolves over the course of the work's fifteen minutes, starting from thick, murky chords in the low winds and strings to high, bright ones in the flutes and violins, finally encompassing the entire ensemble at the climax.  Alternating with these chords, which lack a clear sense of pulse, is another type of music that is sharply rhythmic, often heard as thumping attacks in the basses and percussion.  

These musics continually emerge from and subsume one another throughout the work.  At the dramatic center of the piece, the two finally merge; the "music from elsewhere" takes on a rhythmic element at last in a series of hammering chords for the entire ensemble.  These hammering chords continue to reassert themselves as the piece closes, but in shorter and shorter outbursts.  Never beaten, they simply vanish as the murky texture from the beginning re-emerges.  The work is a circle; the music does not die away or end, but continues, elsewhere, out of our hearing but always present.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 04/09/2013

GREENE, Adam

In Winter

2012

9:00

Adam GREENE

In Winter

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

3*333.3230.3perc.hrp.cel.str

About Composer:

Born in Chicago in 1970, Adam Greene is a composer of instrumental works intended to re-explore the nature of engagement between composer and performer. His compositions have been commissioned and presented by performers and institutions including SONOR, Ensemble Resonanz, the Formalist Quartet, János Négyesy, and Speculum Musicae. While several of his compositions are extended from concepts where no particular text exists, many works have emerged from an encounter with writings, such as those by Calvino, Beckett, Joyce, and Carroll. Adam’s music has been performed in cities around the United States, including New York, Boston, and Los Angeles, as well as in Europe and Asia. He has participated in several festivals and residency programs including UCROSS, the Atlantic Center for the Arts, the International Ferienkurse für Neue Musik (Darmstadt), the Composers Conference at Wellesley, the Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano Performance (at the New England Conservatory of Music), and the Long Beach Summer Arts program. As a student of Franco Donatoni in the mid-1990’s he was enrolled in courses in composition and contemporary music at the Civica Scuola, Milan. His awards include a commission grant from the Fromm Music Foundation at Harvard, as well as prizes from ASCAP, American Composers Forum, and NACUSA. Recordings of his music can be found on Aucourant Records. Adam took degrees in Music and Anthropology at Connecticut College, and earned a Master’s in Composition at the New England Conservatory of Music. After his studies in Italy he moved to California, where, at UCSD, he received the Ph.D and has taught courses in composition and theory at the University of Minnesota, UCSD, and the New England Conservatory of Music.

About Piece:

In Winter, for orchestra, was composed in the winter of 2007. The initial ideas for the work emerged the year before while living in Minnesota. I was compelled to write the piece after encountering the following haiku written by Basho:

Winter solitude –
in a world of one color
the sound of wind.

Basho’s haiku has an astonishing capacity to evoke a rich series of images and ideas through a remarkable economy of words. 

In Winter is a quiet piece, marked by slowly shifting bands of sound. The work is sparse: there are no themes or figurative gestures to speak of; rather harmonies are frozen, and significant emphasis is placed on reconfiguring the orchestral colors that comprise these harmonies in order to offer a dynamic (or prismatic) view of the materials. There are three basic ideas in the work, each one allied with a line from the haiku, and like its textual source, the music is at once concentrated and evocative. The work does not intend to present a particular image or series of images, nor does it illustrate a program; however, in its recursive ruminations of the haiku emerges a physicality animated by spaces, textures, and sensations I associate with winter.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Adam Greene's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot San Diego Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: James Feddeck

Date of reading: 04/20/2012

GRAFE, Max

Bismuth: Variations for Orchestra

2014

11:22

Max GRAFE

Bismuth: Variations for Orchestra

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 11:22

Instrumentation:

3233.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Max Grafe (b. 1988) is rapidly emerging onto the American contemporary classical music scene. Mr. Grafe’s work has recently been performed by Quince Contemporary Vocal Ensemble, newEar Contemporary Chamber Ensemble, and bassoonists Elizabeth Garrett and Sasha Gee Enegren; the remainder of the 2013/2014 season will see further performances by Quince and Sasha Gee Enegren, as well as by pianist Han Chen and saxophone-percussion duo Patchwork.

Mr. Grafe has received several prestigious awards for student composers, including several named scholarships for graduate study at the Juilliard School, a fellowship for study at the 2012 Aspen Music Festival and School, a 2011 Jacobs School of Music Dean’s Prize, a 2007 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award, and a competition-based scholarship for undergraduate composition study at Indiana University.

About Piece:

Bismuth: Variations for Orchestra is the product of a desire to compose a piece with a high degree of abstraction, many of my recent works having been heavily informed by extramusical sources. Loath to entirely abandon my affinity for intertextuality, however, I titled the work Bismuth in order to highlight the kinship between its own colorful, angular style and the kaleidoscopic patina and geometric edges of a pure bismuth crystal. Musically, the work is laid out in a large arch form with an opening theme and seven continuous variations. Each successive variation is in fact a variation upon its predecessor rather than directly upon the theme, and thus it is the distinctive characters of each variation, rather than the musical materials being treated, that are primarily responsible for articulating the work's form. After the first three variations—a bombastic and martial Interlude, a grimly humorous Scherzetto, and a lyrical Arioso respectively—the theme is restated verbatim amidst a tumultuous and dramatic accompaniment in the central fourth variation. Subsequently, the characters of the first three variations are revisited in reverse order for the final three variations, and the work concludes with a brief and choked-off recapitulation of its opening bars. Bismuth was composed between October and November 2013 in Manhattan and Wallkill, New York.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Max Grafe's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot New York Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Alan Gilbert

Date of reading: 06/03/2014

GORBOS, Stephen

Bounce

2012

9:20

Stephen GORBOS

Bounce

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 9:20

Instrumentation:

3*333.4331.timp+4.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Stephen Gorbos composes concert music for a range of ensembles and soloists, as well as music for film, theatre, and dance.  His music, described by the Washington Post as “lyrical…warm and richly drawn,” navigates a wide palette of genres and influences, creating a unique synthesis between styles as diverse as American rhythm & blues, western classical music, and Javanese gamelan. Whether composing for traditional ensembles, electronic media, or a mixture of both, Stephen tries to create an expressive music that connects with an audience.
Stephen’s music has been performed in concert halls across the US and in Europe by organizations such as the Minnesota Orchestra, the New England Philharmonic, and the Cuarteto Latinamericano. Recent commissions have come from the Strathmore Music Center in Bethesda, MD (Highway Music, for violist Wendy Richman and electronics), and the University of Houston Percussion Ensemble (Push, which was released on Albany Records in January 2012).  In 2009, Stephen, along with pianist Augustus Arnone and composer Christopher Bailey, co-founded Collide-O-Scope Music, an ensemble dedicated to mixed media performance (www.collidemus.com). Collide-O-Scope has since presented events at venues such as Brooklyn’s Issue Project room and Washington, DC’s Atlas Theatre.
Stephen has received recognition and support from ASCAP, Meet the Composer, and the American Music Center.  He was awarded a Subito Grant from the Amercian Composers Forum for his work Signals for the NOW Ensemble, and, as a recipient of the Aaron Copland Award, was composer-in-residence at Copland House. Stephen has also been a fellow at both the Tanglewood Music Center and the Aspen Music Festival's composition masterclass, and his music has been featured at Ostrava Music Days, the Oregon Bach Festival Composers Symposium, the Chamber Music Academy and Composers Forum of the East, the Bowdoin Summer Music Festival, and the Joventuts Musicals festival in Torroella de Montgri, Spain.
Active as an educator, Stephen also teaches composition, theory, music technology, and music history, having served as a visiting instructor at the College of the Holy Cross and, since the fall of 2008, as assistant professor of composition and theory at the Catholic University of America in the Benjamin T Rome School of Music.  Stephen holds a BFA from Carnegie Mellon University, an MM from the Yale School of Music, and a DMA from Cornell University.  Originally from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, Stephen currently lives and works in Washington, DC.

About Piece:

Bounce owes its name to the literal “bouncing” of the first notes in the piece: the instruments that open the piece play an energetic tune that jumps between high and low notes.  Much of what happens in the piece from that point forward is built from canonic techniques, where a copy of a melody that was just played is echoed back at a slightly later interval of time.  Aside from a slow middle section, the music is overtly danceable, with an audible beat that should keep toes tapping for most of the piece.   The lively and exuberant nature of the music was inspired by my nephew James, a firecracker of a little boy who, with glittering eyes, bounces around my sister’s house.  

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/23/2012

GIBSON, Sarah

Talking to the Time

2016

13:00

Sarah GIBSON

Talking to the Time

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 13:00

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Sarah Gibson is a Los Angeles-based composer whose works have received recognition including the Victor Herbert ASCAP award, NFMC Marion Richter American Music Composition Award, and first place in the 2010 Percussive Arts Society Composition Contest. Gibson has performed with and had compositions performed by members of eighth blackbird, the What’s Next? Ensemble, the University of Southern California (USC) Symphony, and USC Thornton Edge, among others. Most recently, Sarah co-founded a new music piano duo, HOCKET. HOCKET and has performed with the Boston-based Firebird Ensemble, at the Bang on a Can Music Festival, Carlsbad Music Festival, the San Francisco Center for New Music, and held residency at Avaloch Farms Institute.
Sarah received B.M. degrees in Composition and Piano from Indiana University and a M.M. and D.M.A. in Composition, both at USC. Currently, she is a lecturer at USC and is the Teaching Artist for the esteemed Composer Fellowship Program and Associate Composer Program with the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Artistic Director, Andrew Norman.

About Piece:

If one were to ask my grandmother to talk about her life, she’d choose to narrate it by walking through her home telling the story of how she and my grandfather found each antique, trinket, and piece of furniture that completes their life together. One piece she particularly treasures is her grandfather clock; and an especially meaningful moment in my life was when she asked my husband to wind the clock for her, as I had seen my grandfather do countless times before. Talking to the Time introduces motives and melodies throughout the piece that build upon each other the way one tells a story. Each new melody or section has come from something that has previously occurred as it develops further into the piece. Just as my grandmother walks through her house telling her life story, each piece inspiring a different chapter, so too does this music continuously build on its own narrative.
I died happy in my sleep…
Our children around and you looking down
from heaven’s a julep on the porch…
You and me rocking the grandfather clock is tick tick talking
to the time we used to wind it
–Punch Brothers

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Sarah Gibson's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

GARNER, David

the Machine

2012

12:00

David GARNER

the Machine

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

2222.4210.3perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

David Kirkland Garner is a composer whose music often is inspired by or draws on folk traditions from North America and the British Isles. These interests extend into his research on banjo and fiddle styles of the American South and the traditional fiddling of Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. His music has been performed throughout the US and Europe by groups such as the Ciompi Quartet, the Locrian Chamber Players and the Vega Quartet. His work Lament for the imagined, written for the Kronos Quartet, premiered in 2011 in Glasgow, Scotland. David is the recipient of numerous awards including first prize in the 2011 NACUSA Young Composers‘ Competition, an ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award in 2009, an honorable mention for the same award in 2010, the William Klenz Prize in 2010 and the Sybarite 5 Composition Competition in 2007-2008. Currently, David is a PhD candidate at Duke University. Before coming to Duke, he studied composition at Rice University and the University of Michigan and was a lecturer for one year at Kennesaw State University. David lives in Durham, NC with his wife Bronwen and his dog Niko. To learn more visit: www.davidkirklandgarner.com

About Piece:

The Machine takes its name from the title of a traditional Scottish and Cape Breton fiddle tune and social dance from the 18th century called “The Machine Without Horses.” This title immediately sparked my imagination and curiosity. What was the story behind this fiddle tune? What machine was the composer referring to? After a bit of research I could not find any definitive answers, only guesses. Living in a world with ever advancing technology I was fascinated by the idea of being shocked by a non-horse-driven machine. I wanted to create a machine-like orchestral sound, powered by harp, piano and percussion, based on very simple musical material that spins out into an accumulation of sound and energy. The machine-like musical language in a three-part (plus coda) form is in a kind of snowballing odd meter minimalist style--repetition and variation inspired by my study of folk traditions. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to David Garner's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot San Diego Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: James Feddeck

Date of reading: 04/20/2012

GARCIA, Federico

Consequence

2009

8:00

Federico GARCIA

Consequence

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 8:00

Instrumentation:

1111.1110.2perc.cel.str

About Composer:

Federico Garcia was born in Bogotá, Colombia, in 1978. His musical training began in 1986, and in 2001 he graduated as a composer from the Universidad Javeriana in his
home city, where he was a student of composers Gustavo Parra and Harold Vásquez among others. Upon graduating he moved to Pittsburgh, where in 2006 he completed the degree of Ph.D. in Composition and Theory at the University of Pittsburgh, studying with composers Mathew Rosenblum, Eric Moe, and Roger Zahab.

In 2006, Mr. Garcia co-founded the ensemble ALIA MUSICA Pittsburgh, of which he is Artistic Director. In that capacity, he has produced and conducted over 30 premieres by composers of the Pittsburgh area. Apart from his work in ALIA MUSICA, he currently teaches music courses at Chatham University in Pittsburgh, and directs the Chatham University Instrumental Ensemble.

An award-winning composer, he received first prize in the Colombian National Composition Competition in 2001, for his Passacaglia on a theme by Bach for symphony orchestra, and an Honorary Mention for the same piece in the First International Composition Competition of the Fauxharmonic Orchestra in 2005. His music has been performed in Colombia, Argentina, Germany, and the United States, and includes also An Anatomy of the World on texts by John Donne (2003), Septet (2004), Endecaphony (2006), Livre pour deux pianos (2008), Bajo el Hechizo for marimba, guitar, and piano (2009), and Consequence in two movements for chamber orchestra (2009).

About Piece:

Completed in 2009, Consequence is a work in two contrasting movements: The first is a series of smaller sections, relatively independent—almost a succession of false starts, attempts at climax, and retreats; the second movement is made of two extended parts, with a very gradual increase in tension that sets a clear direction toward a climax at the end of the piece.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

ACO/Penn New Music Readings

Conductor: Cliff Colnot

Date of reading: 04/16/2009

GALLAGHER, Ryan

Grindhouse

2010

13:20

Ryan GALLAGHER

Grindhouse

Year Composed: 2010

Timing (in minutes): 13:20

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Ryan Gallagher is in his third year of graduate studies at Cornell University, where his teachers include Steven Stucky and Roberto Sierra. He received his Bachelor’s of Music degree from The Juilliard School in 2007, where he studied with Christopher Rouse. A native of Wooster, Ohio, he studied composition with his father, Jack Gallagher of The College of Wooster during high school.
Awards include a 2009 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a First Music commission from the New York Youth Symphony in 2008, four ASCAP Foundation Morton Gould Young Composers Awards, winner of the 2007 Arthur Friedman Prize for outstanding orchestral composition at Juilliard, and winner of the 2006 New York Federation of Music Club’s Brian Israel Prize.
Performances of his music include those by the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, The Juilliard Orchestra, eighth blackbird, New York Youth Symphony, New Juilliard Ensemble, and Society for New Music.

About Piece:

Grindhouse refers to the term for a movie theater that specializes in showing exploitation films. While my piece shares its title with the recent motion picture directed by Robert Rodriguez and Quentin Tarantino, it is not related to the plot of that film in any way. I did, however, hope to effect during my work a similar sense of mental and emotional anxiety, as well as over-the-top energy, experienced while watching films found in the exploitation genre. My goal was to compose a piece that exaggerated the different extremes of an orchestra, including the registers of instruments, rhythmic durations, and dynamic ranges. Resultantly, the work presents substantial challenges to the performers in terms of stamina. It is a sort of miniature concerto for orchestra, featuring every instrument and/or section of the ensemble at least once during the course of the piece. 

I have long been fascinated with fast and aggressive music. Grindhouse embodies these characteristics, but attempts to combine its spiteful atmosphere with rapidly changing tempi and odd subdivisions of the beat, instead of a steady pulse. The piece, which is cast in a series of episodes, is connected by relentless harmonic and rhythmic motives. It begins sparsely orchestrated in a low register and develops continually throughout, undergoing frequent changes in formal direction, and ending with an insistent shriek.

I began composing Grindhouse in Aspen, Colorado during the summer of 2009 and completed the score in Ithaca, New York the following winter. It lasts approximately eleven minutes and is dedicated to my dear friend Elizabeth Joan Kelly. The work is scored for an orchestra of piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, bass clarinet, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, a large percussion battery (three players), harp, and strings.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Nashville Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Giancarlo Guerrero

Date of reading: 04/07/2010

FRUCHT, Paul

Dawn

2016

10:35

Paul FRUCHT

Dawn

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 10:35

Instrumentation:

3232.2221.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Originally from Danbury, Connecticut, Paul Frucht is a first year composition student in the Masters program at the Juilliard School where he studies with Robert Beaser. In January 2011, Paul Frucht co-founded PULSE New Music, an organization dedicated to showcasing percussion as a developing force in contemporary chamber music. He now serves as its co-artistic director and composer-in-residence. His works have been performed at Merkin Concert Hall, the Aspen Music Festival, Fredrick Loewe Theatre, The Juilliard School and New York University. He has been commissioned by harpist Gwenllian Lyr, flutist Daniel James, Node Contemporary Music, and PULSE New Music. He also has created several arrangements for the NYU Percussion Ensemble including Philip Glass’s “Prelude to Endgame” and “Serra Pelada” for Large Percussion Ensemble. These arrangements are currently under consideration by Orange Mountain, Glass’s record label, for international CD release. As a percussionist, Paul has performed extensively in the tri-state area and also won the the NYU Concerto Competition playing Eric Ewazen’s “Concerto for Marimba and String Orchestra”.

In May 2011 Paul graduated magna cum laude from New York University’s Steinhardt School with a Bachelor of Music degree in composition and an instrumental concentration in classical percussion. He has studied composition with Justin Dello Joio and Richard Danielpour. Upon his graduation from NYU, Paul received the Founder’s Day Award, an award recognizing outstanding achievement in music, and was recognized as an honor’s scholar. In 2011, he was awarded the Marvin Hamlisch Scholarship in composition by the Juilliard School, both of which he gratefully acknowledges for their support. 

Paul Frucht is from Danbury, CT. music has recently been performed across the United States by the San Diego Symphony, the Milwaukee Symphony, the Juilliard Orchestra, the Weill Cornell Music and Medicine Orchestra, the Chelsea Symphony, American Modern Ensemble, and many others ensembles. A 2015 receipient of a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Paul is currently a D.M.A candidate at Juilliard, where he also earned a Master of Music Degree in 2013, studying with Robert Beaser. Paul earned a Bachelor of Music Degree from NYU, where he studied with Justin Dello Joio. Paul is currently an adjunct faculty member at NYU and is artistic director of the Danbury Chamber Music Intensive, a music festival and concert series he founded this past summer in Danbury, CT that champions the work of Danbury native, Charles Ives, as well as today’s living American composers.

About Piece:

Dawn Hochsprung was an incredible person I had the fortune of meeting when I was a student at Roger’s Park Middle School from 2000- 2003, where she was an assistant principal. I worked with both her and her husband, George, as a member of National Junior Honor Society. When the tragic events occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School on December 14th, 2012, I, like everyone else in the Danbury area, was shocked and deeply saddened. The Hochsprungs had always stuck out in my mind as not just outstanding teachers, but some of the most caring, genuine, and positive people that I had come across during my time growing up in Danbury. I felt immediately compelled to write something for George and also for the other families who lost loved ones.
I titled the piece Dawn not simply because it is dedicated to her, but because the nature of Dawn’s actions on the day of shooting are the inspiration for the character of this piece. When she became aware that her school was in danger, her immediate response was to protect the children of the school. She put herself in harm’s way in an entirely selfless act in an effort to save the lives of her students. Her legacy is one of selflessness, positivity, and extraordinary courage. This piece celebrates that legacy.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Paul Frucht's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

FRUCHT, Paul

Penumbra

2012

15:00

Paul FRUCHT

Penumbra

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 15:00

Instrumentation:

3232.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Originally from Danbury, Connecticut, Paul Frucht is a first year composition student in the Masters program at the Juilliard School where he studies with Robert Beaser. In January 2011, Paul Frucht co-founded PULSE New Music, an organization dedicated to showcasing percussion as a developing force in contemporary chamber music. He now serves as its co-artistic director and composer-in-residence. His works have been performed at Merkin Concert Hall, the Aspen Music Festival, Fredrick Loewe Theatre, The Juilliard School and New York University. He has been commissioned by harpist Gwenllian Lyr, flutist Daniel James, Node Contemporary Music, and PULSE New Music. He also has created several arrangements for the NYU Percussion Ensemble including Philip Glass’s “Prelude to Endgame” and “Serra Pelada” for Large Percussion Ensemble. These arrangements are currently under consideration by Orange Mountain, Glass’s record label, for international CD release. As a percussionist, Paul has performed extensively in the tri-state area and also won the the NYU Concerto Competition playing Eric Ewazen’s “Concerto for Marimba and String Orchestra”.

In May 2011 Paul graduated magna cum laude from New York University’s Steinhardt School with a Bachelor of Music degree in composition and an instrumental concentration in classical percussion. He has studied composition with Justin Dello Joio and Richard Danielpour. Upon his graduation from NYU, Paul received the Founder’s Day Award, an award recognizing outstanding achievement in music, and was recognized as an honor’s scholar. In 2011, he was awarded the Marvin Hamlisch Scholarship in composition by the Juilliard School, both of which he gratefully acknowledges for their support. 

Paul Frucht is from Danbury, CT. music has recently been performed across the United States by the San Diego Symphony, the Milwaukee Symphony, the Juilliard Orchestra, the Weill Cornell Music and Medicine Orchestra, the Chelsea Symphony, American Modern Ensemble, and many others ensembles. A 2015 receipient of a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Paul is currently a D.M.A candidate at Juilliard, where he also earned a Master of Music Degree in 2013, studying with Robert Beaser. Paul earned a Bachelor of Music Degree from NYU, where he studied with Justin Dello Joio. Paul is currently an adjunct faculty member at NYU and is artistic director of the Danbury Chamber Music Intensive, a music festival and concert series he founded this past summer in Danbury, CT that champions the work of Danbury native, Charles Ives, as well as today’s living American composers.

About Piece:

A penumbra is a region of space in which part of the light source is obscured. Essentially, it is a shadow surrounded by light-one dark and hazy outline in the middle of complete clarity. In the summer of 2011, shortly before I began composing Penumbra, I was in a transitional period in my life at which point many aspects of it were drastically changing. I found myself reflecting on memories quite often and became fascinated by the experience one endures when drawing upon a deep, meaningful memory, much like diving into one’s own shadow, removed from clarity. I was intrigued by the way one can simply get lost in it, almost like one is dreaming while still conscious and then suddenly snap back to reality. I find that there is nothing else quite like this feeling of exploration of familiar yet unfamiliar, obscure emotional territory within us. 

In my fascination with this feeling, I also found there is much to be gained. There is a reason we remember and a reason why we find ourselves lost in memories. We are trying to make light of something and as we reflect upon it, it spurs us to think of things in our own life that may be connected. This spurs us to explore parts of ourselves that may not be at the forefront of everyday life. Memory is just as much a wonderful tool of the human brain as it is an emotional reflex. When the mind finally snaps back to reality, it is often with a greater understanding, completing the excursion into one’s own mind. It is this journey of diving into our own shadows, memories, and obscured parts of ourselves in order to return with a greater understanding that I am striving to evoke with this piece.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Paul Frucht's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot San Diego Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: James Feddeck

Date of reading: 04/20/2012

FRIEDLAND, Brian

Dreamscapes

2016

10:55

Brian FRIEDLAND

Dreamscapes

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 10:55

Instrumentation:

2*2*2*2.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Composer/pianist Brian Friedland's music displays creativity through a large and varied body of works. His recordings include compositions for chamber orchestra, big band, strings, brass, saxophone quartet, prepared piano, and many small jazz groups.  While rooted in jazz piano traditions, his compositions also show his love of genres ranging from Balkan Folk to classical minimalism.  In addition to leading several jazz ensembles, his projects include an ongoing series of comedic songs inspired by commercial products and a quartet that blends sonic exploration, funky grooves, and keyboard drums.  Friedland has released three albums, performed at venues across the US and internationally, and frequently performs and collaborates  in his hometown of Boston.  Grammy nominated composer and musical collaborator Kim Richmond describes Friedland's music as "not only professional quality material, but inspirationally crafted, an excellent and interesting mix of art works. He shows his dedication towards creating and performing new music.

About Piece:

The title Dreamscapes is both an allusion to the mysterious process of conjuring up music and the ethereal, hazy atmospheres that I believe are the dominant color of my composition.  

Personally, the most daunting part of composing any large ensemble music is deciding on the initial direction and material of a composition. To help make that choice this time around I thought about the many sonic possibilities, improvisational concepts, and compelling artistic visions presented throughout the Jazz Composers Orchestra Intensive, listened to favorite orchestral and jazz works, and started daydreaming at the piano and many other hours of the day.  I can’t say what I took from where, but as I composed I could hazily feel past thoughts and experiences inform my musical decisions as I searched and struggled for the identity of my piece.  I think the music reflects this thought process -- nearly every section of the composition starts from a distance, with strange and sparse sounds growing into landscapes or narratives, depending on how one likes to imagine music. 

The JCOI experience impacted this piece in several concrete ways.  In response to faculty member James Newton’s adage to use one’s own musical language, I’ve incorporated elements of the blues that are part of my improvisational style.  My writing process was also fueled by Antony Davis’ paraphrasing of Ellington on the blues (to further paraphrase, it’s more of a feeling than a form), and Steve Coleman’s method of composing by transcribing one’s own improvisations. Inspired by Gabriela Lena ¬Frank and Anthony Cheung’s presentations, I revisited Bartok and checked out Henri Dutilleux to further fertilize my imagination.  

The form of the song is a loose take on the classic jazz form of an intro, followed by a melody, solos, and more melody.  Rather than using any exact recapitulation, there is constant color, harmonic, and rhythmic variation of material and diversions and development to the point where that structure is perhaps not even noticeable, as if an adventurous jazz combo was playing freely with all elements.  This approach I think lends itself to the idea of dreaming, where surreal developments and juxtapositions are completely sensical.  In the “solo” section of the piece, players improvise with short melodic fragments, gestures, and percussive rhythms, gradually layering sounds in a sonic collage.  Melodic material from the beginning of the piece returns in this altered landscape.  From there, the music settles on one harmony for a long stretch, building up in many layers in which new and old melodies, harmonies, and rhythms interact, before returning to the gentler, dreamy mood from the start of the piece.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

FRIAR, Sean

Out of Line

2009

9:00

Sean FRIAR

Out of Line

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

1111.1110.1perc.pno.str

About Composer:

Sean Friar was born in 1985 in Los Angeles, and is currently living in New Jersey as he pursues his Ph.D. in composition at Princeton University.  He previously studied at UCLA, where he received degrees in music and psychology. 
A performer from an early age, his first musical love was blues and jazz piano; he began studying classical composition in high school.  His music has since been performed by So Percussion, Ensemble Klang, the New Pacific Trio, the New Millennium Ensemble, members of the Bang on a Can All-Stars, and pianist Thomas Rosenkranz; he has upcoming premieres with the Formalist Quartet, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, and Grammy-winning percussionist Glen Velez.  Also active in computer music, Sean is currently collaborating with the Princeton Laptop Orchestra (PLOrk), So Percussion and Matmos on a work that will be premiered at the Kitchen in New York.
His past honors include the Lee Ettelson Composers Award; two ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Awards; fellowships and scholarships to the Aspen, Bang on a Can, Bowdoin and Norfolk music festivals; 1st place (Regional) in the SCI/ASCAP Competition; 1st place in the Hawaii Institute of Contemporary Music Competition; the Roger Sessions Fellowship and a Perkins Prize at Princeton; the Regents and Lalo Schifrin Scholarships at UCLA; and 1st prize in the National PTA Reflections Contest. 

About Piece:

Out of Line features a single line that, as the composer explains, “is exploded throughout the orchestra.” As the piece progresses, the through-line opens up and gives rise to other lines, chords, and rich textures. Originally written for the smaller Bang on a Can Summer Festival, the piece has been substantially revised to make use of ACO’s Orchestra Underground ensemble.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Sean Friar's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

ACO/Penn New Music Readings

Conductor: Cliff Colnot

Date of reading: 04/16/2009

FRANCIS, Ivor

The Isle of Eriska

2009

12:00

Ivor FRANCIS

The Isle of Eriska

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+1.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Ivor Francis received his bachelor of music degree in composition from California State University, Northridge in 1985, where he studied primarily with Aurelio de la Vega. After fifteen years of professional experience in the music business as a composer, producer and record company entrepreneur, he returned to academic studies at San Francisco State University in the Fall of 2000. In San Francisco, he received professional performances of his chamber works by Earplay and The Left Coast Ensemble; his composition, Flashback on 52nd Street, won the Herb Bielawa Award for Composition in 2001 and earned him the honor of Composer-in-Residence at the university for the following year. In fulfillment of the award, Francis composed an adventurous piece for piano quartet entitled, The Chalice Well, which incorporated preparations and extended techniques for the piano. In the spring of 2002, he was awarded the Otey Music History Award, for his paper entitled Mozart, Masonry, and The Magic Flute; and Second Prize statewide for a research presentation entitled, A Postmodern Approach to the Techniques of Musical Organization and Development. He also received San Francisco State’s highest academic honor, The Distinguished Achievement Award for Academic Excellence 2001-2002. After graduating from SFSU with a master of arts in composition, he attended the Composers Conference at Wellesley College, under the directorship of Mario Davidovsky, as one of ten composition fellows. In 2007, Francis began his doctoral studies at the University of California, Thorton School of Music. In 2008, he received the Sadye J. Moss Composition Award for his orchestral tone poem, The Isle of Eriska; he was also a featured presenter at the International Society for Music Education’s summer conference in Bologna, Italy. Mr. Francis is currently in the second year of the DMA program in music composition at USC where he studies composition with Stephen Hartke.

About Piece:

The Isle of Eriska is a work for large orchestra inspired by a small, magical island off the west coast of Scotland. Francis’ goal was to capture the essence of the island and his experience of it. In the piece, the composer integrates certain Romantic and Impressionistic sensibilities such as lush, tertiary harmonies and the use of melody in a traditional sense mixed with a more atmospheric atonal world of suspended motion and subtle changes in coloration.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ivor Francis's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 05/07/2009

FOUMAI, Michael-Thomas

Concerto for Orchestra

2012

15:25

Michael-Thomas FOUMAI

Concerto for Orchestra

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 15:25

Instrumentation:

3233.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Michael-Thomas Foumai (b. 1987, Honolulu, HI) earned a bachelor in music composition from the University of Hawaii and currently studies at the University Michigan. His music has been performed in the US, China, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and Thailand. His mentors include Robert Beaser, Tristan Murail, Michael Gordon, Xu Shuya, Jia Daqun, Neil McKay and Jon Magnussen. He has studied with Bright Sheng, Michael Daugherty, Peter Askim, Byron Yasui, Donald Reid Womack, Takeo Kudo and Thomas Osborne. Recent performances of his music have been presented at the Osaka College of Music, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Yogyakarta Contemporary Music Festival, Thailand International Composition Festival, MidWest Composers Symposium, Fresno New Music Festival and the Calarts Theatre at Disney Hall. This performance of the Light-Bringer marks the first time Mr. Foumai’s work has been performed by a professional orchestra.

About Piece:

To the Ancient Egyptians the human soul is comprised of five entities, the Ren (name), Ba (soul), Sheut (Shadow), Ib (Heart) and Ka (Spirit). This ancient belief is the basis of the Concerto for Orchestra. The work is divided into three movements as a representation or musical abstraction of the life of ones soul or musical journey. 

Through each movement, the ideas of Name (melody), Soul (harmony), Shadow (form) and Heart (rhythm) are developed until the moment of Ka (catharsis) is reached when all five elements converge bringing about rebirth. Like the human soul, I have tried to translate the five parts of the human soul into the basic elements that create a piece of music. From birth, these musical elements are introduced, developed, reintroduced and by the end or death, only the essence remains, the soul.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/02/2012

FOUMAI, Michael-Thomas

The Light Bringer

2011

14:00

Michael-Thomas FOUMAI

The Light Bringer

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 14:00

Instrumentation:

3233.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Michael-Thomas Foumai (b. 1987, Honolulu, HI) earned a bachelor in music composition from the University of Hawaii and currently studies at the University Michigan. His music has been performed in the US, China, Japan, South Korea, Indonesia and Thailand. His mentors include Robert Beaser, Tristan Murail, Michael Gordon, Xu Shuya, Jia Daqun, Neil McKay and Jon Magnussen. He has studied with Bright Sheng, Michael Daugherty, Peter Askim, Byron Yasui, Donald Reid Womack, Takeo Kudo and Thomas Osborne. Recent performances of his music have been presented at the Osaka College of Music, Shanghai Conservatory of Music, Yogyakarta Contemporary Music Festival, Thailand International Composition Festival, MidWest Composers Symposium, Fresno New Music Festival and the Calarts Theatre at Disney Hall. This performance of the Light-Bringer marks the first time Mr. Foumai’s work has been performed by a professional orchestra.

About Piece:

The Light-Bringer alludes to the story of the fallen angel, Lucifer, who strove to usurp God’s power and was cast out of heaven as punishment. (The Latin name “Lucifer” literally translates as “light-bringer.”) But rather than represent this narrative programmatically through music, the piece is structured around the number 666, “the number of the beast” mentioned in Revelation 13:18. While this number has at times been interpreted as a reference to ancient emperors, religious leaders, or modern governments, it has traditionally been accepted as a symbol of an antichrist aligned with Lucifer and therefore another representation of Lucifer.
 
With that pretext in mind, the number six is embedded within the structure of the work. This can be heard on a small level with musical motives and sonorities being repeated six times, melodic and harmonic intervals of sixths and its inversions, a melody or harmony of six pitches, a progression of six chords. On a larger level, the work is built on six major sections with the main climax occurring roughly 666 seconds (eleven minutes and six seconds) into the work. On a visual and performance level, tempo markings are all multiples of six.
 
The work is in one movement but maintains the contrast of tempo and sectional structure typical of a symphony (a tripartite structure representing God’s Trinity and ultimately the foretelling of Lucifer’s doom) . It begins with six block chords from the brass, played while strings sustain subtly shifting sonorities. Then the instrumentation is reversed, with the repeated block chords played by the strings. After a series of variations on these motifs, the music shifts suddenly into a vigorous symphonic scherzo with energized passage of agitated sixteenth-notes - a cosmic battle-scene, perhaps, as angels swoop with clashing swords in aerial combat. It is war music in its evolution of epic conflict and dramatic rupture.
 
The subsequent section can be seen as a traditional slow movement. In a restrained tempo, but maintaining the emotional intensity, it is the relative calm before the final storm. The reduced dynamics and slower surface rhythms, combined with gentle harp punctuations, create an anticipation of the finale. In the concluding section, all the preceding rhythmic and textual-motifs are recalled for a final, climactic reckoning. At the peak of the dramatic intensity Lucifer is divinely banished and slinks away to a dark pianissimo abyss in the double basses, as harp and timpani toll his demise with faltering weakening pulses. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 02/09/2011

FORREST, Cody

To See the Stars Again

2015

7:30

Cody FORREST

To See the Stars Again

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 7:30

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Cody W. Forrest (b. 1988) is currently pursuing his Doctor of Musical Arts at New England Conservatory, where his string quartet, Book of Prayers, was a winner of the 2013 Honors Ensemble Competition. His music has been performed by the Syracuse University Wind Ensemble, Contemporary Music Ensemble, and Concerti Ensemble, hornist William Scharnberg, and harpsichordist Christoph Hammer, and he has been commissioned by Daniel Hege, the University of North Texas Theatre Department, and Kyle Hutchins of AVIDduo. Also of note, Forrest was a recipient of the 2014 ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award for his piece To See the Stars Again.

About Piece:

I also wanted each movement to have an almost self-contained musical language - movements that are very different to one another, at least on the surface. I wanted them to be almost like a set of style studies, but of no styles in particular. That said, the “style” of each movement is not unique. There are clear influences at play. (This was an exercise in craft more than anything else, and I felt easy about writing something that is so clearly in debt to the craft of others.)

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Cody Forrest's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Stefan Sanders

Date of reading: 02/11/2015

FINLAYSON, Jonathan

If not for the Moon

2016

5:05

Jonathan FINLAYSON

If not for the Moon

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 5:05

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+1.pno.str

About Composer:

Born in 1982 in Berkeley, CA, Jonathan Finlayson began playing the trumpet at the age of ten in the Oakland public school system. He came under the tutelage of Bay Area legend Robert Porter, a veteran trumpeter from the bebop era who took Finlayson under his wing; he was often seen accompanying Porter on his gigs about town and sitting in on the popular Sunday nights jam session at the Bird Cage. He subsequently attended the New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music where he studied with Eddie Henderson, Jimmy Owens and Cecil Bridgewater.
Finlayson is a disciple of the saxophonist/composer/conceptualist Steve Coleman, having joined his band Five Elements in 2000 at the age of 18. He is widely admired for his ability to tackle cutting-edge musical concepts with aplomb. Finlayson has performed and recorded in groups led by Steve Lehman, Mary Halvorson, Craig Taborn, Henry Threadgill and played alongside notables such as Von Freeman, Jason Moran, Dafnis Prieto and Vijay Iyer.

About Piece:

I started the writing process by sorting through a variety of harmonic  structures that I sensed would go well with the instruments of the orchestra that I was unfamiliar with. I tried to imagine the many ways these structures could be colored and how they’d sound coming from various combinations of instruments. Having somewhat established things vertically I was then able to begin thinking about form and how things would proceed rhythmically. The fun and challenge thus far in the writing process has been trying to find a place for my ideas in this larger sonic palette while keeping a sense of balance amidst all the instruments and  possibilities.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orhcestra Institute Readings ACO

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/16/2016

FAHEY, Peter

Impressions

2012

10:00

Peter FAHEY

Impressions

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

3*33*3*.4331.timp+3.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Peter Fahey is a composer, arranger, and sometimes conductor. Born and raised in Ireland, he studied composition with Eric Sweeney at the Waterford Institute of Technology, with David Horne and Anthony Gilbert at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester, England, and, informally, at the Hochschule für Musik FRANZ LISZT Weimar, Germany, where he was the 2007 Franz Liszt Stipendiat. He has also attended the Darmstadt Ferienkurse für Neue Musik, the TACTUS Young Composers' Forum, Belgium, the Weimarer Meisterkurse Kompositions-Workshop, and the Aspen Music Festival and School Advanced Masterclass Program. Since 2008, Peter has studied with Roberto Sierra and Steven Stucky at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, and he is currently an exchange scholar at Columbia University. Current projects include new works for the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble and the Momenta Quartet. He can be heard as arranger on Ian Doyle-The Man Whom's new album "The Greatest Event".

About Piece:

I began writing “Impressions” with a handful of self-consciously simple ideas in mind. I was thinking about how so many of the composers I admire can take what is basically a very simple idea, an idea that can seem almost naïve to begin with, put it through their compositional mill, and end up with surprisingly complex results. This was a process I wanted to somehow try and replicate in my own music. I based each movement on just one or two very simple ideas, and, at the very least, I would try to keep the clarity and definition of these basic ideas in tact as I began to fleshed them out: gradually moving from unpitched to pitched sound (or less sonorous to more sonorous) in the first movement; a slow, unaccompanied melody played in unison, but somehow “blurred” in the second movement; and a “tintinnabulation” of high-pitched sounds, and another unison, this time fragmented (“splintered”) rather than blurred in the third movement. I wanted to move towards complexity but not complicatedness, and, above all, I wanted results that were very musical.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Peter Fahey's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/02/2012

EOTVOS, Melody

Beetles, Dragons and Dreamers

2014

12:15

Melody EOTVOS

Beetles, Dragons and Dreamers

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 12:15

Instrumentation:

2*12*2*.4221.3perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Melody Eötvös (1984) is a Bloomington IN-based Australian composer whose work draws on both multi-media and traditional instrumental contexts, as well substantial extra-musical references to a broad range of philosophical topics and late 19th Century literature. 
 
She has studied with a variety of composers across the globe, including Gerardo Dirié (Australia), Simon Bainbridge (UK), Claude Baker (US) and has studied electronic music with Jeffrey Hass, John Gibson, and Alicyn Warren.  Melody has been the recipient of various awards including the 3MBS National Composers Award (Australia 2009), an APRA PDA (Australia 2009), and the Soundstream National Composer Award (2012).  She has had her music performed by ensembles/orchestras such as the London Sinfonietta, BBC Singers, Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, and the Australian String Quartet, and has participated in several electronic music festivals including SEAMUS 2011 (US), ACMC 2012 (Australia), and ICMC 2011 (New Zealand).  Current projects include a commission from Music Viva Australia (Sydney), an Australia Council Grant to compose a new piano sonata for Bernadette Harvey (Sydney), and composer fellow for the Intimacy of Creativity 2014, Hong Kong.
 
Melody holds a Doctor of Music (2014) from Indiana University Jacobs School of Music and a Master of Music (2008) from the Royal Academy of Music, London UK. 

Melody Eötvös is a recipient of the League of American Orchestras Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation Women Composers Commision. 

About Piece:

This piece draws its inspiration from the concept of four Mythological or Ancient ‘relics’ that, over the ages, have been carried forward into the present time with their meaning gradually transformed or altered to represent something more modern but still commonly encountered in our western culture.   

Draconian Measures makes reference to Draco (600BCE), the first legislator of Ancient Rome who was known for instituting particularly harsh, cruel and unforgiving laws.  

Lilith, Begone is primarily conceived of as a lullaby.  The word ‘lullaby’ originated from the Jewish ‘Lilith-Abi’ which translates as ‘Lilith, begone’.   In particular versions of Jewish folklore Lilith was known as Adam’s first wife and she was molded, by God, out of the same dust as Adam (whereas Eve is said to have been made from one of Adams ribs).  Because if this she saw herself as Adam’s equal and did not respond well to his desire to rule over her.  Eventually she left Adam and the Garden of Eden.  However, she was pursued by three angels.  They demanded she return to the Garden and upon refusing she vowed to forever steal the souls of little children as vengeance on Adam’s suppressive treatment of her.  The angels would not agree to this and so Lilith made the condition that if the mother of the child hung an amulet above the baby as it slept in its cradle, Lilith would pass over that child.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Melody Eotvos's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

ELDAR, Sivan

A Thousand Tongues

2014

5:30

Sivan ELDAR

A Thousand Tongues

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 5:30

Instrumentation:

222*2.2220.timp+1.str

About Composer:

Composer Sivan Eldar’s works have been performed in France, Ukraine, Italy, Germany, Israel and the US, and at historic halls such as Boston’s Jordan Hall and King’s Chapel, New Mexico’s Montezuma Castle, Odessa’s Philharmonic Theatre, Tuscany’s Palazzo Mansi, and Paris’s Salle Cortot.

Her composition Pont d’Arc won 1st place at the Josef Dorfman International Composition Competition in Germany and was performed in celebration of Israel’s 60th anniversary by members of the Odessa Philharmonic Orchestra. Among her other recent works are Mutable Music for piano and live processing (for pianist Gloria Cheng), Archive[s] for amplified violin, cello and video projection (for Italian duo E110), Crumb Childfor clarinet and orchestra (for clarinetist Ashraf Attalla and the Odessa Philharmonic), A Note on Triumph for electric violin, playback and live processing (for the HighScore Festival), Avere Generosa for two organs and piano (for the ISAM festival, Germany), and Quodlibet V for string quartet (for Quartetto Mansi Project, Lucca). In addition to working with new music ensembles and soloists, Sivan has collaborated with visual and media artists, including Brandeis University Resident Scholar photographer Emily Corbato on Music for Photography for the 2007 New Gallery Concert Series, and Korean filmmaker Minji Kang on her experimental film Azalea, a 2006 Independents’ Film Festival Showcase Official Selection. She also recently collaborated with her brother on an audiovisual installation for the Catharine Clark Gallery in San Francisco, and with motion graphics artist Devin Earthman.  

Stylistically, Sivan has been deeply influenced by her studies of sound design at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and psychoacoustics at the New England Conservatory. This has led her to focus on electroacoustic composition and new media art in her graduate studies, working at UC Berkeley’s Center for New Media and Audio Technologies (CNMAT) and Center for New Media (BCNM). On the opposite side of the spectrum, she has also been deeply influenced by Inuit music and poetry since her high school years, which resulted in works like her Pisik Cycle, and study of Katajjaq in Arctic Canada.

Beyond composing, Sivan is involved in music theory and education. She has taught for McGill University at the Nunavut Arctic College in Canada, and has served on the theory faculty of the Ip Piano School in Boston. She was also guest speaker at the 2008 International Society of Hildegard von Bingen Studies, and the 2009 First Annual Symposium on Music in the 21st Century at San Francisco State University, where she presented a paper on Olivier Messiaen’s Cinq Rechants. She is currently teaching composition and analysis at the John Adams Young Composers Program, and theory and musicianship at UC Berkeley’s music department.

A native of Israel, Sivan came to the US at the age of 15 as one of eight recipients of the United World College Scholarship to the Armand Hammer World College in New Mexico. Since then she has received scholarships from the Boston Conservatory, New England Conservatory and Hearst Foundation, which allowed her to further her education in the US. She has participated in composition festivals in France (European American Musical Alliance), Germany (International Summer Academy of Music), Italy (Accademia Musicale Chigiana) where she received the Composition Diploma of Merit from Maestro Azio Corghi, and most recently the US (June in Buffalo). She will be spending the 2012-13 academic year as a Fulbright fellow at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague. Sivan is a graduate of the New England Conservatory (BM), where she studied with composer Pozzi Escot. She is currently a fellow at UC Berkeley, where she is working towards her PhD in Composition and New Media with Professors Ed Campion and Ken Goldberg.

About Piece:

I have spent the past year living in Prague, collaborating with local musicians, dancers, and visual artists. The work we created together allowed me to see Prague – its streets, its language, its heroes – through their colorful eyes. To discover secret places, stories and sounds. This composition is dedicated to them. It is both personal and voyeuristic. It is a peculiar hybrid organism – at times sentimental, at times playful, at times frightening – brought to life through the symphony orchestra.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Sivan Eldar's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony Under Construction

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/04/2014

EISENSTADT, Harris

Palimpsest

2011

6:05

Harris EISENSTADT

Palimpsest

Year Composed: 2011

Timing (in minutes): 6:05

Instrumentation:

2222*.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Harris Eisenstadt… takes a fixer’s approach to music making, looking for ways to fit the pieces together. In his own music especially, he often seems intent on extracting consonance from dissonance or forging ungainliness into grace" (Nate Chinen, The New York Times). Critics have called him "one of the new generation's leading composers" (Troy Collins, AllAboutJazz.com) and "one of the most creative and skilled musician/composers incorporating traditional material to create new and vital improvised music" (Robert Iannapollo, AllAboutJazz-New York).  The Village Voice's Jim Macnie adds, "He's perpetually building new ensembles to suit the variety of music he hears in his head—that's what composers do.

About Piece:

Palimpsest is scored for piccolo, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinet, bass clarinet, 2 bassoons (2nd alternating on contrabassoon), 2 French horns, 2 trumpets, 2 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, piano, and strings. The word comes from the Greek palimpsestos, meaning “a papyrus or other kind of writing material on which two or more sets of writing had been superimposed in such a way that, because of imperfect erasure, some of the earlier text could be read through the later over-writing.” (From the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology)

I sketched most of the material summer 2010 and, after seemingly endless revisions, “completed” the piece March 2011. I include quotation marks around “completed” because, as Derek Bermel cited to me from Paul Valéry regarding my discomfort in submitting a final draft, thereby surrendering further opportunities for revision: “a poem is never finished, only abandoned.” Palimpsest is essentially finished, but feels abandoned somehow. Perhaps the process is more important than the end result, though admittedly, I can’t wait to listen to it rehearsed and read.
 
Palimpsest is divided into three sections: fast, slow and fast. Ascending chromatic runs, descending triplet figures, string glissandi and tremolos, a measured accelerando, and a foreshadowing of quarter-note triplet hocketing in the winds and brass populate the first minutes. The slow section juxtaposes extended string hocketing with solo statements from the French horn and English horn. Eventually a mournful solo passes from tuba to contrabassoon, juxtaposed with a somber melody in the first violins and violas. The concluding fast section picks up where the first left off; chromatic runs - ascending and descending, polyrhythmic punctuations in the strings, ghosts of the string hocketing now in the winds, brass and percussion, and a final almost-tutti measured accelerando.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orch Inst Reading

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/06/2011

DOUGHERTY, William

Into Focus

2014

13:30

William DOUGHERTY

Into Focus

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 13:30

Instrumentation:

3232.4221.timp+3.pno.str

About Composer:

William Dougherty (b. 1988) was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1988 and currently resides in Basel, Switzerland. He has had his works performed internationally by ensembles including the Orchestre National de Lorraine, the BBC Singers, the London Chorus, the Lontano Ensemble, the Nemascae Lemanic Modern Ensemble, and the Ligeti String Quartet in venues such as the Southbank Centre in London, the Kimmel Center in Philadelphia, and the Trinity Chapel in Fontainebleau, France. His music has been broadcast on BBC Radio 3 and the Financial Times podcast ‘FT Science.’ Dougherty has received recognitions and awards from the BMI Student Composer Awards, the PRS for Music Society, Sound and Music, the King James Bible Trust, the American Composers Forum, the Philadelphia Orchestra Association, Le Conservatoire Americain de Fontainebleau, the Institute for European Studies (Vienna), and the UK Foreign Aid and Commonwealth Office. As a student of composition, William has studied and participated in masterclasses with composers such as Philippe Hurel, Hughes Dufourt, Beat Furrer, Pierluigi Billone, and Mark Andre. As a scholar, William has written and presented research into the life and works of Romanian composer, Horatiu Radulescu, in the UK and Switzerland. His recent article on Radulescu’s 5th String Quartet ‘before the universe was born’ can be found in the quarterly contemporary music journal, TEMPO.

About Piece:

Into Focus is a work that seeks to aurally explore the three areas of visual perception known as the focus, fringe, and margin. These three regions of a human’s vision, depending on where the viewer’s attention is directed, have widely varying degrees of resolution and detail. Through a continual blending of harmonic blocks that fade in and out, in volume level, tuning, and instrumentation, Into Focus strives to evoke these blurry areas of visual perception through the medium of sound. From one harmony to the next, the listener is taken on a journey of continually unfolding perceptual interplay where tonal regions meld together, making a dense landscape of harmonic ambiguity and constant dynamism.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot New York Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Matthias Pintscher

Date of reading: 06/03/2014

DJUPSTROM, Michael

Scène et pas de deux

2011

8:00

Michael DJUPSTROM

Scène et pas de deux

Year Composed: 2010

Timing (in minutes): 8:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.4231.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

The work of composer and pianist Michael Djupstrom has been recognized through honors and awards from institutions such as the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the American Composers Forum, the Lotte Lehmann Foundation, the Académie musicale de Villecroze, the Chinese Fine Arts Society, the ASCAP Foundation, and the BMI Foundation, among others.  Notable performers of his works include the American Composers Orchestra, the Tokyo Kosei Wind Orchestra, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus, Symphony in C, and numerous new music ensembles such as Brave New Works, Sounds New, the North/South Consonance Ensemble, the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, and the New Fromm Players at Tanglewood.

Djupstrom was born in St. Paul, Minnesota (USA) in 1980 and began music studies at the age of eight.  He studied composition formally at the University of Michigan, from which he received undergraduate and graduate degrees.  Other training included fellowships at the Tanglewood Music Center, the Aspen Music Festival, and the Brevard Music Center, as well as studies in Paris with composer Betsy Jolas.  He currently lives in Philadelphia, where he teaches piano at Settlement Music School and courses in music theory and orchestration for Boston University’s online programs in music.  In addition, in the fall of 2009, he entered the Curtis Institute of Music as a composition student of Jennifer Higdon and Richard Danielpour.

About Piece:

Scene is a general designation for any situation in which some kind of narrative is unfolding. The "pas de deux" is more specific: a part of the ballet choreographed for only two dancers. Although my pas de deux is freely written and emerges directly from the preceding music, its passionate lyrical character still sets it sharply apart from the highly rhythmic music that makes up the rest of the work.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/04/2011

DIBERARDINO, Nick

Mercury-Redstone 3

2017

7:25

Nick DIBERARDINO

Mercury-Redstone 3

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 7:25

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.tomp.3perc.harp.pno*.str.

About Composer:

Rhodes Scholar (b. 1989), hailed as a “bright young star” and a “first-rate talent” by the Portland Press Herald, composes music that is diverse in style but always oriented toward meaningful narrative arcs. DiBerardino has received recognition from many institutions, including the Music Teachers’ National Association, the National Federation of Music Clubs, the New York Art Ensemble, the Boston New Music Initiative, PARMA Recordings, the New York Youth Symphony, ASCAP, and the American Composers Forum. Recent accolades include winning the Portland Chamber Music Festival Composition Competition, garnering a soundSCAPE Composition Prize, and receiving a Horizon Award from Connecticut’s Westport Arts Advisory Committee, given to young artists who have achieved “measurable excellence” in their field. DiBerardino’s orchestral music has been programmed by the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, the Chamber Orchestra of Philadelphia, and the Minnesota Orchestra. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Princeton University and an M.Phil with distinction the University of Oxford, and also holds an M.M. from the Yale School of Music. He furthered his studies with the New York Youth Symphony, the European American Musical Alliance, the Brevard Music Center, the Aspen Music Festival, the Norfolk New Music Workshop, the highSCORE festival, the soundSCAPE festival, and the Bowdoin International Music Festival, where his work was featured on the Charles E. Gamper Festival of Contemporary Music. He serves as the musical studies lead instructor and curriculum coordinator at Curtis’ Young Artist Summer Program and is currently composer-in-residence at the Luzerne Music Center. DiBerardino is pursuing a Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in composition at the Curtis Institute of Music, where he has studied with Jennifer Higdon and David Ludwig.

About Piece:

Mercury-Redstone 3 is the name of the NASA mission that first sent an American astronaut, Alan Shepard, into space. Today, this tremendous accomplishment has been somewhat overshadowed by two other, more celebrated historical events. The first took place three weeks before Shepard’s suborbital flight: the Soviet Union launched Yuri Gagarin into space, beating the States to the punch. Then, just over eight months later, NASA launched John Glenn all the way into orbit aboard Mercury-Atlas 6. But the somewhat unheralded nature of the Mercury-Redstone 3 mission imbues it with a special quality for me. To imagine that first U.S. spaceflight is to think of the unadulterated thrill of exploration and an unfathomable exhilaration. What must it have felt like to be among the first to touch the sky? I hope to capture in this piece some of the sense of wonder and excitement that NASA, and the sheer audacity of human spaceflight, have brought me since I was young.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/23/2017

DIAZ, James

From Infinity

2017

13:36

James DIAZ

From Infinity

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 13:36

Instrumentation:

3*3*3*3.43*31.timp.3perc.harp.pno.str

About Composer:

New York-based composer James Diaz (b. 1990) is the winner of the 2015 National Prize of Music in Composition by the Ministry of Culture of Colombia for his Concerto for Percussion Trio and Orchestra, Saturn Lights. As winner of the 2014 Prize of Music in Composition for the reopening of the Teatro Colón, his orchestral piece Eclosion was premiered by conductor Claudio Cruz and the National Symphony Orchestra of Colombia and recently has been recorded by the conductor Cecilia Espinosa and the EAFIT Symphony Orchestra for the upcoming album, New Colombian Music for Orchestra. Diaz has also won several competitions for his chamber and wind ensemble music, including the 2015 Coral and Symphony Composition Award by the Bogotá Philharmonic, the 2013 Composition Prize of the International Winter Festival of Campos do Jordão for his string quartet Dynamics of Meteorite and the XV National Award for Musical Composition City of Bogotá by the Bogotá Philharmonic for his work Iron Curtains. Diaz studied composition with Moisés Bertrán, Harold Vázquez and Gustavo Parra at the National Conservatory of Music, where he received his B.M. in Composition in 2015. He was a two-time Composition Fellow at the International Winter Festival of Campos do Jordao, Brazil; and is currently pursuing an M.M. in Composition at the Manhattan School of Music, where he is studying composition with Reiko Fueting.

About Piece:

From infinity for orchestra is an imaginary perspective of an unreal landscape. The work is mainly composed by the juxtaposition and contraposition of colorful textures that present different points of view of this temporal reality. The unreal landscape is inspired by the question “What would be our reaction if we could see our planet, our home, our bodies from a long distance?” As an answer, I created a nonexistent plane that will take us from common spaces to distorted atmospheres. Floating bright and suspended patterns and textures represent a sort of spatial aloneness. On the other hand, a fanfare-like texture evokes a kind of human spirit that is full of energy, unstable and heavy. The first sketch of the piece was composed in Bogotá in 2015, and it was finished one year later in New York City in 2016.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to James Diaz's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/23/2017

DESSEN, Michael

Slippages

2013

7:10

Michael DESSEN

Slippages

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 7:10

Instrumentation:

222*2.2221.timp+1.str

About Composer:

Michael Dessen is a composer-improviser who performs on the slide trombone and computer. Active in a variety of ensembles as leader or collaborator, he creates music for improvisers and engages new technologies of telepresence and digital networking. His music has been praised by critics in numerous jazz and contemporary music publications, and recorded on labels such as Clean Feed, Cuneiform, and Circumvention. Dessen’s teachers include Yusef Lateef, George Lewis, and Anthony Davis, and he has also been schooled through extensive freelance experiences ranging from salsa bands to avant-garde new music ensembles. He has published writings on music and culture, and is a graduate of the Eastman School of Music, the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and the University of California, San Diego. In 2006, he joined the music faculty of the University of California, Irvine, where he recently co-founded a new MFA emphasis in Integrated Composition, Improvisation and Technology (ICIT).

About Piece:

Inspired by experiences with family members experiencing dementia and coma recovery, Slippages is a multifaceted meditation on the fluidity of our self-consciousness. More than expressing sadness or a loss of control, the piece moves through a range of emotional spaces seeking musical expression for those moments that function like hinges between disparate states of perception and experience. In musical terms, the piece explores the seductive power of texture and color to momentarily pull us out of the narrative directionality of melodic development.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute La Jolla Symphony

Conductor: Steven Schick

Date of reading: 09/20/2013

DA SILVA, Patricio

Three Pieces for Orchestra

2009

16:30

Patricio DA SILVA

Three Pieces for Orchestra

Year Composed: 2008

Timing (in minutes): 16:30

Instrumentation:

2222.2200.timp+1.str

About Composer:

Patrício da Silva (1973) received formal musical training at the Escola Superior de Música de Lisboa de Lisboa where he studied piano with Jorge Moyano and composition with António Pinho Vargas (B.M. in piano, 1995). He then pursued his composition studies in the US, first as a recipient of the Betty Freeman Foundation Scholarship in Composition with Morton Subotnick, Stephen L. Mosko, and Mel Powell at the California Institute of the Arts (MFA, 1999), and later, with support from the Fundação Luso-Americana para o Desenvolvimento (Portugal), he completed the Ph.D. program in composition at the University of California (2003), having studied composition with William Kraft, computer music with Curtis Roads, and algorithmic composition and music with Artificial Intelligence with David Cope. Further studies in the US include work with Michael Gandolfi, John Harbison, and Sydney Hodkinson, Augusta Read-Thomas and Bernard Rands, and seminars with Helmut Lachenman and Karlheinz Stockhausen, in Germany. His post-doctoral work as invited researcher at IRCAM in France was followed in the UK by a research grant for computer music by the Portuguese Foundation of Science and Technology. Awards include the International Barto Prize, the Gould Family Foundation Composers Award, the Ojai Festival Music for Tomorrow, the Otto Eckstein Family Fellowship, the Susan and Ford Schumann Fellowship, and residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Atlantic Center for the Arts. His music has been recently heard at Tanglewood, Ojai Music Festival, Aspen, Ruhr Festival, Schleswig Holstein Music Festival, Historische Stadthalle Wuppertal, Bayer Erholungshaus, London Festival of American Music, Piano Spheres, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Zipper Hall, Cistermúsica, International Music Festival Póvoa do Varzim, Yamaha's YASI, SCRIME, and Los Angeles Sonic Odyssey. His music has been played by notable soloists and ensembles including the Berkeley Symphony, California Ear-Unit, Lontano, Moscow Piano Quartet, New Century Players, New Fromm Players, Orquestra do Algarve, Shakespeare & Co., Stefan Asbury, Tzimon Barto, Gloria Cheng, Joana Carneiro, Cesário Costa, William Eddins, Lorenz Gamma, David Gutkin, Paul Haas, Brian Pezzone, José Rodilla, Mark Robson, Ming Tsu, Laurent Wagner, and Lei Weng. Following the International Barto Prize, American pianist Tzimon Barto has toured with da Silva's piano music to enthusiastic audiences in Europe, including a special fund-raising concert for the Beethoven-Haus in Bonn in 2008 to acquire the manuscript of Beethoven's Diabelli Variations. A new CD, Hyper-Counterpointt, is scheduled for release in May of 2009.

About Piece:


                        

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Memphis Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: David Loebel

Date of reading: 05/21/2009

COOLEY, Emily

Green Go to Me

2015

6:30

Emily COOLEY

Green Go to Me

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 6:30

Instrumentation:

2222.2220.timp+1.pno.str

About Composer:

Emily Cooley (b. 1990) is a composer of orchestral, chamber, and vocal music that ranges from delicate intensity to a pulsing, energetic sound described as "dramatic, forceful and filled with reverberation" (Sioux City Journal). In 2015, Emily was awarded a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her music has received additional awards and recognition from the National Federation of Music Clubs, Tribeca New Music, ASCAP, the Renée B. Fisher Foundation, and others. 

Emily has received commissions and performances from ensembles including the Cabrillo Festival Orchestra, the Curtis Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, the Sioux City Symphony Orchestra, the JACK Quartet, the Fifth House Ensemble, and Music from Copland House. She has been a fellow at the Norfolk New Music Workshop, the Wellesley Composers Conference, CULTIVATE at Copland House, and the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music.

A native of Milwaukee, WI, Emily is a recent graduate of the USC Thornton School of Music and Yale University, where she was awarded the Louis Sudler Prize for excellence in the creative arts. Past teachers include Stephen Hartke, Donald Crockett, Andrew Norman, Kathryn Alexander, and John K. Boyle. Emily currently holds the Milton L. Rock Composition Fellowship at the Curtis Institute of Music, where she studies with David Ludwig.

About Piece:

Lately I've become interested in writing pieces that consist of only one section, usually in the form of a long, slow build of density and variety in sound. This piece takes that model: there are no delineated sections and no transitions, just the goal of reaching the ending and revealing the core of this music's material. Different layers weave in and out of the orchestral texture, with the clarinets leading the more lyrical nature of the piece, the percussionist activating a sound 'object' that acts as an on/off switch for certain musical events, and the piano and second violins playing out a ritualistic pattern of bell-like chords. 

One of the inspirations for this piece is the work of California artist Andres Amador, whose sand murals flourish into massive and stunning images, but are inevitably washed away by the ocean.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Emily Cooley's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony New Music Reading

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/03/2015

CHODOS, Tobin

Control Flow

2013

9:05

Tobin CHODOS

Control Flow

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 9:05

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Tobin Chodos is a composer and jazz pianist.  He was awarded a Dave Brubeck Fellowship in 2003, graduated magna cum laude with a degree in Ancient Greek and Latin from Columbia University, and is currently studying music composition as a Regents' Fellow at the University of California, Santa Cruz.  He has performed around the world as a jazz pianist and his compositions have been performed by numerous ensembles in California and New York City.  His debut album, Salmon Up, was released in 2012.

About Piece:

One of the problems that the symphony orchestra presents to the contemporary composer is that it seems to embody the hierarchies and stratification of the aristocratic classes that it was originally devised to entertain.  In Control Flow, I respond to this issue by exploring various kinds of musical control. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Tobin Chodos's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute La Jolla Symphony

Conductor: Steven Schick

Date of reading: 09/20/2013

CHIAPPETTA, Louis

Chroma

2013

7:45

Louis CHIAPPETTA

Chroma

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 7:45

Instrumentation:

3333.4321.4perc.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

New York composer, Louis Chiappetta began studying composition at Mannes College of Music’s Preparatory Division at the age of 13. He is a graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music, receiving a bachelor’s degree studying with Keith Fitch. In 2011, Chiappetta was awarded a Fulbright Grant to study with Julian Anderson at the Guildhall School of Music in London. His works have been performed at London’s Wigmore Hall, New York’s Carnegie Hall, Aspen Music Festival and School, Dartington International Summer School (UK), and MusicX Festival (Switzerland). Chiappetta has won several prizes including an ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award (2010), the American Academy of Arts and Letters Charles Ives Scholarship (2011), and the Cleveland Institute of Music Donald Erb Prize (2011).His recent projects have included Fracture, a series of clarinet miniatures written in collaboration with choreographer Thomas Peacock and the London Contemporary Dance School, Echoes of Embers for baritone and small ensemble, and Chroma for orchestra. In 2012 Chiappetta participated in a professional training workshop at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute where he studied with  Kaija Saariaho and Anssi Karttunen. As a participant, his trio Loops, Clocks, and Shadows was premiered at Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall.

About Piece:

New York composer, Louis Chiappetta began studying composition at Mannes College of Music’s Preparatory Division at the age of 13. He is a graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Music, receiving a bachelor’s degree studying with Keith Fitch. In 2011, Chiappetta was awarded a Fulbright Grant to study with Julian Anderson at the Guildhall School of Music in London. His works have been performed at London’s Wigmore Hall, New York’s Carnegie Hall, Aspen Music Festival and School, Dartington International Summer School (UK), and MusicX Festival (Switzerland). Chiappetta has won several prizes including an ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composer Award (2010), the American Academy of Arts and Letters Charles Ives Scholarship (2011), and the Cleveland Institute of Music Donald Erb Prize (2011).His recent projects have included Fracture, a series of clarinet miniatures written in collaboration with choreographer Thomas Peacock and the London Contemporary Dance School, Echoes of Embers for baritone and small ensemble, and Chroma for orchestra. In 2012 Chiappetta participated in a professional training workshop at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Music Institute where he studied with  Kaija Saariaho and Anssi Karttunen. As a participant, his trio Loops, Clocks, and Shadows was premiered at Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Hall.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 04/09/2013

CHEN, Janet Jieru

Beyond Distance

2011

12:00

Janet Jieru CHEN

Beyond Distance

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 12:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.4221.timp+2pno.str

About Composer:

A native of Taiwan, Janet Jieru Chen’s music has been performed by groups, such as the Luxembourg Sinfonietta, the Orchestre National de Lorraine, the Présence Contemporaine, the Eighth Blackbird, the Alarm Will Sound, the VERGE ensemble, the Borealis String Quartet, the Kochi Ensemble, the Banff Chamber Ensemble, and Cantai Music Group. 
She has won several prizes, including the first prize of ALEA III International Composition Competition (2009), the winner of Orchestra’s Choice Award, Audiences’ Choice Award and Second Prize of 2009 National Taiwan Symphony Orchestra Young Composers Composition Competition for Orchestra; ISCM-ACL Young Composers Awards, William Klenz Prize, Judith Lang Zaimont Prize. 
She has also received scholarships to attend international music festivals and residencies including the Millay Colony for the Arts, the June in Buffalo, the International Music Courses in Darmstadt, the Composers Conference at Wellesley, the International Gaudeamus Music Week, the Acanthes Music Festivals, the Banff Summer Arts Festival and the Cantai Summer Music Festival.
Ms. Chen not only demonstrates her talent in music composition, but also reveals her superb arts administrative management skill. She is now the administrative director of Canada-Taiwan Music and Arts Exchange and the co-founder of Asian Young Musicians' Connection, promoting contemporary music and chamber music for the young talents. 
She currently is a doctoral candidate at Duke University, where she is studying with Prof. Stephen Jaffe.

About Piece:

My idea was to transform the image of distance in its different aspects. My title refers not only to physical distance, but also mental distance. The third and sixth movements express physical distance, while the other movements involve my emotions of distance between memories, reality and illusion, existing, vanishing and beyond. When I finished composing it, I realized this piece suggests freedom without distances, that is, overcoming bounderies of distance.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/04/2011

CHASE, Ryan

The Light Fantastic

2012

12:15

Ryan CHASE

The Light Fantastic

Year Composed: 2012

Timing (in minutes): 12:15

Instrumentation:

3333.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Ryan Chase, a member of ASCAP, has had music performed by ensembles such as Alaria, CIRCE, Contemporaneous, Indiana University’s New Music Ensemble, Mannes Orchestra, Chelsea Symphony, Mexico City Woodwind Quintet, SUNY Purchase Percussion Ensemble, and new music soprano soloist Ariadne Greif. Chase’s awards include the William Schuman Prize of the 2011 BMI Student Composer Awards, the 2010 IU Dean's Prize, 1st Prize in the 2011 National Association of Composers USA Young Composers' Competition, and the 2008 Bohuslav Martinú Award. As a multimedia collaborator, Ryan has worked with directors, dancers, and visual artists. He recently completed the score for director Maria Dirolf's short film The Harbinger. This season features the world premiere of a concert-length ballet, The Pattern of the Heavens, commissioned and produced by choreographer Lauren Weber Frederick. Ryan is currently pursuing a DM at Indiana University. 

About Piece:

While there isn’t a specific program attached to the music, I feel that the phrase “tripping the light fantastic” accurately describes the general spirit of the piece. The Light Fantastic is a virtuosic whirlwind for the orchestra, exploring the ensemble’s capacity for contrasts ranging from the visceral and bombastic to the intimate and ethereal.

At the heart of this short “concertino for orchestra” are two major motivic ideas: a short melody that is introduced by the piccolo at the very beginning and a repeated-note fanfare at the first major climax of the piece. These two motives are developed, tossed around the ensemble, hidden, found again, chopped up, hastily glued back together, pitted against each other, and finally brought together to drive the piece to its inevitable, thunderous conclusion.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ryan Chase's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/02/2012

CHAN, Alan

Etaoin Shrdlu

2013

4:00

Alan CHAN

Etaoin Shrdlu

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 4:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Alan Chan is a multi-faceted composer with works written for jazz big band, Western and Chinese instruments, and various percussion and chamber ensemble settings. He creates original and innovative music by incorporating an array of styles and music from cultures around the globe, in order to bring a refreshing experience to audiences. He has received commissions and awards from ASCAP, ArtEZ (Netherlands),RTHK4 (Hong Kong), American Composers Forum, St. Matthew's Music Guild, Percussive Arts Society (PAS) and Composers and Authors Society of Hong Kong, among others. His works are currently published by HoneyRock, Meridian and Keyboard Percussion Publications, with upcoming publications from Capstone Records.

About Piece:

Etaoin Shrdlu
Is an orchestral variation that was inspired by a non-sense phrase etoin shrdlu, which appears on newspapers using “hot metal” typesetting – a “run down” of the keys on the Linotype keyboard when errors were made by the operator. ETAOIN SHRDLU explores the possibilities of sound of the orchestra, spontaneity, freedom in form and errors.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Alan Chan's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute La Jolla Symphony

Conductor: Steven Schick

Date of reading: 09/20/2013

CARTER, Ryan

The Clock Behind Me

2015

9:00

Ryan CARTER

The Clock Behind Me

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 9:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.2211.timp+1.pno.str

About Composer:

Praised by the New York Times as "imaginative...like, say, a Martian dance party," Ryan Carter's music has been commissioned by Carnegie Hall, the National Flute Association, the MATA Festival, the Metropolis Ensemble, Present Music, The Milwaukee Children's Choir, and the Calder Quartet, with support from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Jerome Foundation, the American Composers Forum, and Meet the Composer. Ryan has collaborated with the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, the International Contemporary Ensemble, the Nieuw Ensemble, the JACK Quartet, the Mivos Quartet, Quartetto Maurice, the Argento Chamber Ensemble, the Princeton Laptop Orchestra, Transit, NOW Ensemble, and many others. Awards include the Lee Ettelson Award, the Aaron Copland Award, the Left Coast Composition Contest, the National Association of Composers/USA Composer's Competition, and the Publikumspreis at the Heidelberg Spring Festival. Ryan was also a finalist for the 2005 Gaudeamus Prize and was chosen as one of NPR and Q2's favorite "100 Composers Under 40." In addition to composing acoustic music, Ryan is an avid computer musician and programmer. His iMonkeypants app (available for download on the App Store) is an album of algorithmically generated, listener-interactive electronica. Ryan holds degrees from Oberlin Conservatory (BMus), Stony Brook University (MA), and New York University (PhD).

About Piece:

This year seems to be passing quickly. I was thinking of composing a piece about time compressing, and then I watched an interview with Richard Hoffmann, my former teacher who had come to Los Angeles in the 1940s to study privately with Arnold Schoenberg and who became his amanuensis and a close friend of the Schoenberg family. In his interview, Richard told a story of Schoenberg at the end of his life, when he could no longer walk down the stairs of his house and spent all day sitting in his room. There was a clock on the wall in front of him, and one day he asked Richard to put the clock behind him because he didn’t want to know how slowly time was passing.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Ryan Carter's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Berkeley Symphony New Music Reading

Conductor: Joana Carneiro

Date of reading: 05/03/2015

BURRELL, Rosalie

Paved With Gold

2015

11:50

Rosalie BURRELL

Paved With Gold

Year Composed: 2015

Timing (in minutes): 11:50

Instrumentation:

2*222.4231.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Rosalie Burrell’s music has been performed at Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall at Lincoln Center, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Lesher Center for the Arts, the All Women’s National Brass Convention, and at artist residency, Bush Creek Arts.
As an artistic administrator, Rosalie plans, programs, and produces concerts and workshops at venues that have included maximum-security prisons, hospital wards, veteran rehabilitation facilities, and schools. For the last two concert seasons she has been the Artistic Coordinator, Composer and Orchestrator at The Little Orchestra Society, a chamber orchestra that, under the baton of James Judd, performs for young families and children.
She received her Master’s of Music degree from the Mannes School of Music, where she studied with David Tcimpidis, writing primarily chamber music.  In 2013 she was a finalist in the ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composers competition, and won both the Martinu Composition Award, and the 2013 Mannes Orchestra Composition Competition.  Other accolades include the 2012 Jean Schneider Goberman Award second prize for her Piano Quartet, Secret Gardens. For more information, visit RosalieBurrell.com

About Piece:

I was taking long walks through New York City; grime and glitter, glass and iron, duality at every turn. High rise buildings, warehouses, unexpected gardens spilling out between nooks and crannies in the city's walls. Listening, I could hear trains beneath me, planes above me, trucks rumbling by. Turning another corner and the sound would evaporate into air and birdsong. I drew a landscape of New York, not as it exists in any physical sense, but in a sweeping, sensory summary. Lines and rectangles colliding, each a duplicate of the last. Between angular clusters I drew the curved shapes of birds, untethered in the air, sometimes spilling out between blocks, or soaring right over the building clusters. I put a pin in that drawing, right above my desk, and began to compose the shape of that abstract skyline. An orchestral landscape, loud and unbridled, paved with gold. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Columbus Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: Rossen Milanov

Date of reading: 10/29/2015

BRYAN, Courtney

Shedding Skin

2013

6:05

Courtney BRYAN

Shedding Skin

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 6:05

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.str

About Composer:

Courtney Bryan, a native of New Orleans, La, is a prolific and eclectic composer, pianist, and arranger. Her compositions range from solo works to large ensembles in the jazz and new music idioms, film scores, and collaborations of dancers, visual artists, writers, and actors. She performs around the New York area, and is the organist and director of the Institute of Sacred Music at Bethany Baptist Church of Newark, NJ. Courtney has academic degrees from Oberlin Conservatory '04 (BM), Rutgers University '07 (MM), and Columbia University '09 (MA). Recently, Courtney was a Visiting Instructor at Oberlin Conservatory. Currently, she is pursuing a DMA in music composition at Columbia University of New York. She has two self-released recordings, “Quest for Freedom” (2007) and "This Little Light of Mine" (2010).

About Piece:

Shedding Skin for symphonic orchestra, composed by Courtney Bryan, was inspired by the poem of the same name by Harryette Mullen from her book Tree Tall Woman (1981). Shedding Skin was composed for the American Composers Orchestra after attending the Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute 2012, and deals with the concept of “notated improvisation.” Exploring this concept of notating improvisation, I plan to use the symphonic orchestra as a sound world for which I will notate music based on the concept of improvisation and the inspiration of the spirit. 

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

BROWN, Anita

Disarming the Tempest

2013

3:40

Anita BROWN

Disarming the Tempest

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 3:40

Instrumentation:

22*22.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

Anita Brown graduated in 1982 from the University of New Hampshire, Durham, with a degree in music education. In 1995, following an extensive music education career, Brown participated in the BMI Jazz Composers’ Workshop. In 2003, as conductor, contractor and executive producer of the Anita Brown Jazz Orchestra, she released the debut CD - 27 EAST, which appeared in six categories for the 46th Grammy Awards. In 2006 Brown received the first ASCAP/International Jazz Composers’ Symposium New Music Award for Big Band Works for her work The Lighthouse. Besides the Anita Brown Jazz Orchestra, her original works have been performed by The Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, The U.S. Army’s Jazz Ambassadors, BMI New York Jazz Orchestra and many college and high school jazz ensembles. Brown has also appeared as guest lecturer with The Jazz Knights of West Point Military Academy, The International Jazz Composers’ Symposium and several university jazz programs. In 2007 Brown joined the faculty of New Jersey City University and Sarah Lawrence College where she teaches graduate and undergraduate studies in jazz composition.

About Piece:

Disarming The Tempest  is a symphonic poem illuminating the plight of returning combat veterans suffering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).  In AB form, its disjointed A section represents the tempest within, while the lyrical B section offers the inner peace they long for.

Its exposition reveals four short melodic motives derived from four spoken phrases, three of which are among a civilian’s concept of conversation-starters with returning combat veterans.  In this setting these phrases induce a tempest within, rather than help the veteran infantryman feel welcomed and at ease, as they can prompt guilt, pain and indignation. 

The three, increasingly offensive, civilian phrases are  So good to see you!, We’re so glad you made it home alive! and  Did you kill anyone?   The fourth phrase used is the humble veteran’s response, Thank you. Thank you very much.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Anita Brown's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic JCOI

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 04/24/2013

BLUMHOFER, Jonathan

Diversions

2013

8:40

Jonathan BLUMHOFER

Diversions

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 8:40

Instrumentation:

3323.4331.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Jonathan Blumhofer earned his doctorate from Boston University, Master’s degree from the Boston Conservatory, and bachelor’s degree from Wheaton College. His principal teachers were Edwin Childs, Dalit Warshaw, Jan Swafford, Joshua Fineberg, Richard Cornell and Samuel Headrick. Blumhofer also studied with Allain Gaussin and Andre Bon at the American Conservatory in Fontainebleau, and with Ladislav Kubik at the Czech-American Summer Music Institute in Prague.Blumhofer’s compositions have been performed and recorded by a number of ensembles in the United States and Europe, including the Kiev Philharmonic Orchestra, Xanthos Ensemble, Juventas New Music Ensemble, and the Camerata Chicago. His compositions have received numerous awards and honors, including recognition from ASCAP, the Massachusetts Cultural Council, the Longfellow International Composers Competition, Boston University, and the Boston Conservatory, among others. As a writer and scholar, Blumhofer’s research interests include American music (particularly the music of Leonard Bernstein and John Adams), 20th century music, and modern European history. 

About Piece:

Diversions is my first purely orchestral work; as its title suggests, I aimed to write a piece that was entertaining and lighthearted in character. Accordingly, it roughly models any number of 19th century concert overtures, falling into three sections and an overall formal scheme of ABA.

The principle motive of Diversions is a four-note figure that is derived from the main melody of the work, a tune that is heard in full only towards the end of the piece. The inaugural section of Diversions features a series of fanfares that are followed by two tutti orchestral statements of this four-note cell. The tutti statements themselves frame a series of antiphonal dialogues between various sections of the orchestra that are based on the four-note figure. A transitional section follows the second tutti outburst and elides into the slow middle section of the work, which features extended solos for English horn, oboe, and trumpet. The concluding section, marked Allegro vivo, is essentially a set of variations on the four-note cell, beginning with a gentle, lapping gesture and culminating in the grand, triumphant statement of the aforementioned tune.

A word about the dedication: Diversions is dedicated to Andrew Johnston, the son of long-time family friends, Jim and Lisa Johnston. Between 2001 and 2003, I dedicated three short pieces to each of Andrew’s older sisters (Claire, Julia, and Sarah). When Andrew was born in 2004, his father requested that any piece I write for Andrew be suitably big and loud, “preferably with anvils.” Alas, I couldn’t bring myself to include an anvil in the scoring for Diversions, though I trust a log drum and some tom-toms will suffice.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 04/09/2013

BEVIA, José

Noit-Alimissa

2013

8:40

José BEVIA

Noit-Alimissa

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 8:40

Instrumentation:

2*2*2*2.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

José Beviá graduated from Valencia Conservatory of Music, where he studied classical piano with José Luis de Prado; Berklee College of Music, and Florida State University where he earned a Doctor of Music Degree in Music Theory and Composition. Dr. Beviá has studied composition with Ladislav Kubík and Mark Wingate, and jazz piano with Marcus Roberts and Bill Peterson. He has participated in composition seminars with Pulitzer Prize winner Ms. Ellen Zwilich, and has been a member of the BMI Jazz Composers Workshop, where he studied with jazz composers Michael Abene, Jim McNeely, and Mike Holober. 

An Associate Professor of Music at County College of Morris in Randolph, New Jersey, Dr. Beviá has seen his Jazz and Classical compositions performed all over the world by the Moravian Philharmonic Orchestra, The BMI/New York Jazz Orchestra, and the Millennium Jazz Orchestra among others. His works have been commissioned by The Commission Project, the BMI Foundation Charlie Parker Composition Prize, Harpist Arielle, and Ferdiko Piano Duo. At the same time he has been invited to present his music at the 2008 International Jazz Composers Symposium in Tampa, Florida; the Society of Composers National Conference in Turlock, California; the College Music Society National Conference in Portland, Oregon; and the Czech American Music Summer Institute in Prague, Czech Republic. His debut C.D. has been released by MSR Classics and his compositions are published by The University of Northern Colorado Jazz Press. 

Dr. Beviá is the winner of the 2006 University of West Florida Phillips Jazz Piano Competition, the winner of the 2007 BMI Foundation Charlie Parker Composition Prize, finalist at the 2006 Brussels Jazz Orchestra International Composition Contest, finalist at the 2009 Artez International Composition Contest in The Netherlands, and Honorable Mention at the Minnesota Orchestra Composer Institute. Since 2005 he has been working as an assistant of renowned Jazz Pianist Mr. Marcus Roberts.

About Piece:

Noit-Alimissa (Assimilation) is an effort to combine the influences of Post Second World War Contemporary Classical Music with Contemporary Jazz, to create an organic
musical entity. The melodic, harmonic and rhythmic materials are announced in the introduction and developed through the composition following the the formal scheme: Introduction, A, B, C, A, Coda

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to José Bevia's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

BELLOR, Jennifer

Crystal Skies

2013

9:55

Jennifer BELLOR

Crystal Skies

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 9:55

Instrumentation:

2222.2221.timp+2.pno.str.elec bass

About Composer:

Jennifer Bellor is a versatile composer who enjoys collaborating with classical and jazz musicians, singers, dancers, librettists, and visual artists. Her works have been featured by ensembles, festivals, conferences, and forums including Washington National Opera, Lviv Philharmonic, Seattle Women’s Jazz Orchestra, ACO Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute readings in New York City, North American Saxophone Alliance Conference, Aspen Music Festival, Eastman New Jazz Ensemble, Eastman Wind Ensemble, Eastman Saxophone Project, UNLV Jazz Ensemble, Florida State University Festival of New Music, Hildegard Festival, Ritsos Project in Greece, and many others in the United states and abroad. She received a 2013 DownBeat Award for her composition Midnight Swim for big band in the original composition/ orchestrated work category at the graduate college level. Her composition Noir for big band won the 2nd Annual Seattle Women's Jazz Orchestra composition contest, and was performed in Seattle November 2014, featuring Grace Kelly on alto saxophone. Judges considered her piece “really beautiful and haunting,” and “reminiscent of Ornette’s collaboration with Howard Shore for the film Naked Lunch.” Additionally, she was commissioned by Washington National Opera's American Opera Initiative to write a 20-minute opera, Duffy's Cut, that was premiered at the Kennedy Center in November 2013. Her writing was praised as showing a “flair for full-bodied, operatic sound,” (Washington Post), and “using contrasting rhythms and clever harmonies to an intriguing effect” (Huffington Post). Bellor received a PhD in music composition at Eastman School of Music, a Master of Music degree in composition at Syracuse University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in music at Cornell University. Bellor is Visiting Lecturer at University of Nevada, Las Vegas where she teaches courses in music composition and theory

About Piece:

Crystal Skies (2013) was inspired by my experience skydiving for th first time in upstate New York. It was a chilly November day, and as the airplane ascended into the air, it became even more freezing thousands of feet above the ground. When the door of the plane opened, and I stepped out onto the ledge, I could not wait to fall backwards and sink into the clouds. The freefall lasted approximately one minute, and then I felt like I was just floating in the air. In my piece, I wanted to capture that feeling of being suspended in the chilly sky, as if I was flying. The string textures reflect the icy sky, portrayed by the artificial harmonics and ornamented lines that weave in and out of each other. The woodwinds represent birds gliding in the sky, and for a moment, I felt like a bird as I was slowly descending to the ground.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute ACO

Conductor: Delta David Gier

Date of reading: 06/04/2013

BEECHER, Lembit

Chopin's Ocean

2016

8:00

Lembit BEECHER

Chopin's Ocean

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 8:00

Instrumentation:

2*222.2210.ttimp+2.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Lembit Beecher strives to create intimate, heartfelt, quirky and dramatically potent musical experiences. Born to Estonian and American parents, he grew up under the redwoods in Santa Cruz, California, a few miles from the wild Pacific. Since then he has lived in Boston, Houston, Ann Arbor, Berlin, New York and Philadelphia, earning degrees from Harvard, Rice and the University of Michigan. This varied background has made him particularly sensitive to place, ecology, memory, and the multitude of ways in which people tell stories. In 2011 Lembit was appointed to a three-year term as the inaugural composer-in-residence of Opera Philadelphia in collaboration with Gotham Chamber Opera and Music Theatre Group. Many of Lembit’s projects involve the incorporation of untraditional elements into operatic form, working with baroque instruments, animation, electronics, new technologies, and devised theatre actors. Recent awards include a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, the S&R Foundation Washington Award Grand Prize, a residency at the Penn Museum sponsored by the American Composers Forum, and a grant from the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage to develop a new chamber opera with librettist Hannah Moscovitch, featuring soprano, string quartet, and a large music-generating sculpture.

About Piece:

In 1949, my grandmother, mother, and aunt were on a ship traveling across the Atlantic, displaced by WWII, and far from their native Estonia. My grandmother used to tell me how she was summoned to the ship’s officers’ quarters, the captain having learned that she was a concert pianist. As the unbolted piano bench slid back and forth, and the boat rocked and heaved, my grandmother poured her pains into the piano, playing Chopin’s third Etude, known to her as “Chopin’s sorrow.” She was lucky, traveling aboard a stout ship in a time when the US was actively welcoming displaced persons. But these days, as I hear about migrants desperately floating across the Mediterranean in an attempt to get to Europe, it is easy to imagine my grandmother, or someone like her, not making it; I imagine a storm sinking the ship and the sounds of her piano spreading out across the ocean. And I imagine far away, a mother and daughter standing by the seashore, hearing just a faint glimmer of Chopin drifting in the waves.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

BALDINI, Christian

Elapsing Twilight Shades

2009

10:00

Christian BALDINI

Elapsing Twilight Shades

Year Composed: 2009

Timing (in minutes): 10:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Christian Baldini's work as a conductor and composer has gathered recognition in several International Competitions around the world (South Korea, USA, Brazil, Argentina-UNESCO). His music has been performed in festivals and venues throughout Europe, South America, North America and Asia by orchestras and ensembles including the Southbank Sinfonia (London), New York New Music Ensemble, Daegu Chamber Orchestra (South Korea), Orchestre National de Lorraine (France), Chronophonie Ensemble (Freiburg), the American Brass Quintet, the Barton Workshop (Amsterdam), the National Polyphonic Choir of Argentina, the New York Virtuoso Singers, the Kreisler Ensemble (London) and the Illegal Harmony Ensemble (Scotland).  
Christian is currently the Music Director and Conductor of the Symphony Orchestra at the State University of New York at Buffalo. He regularly guest conducts in South America, England (Aldeburgh Festival) and the USA. Most recently he was invited by Leonard Slatkin to conduct the National Symphony Orchestra (Washington, DC). This summer he will be conducting the Royal Scottish National Orchestra working with Martyn Brabbins, and will be a featured composer and conductor in Edenkoben (Germany). In the Fall 2009, Christian will begin his appointment as the director of orchestras at the University of California at Davis.

About Piece:

It is remarkable how one same object might look rather different depending on the moment of the day or night in which we look at it. Similarly, different situations can be seen from completely opposing points of view, depending on their context. Velocity, light, weight and texture can all vary in appearance at a glance. 

Elapsing twilight shades reflects my particular interest in creating sonic structures that behave in a quasi cubist fashion. In fact, listening to the piece is a bit like looking at an abstract painting. One idea is presented from several different perspectives. The ""space"" around the idea is manipulated, folded and viewed as if through a kaleidoscope, repeated by many different lenses. This is the starting point for a work that gradually becomes inflected by a few humorous moments and a delight in symphonic tradition. There are two main critical arrivals in the piece, where the previous music is expanded into a more rhapsodic and quite different dimension. For me these moments represent a special ideal of collective beauty, achieved only through hope and freedom.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Memphis Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: David Loebel

Date of reading: 05/21/2009

BALCH, Katherine

Leaf Catalogue

2016

9:20

Katherine BALCH

Leaf Catalogue

Year Composed: 2016

Timing (in minutes): 9:20

Instrumentation:

2*22*2*.4221.timp+2.hrp.pno/cel.str

About Composer:

Katherine Balch (b.1991) writes music that explores lyricism through textural soundscapes. Her music has been commissioned and performed by the Albany Symphony Orchestra, the New York Youth Symphony (First Music Commission), Ensemble Intercontemporain (IRCAM ManiFeste), Collage New Music, the Yale Camerata, Aspen Contemporary Ensemble, Antico Moderno, FLUX Quartet (Santa Fe Chamber Music), ZOFO duo, the New York Virtuoso Singers, Yale Philharmonia,  Alea III, and flute-piano duo Zachary Sheets and Wei-Han Wu (New Music USA) in such venues as Carnegie Hall, National Sawdust, and Centquatre (Paris). Other recognitions include fellowships from Aspen, Norfolk, and Fontainebleau music festivals, several ASCAP Morton Gould Awards, New England Conservatory’s Donald Martino Prize, Fontainebleau’s Prix du Composition, and first prize in America Modern Ensemble’s 8th annual Composition Competition. She is currently pursuing her Master’s at Yale School of Music, studying with David Lang. Aside from composing, Katherine enjoys writing program notes for Yale School of Music concerts, various combinations of espresso and steamed milk, and the outdoors. She will begin her doctorate in composition at Columbia University in the fall as a Dean’s Fellow.

About Piece:

Leaf Catalogue is an ode to all the tiny little netted veins, the malachite spines and splintery emerald epidermi, the viridian curves and fern-green webs turned to sea-foam in the sun.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/14/2016

AUGUST, Gregg

Una Rumba Sinfonica

2013

3:30

Gregg AUGUST

Una Rumba Sinfonica

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 3:30

Instrumentation:

2*222.2221.timp+2.pno.str

About Composer:

One of the most sought-after bassists and “musician’s musician” on the New York scene, what sets bassist Gregg August apart is his musical language which spans the jazz, Latin, classical and avant-garde worlds. August spent two years at SUNY Albany as a percussion major, where he began to study bass. He transferred to The Eastman School of Music and earned a bachelor’s degree, and then promptly made the move to New York City to study with legendary bass teacher Homer Mensch at The Juilliard School. Soon after receiving his Master's, August won the Principal bass position with La Orquestra Ciutat de Barcelona. After two years in Spain he moved to Paris to check out the jazz scene but soon found himself hungry to return to New York. Gregg became extremely inspired by Latin music which led him to Cuba and Brazil and soon becoming a student of master Latin bassist, Andy Gonzalez, then touring with Ray Barretto’s New World Spirti, and further collaborations with Dave Douglas and Dafnis Prieto . August formed his own sextet in 2003, holds the Principal Bass Chair of the Brooklyn Philharmonic, and also performs regularly with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra,  in the trailblazing program, OneBeat.  August was a recipient of a Jerome Foundation/Jazz Gallery commission for a large ensemble. 

About Piece:

The piece I'm proposing would incorporate the rhythmic techniques used in Cuban rumba, utilizing its language to move the orchestra into a fresh direction and beyond its normal boundaries. As a musician who plays both classical and Cuban music, I feel I have a unique understanding and experience to bring these two very distinct musical worlds together.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Gregg August's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Buffalo Philharmonic JCOI

Conductor: Matthew Kraemer

Date of reading: 04/24/2013

AKIHO, Andy

Tarnished Mirrors

2014

7:30

Andy AKIHO

Tarnished Mirrors

Year Composed: 2013

Timing (in minutes): 7:30

Instrumentation:

2222.4221.timp+3.hrp.str

About Composer:

Andy Akiho is a contemporary composer whose interests run from steel pan to traditional classical music. Recent engagements include commissioned premieres by the New York Philharmonic and Carnegie Hall’s Ensemble ACJW, a performance with the LA Philharmonic, and three shows at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC featuring original works. His rhythmic compositions continue to increase in recognition with recent awards including the 2014-15 Luciano Berio Rome Prize, a 2012 Chamber Music America Grant with Sybarite5, the 2011 Finale & ensemble eighth blackbird National Composition Competition Grand Prize, the 2012 Carlsbad Composer Competition Commission for Calder Quartet, the 2011 Woods Chandler Memorial Prize (Yale School of Music), a 2011 Music Alumni Award (YSM), the 2010 Horatio Parker Award (YSM), three ASCAP Plus Awards, an ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composers Award, and a 2008 Brian M. Israel Prize. His compositions have been featured on PBS’s “News Hour with Jim Lehrer” and by organizations such as Bang on a Can, American Composers Forum, and The Society for New Music.

A graduate of the University of South Carolina (BM, performance), the Manhattan School of Music (MM, contemporary performance), and the Yale School of Music (MM, composition), Akiho is currently pursuing a Ph.D. at Princeton University. In addition to attending the 2013 International Heidelberger Frühling, the 2011 Aspen Summer Music Festival, and the 2008 Bang on a Can Summer Festival as a composition fellow, Akiho was the composer in residence for the 2013 Chamber Music Northwest Festival and the 2012 Silicon Valley Music Festival. In 2014, Akiho will attend the Intimacy of Creativity Festival at the Hong Kong University of Science & Technology and The American Academy in Rome as a composer fellow.

About Piece:

Deadlines are great sources for inspiration! I remember finding out about the ACO orchestral reading opportunities (Underwood and EarShot) this past autumn and thinking that I would love to participate; however, I did not have a standard orchestra piece. The only orchestral work that I ever wrote was a short steel pan concerto, which did not qualify since it was a concerto. I believe the deadline was in the first few days of December. So, after Thanksgiving rolled around and all the melatonic turkey wore off, I decided to write a short orchestral work because it has been a dream of mine to write for larger ensembles with infinite timbral pallets. After six straight days of non-stop composing and sleeplessness, I finished this short, brand-spanking new work titled Tarnished Mirrors. One day, I would love to expand this piece into a three-movement composition and come up with some “real” program notes after it has marinated, and after I have had some time to think about what the material is truly about when speaking beyond the musical vocabulary.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Andy Akiho's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

Underwood New Music Readings, American Composers Orchestra

Conductor: George Manahan

Date of reading: 06/07/2014

AHN, Jean

Salt

2009

3:00

Jean AHN

Salt

Year Composed: 2007

Timing (in minutes): 3:00

Instrumentation:

About Composer:

Born in Korea, Jean Ahn began to study piano and composition at a very early age. She finished her B.A. and M.M. at Seoul National University under professor Baek Byoung Dong. In fall 2008, Jean finished her Ph.D at UC Berkeley where her teachers included Edmund Campion, Cindy Cox, David Wessel, Jorge Liederman and Richard Felciano.
Her creative output includes works ranging from solo instruments to full orchestra, as well as choral, dance and electroacoustic music. Recent awards for her compositions include 1st prize from the Rennee Fisher Award and Competition, the Korean National Music Composers Award, 1st prize from the Sejong Korean Music Competition, UC Berkeley’s the De Lorenzo Prize and the Pan Music Festival Award. Jean’s music was featured at Aspen Music Festival(Susan and Ford Schumann Composition Fellow), June in Buffalo, the Oregon Bach Festival, Music 07, SCI conferences, IAWM Beijing Congress, the Spark Festival, the Fresno New Music Festival, University of Central Missouri New Music Festival, New York City Electronic Music Festival, IAWM Festivals, among others. Her work has been performed by  Ensemble Sur Plus, pianist Lisa Moore (Bang on a can), pianist Shannon Wettstein (Zeitgeist), Berkeley Contemporary Players and others.

Recently she has focused on orchestral works. Her orchestra piece “Salt” was premiered by the UC Berkeley’s University Symphony, under the baton of David Milnes in May 2008 and also received Honorable Mention from the ACO Underwood New Music Reading judges. Her further orchestral experience was with Berkeley Symphony (director, Joana Carneiro), where she wrote three new pieces as an Emerging Composer in Residence. Dr.Ahn has also studied electronic/computer music at CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technologies) and is interested in integrating technology and Asian traditional instruments and elements.
Currently she is working on a choral piece commissioned by San Francisco based choir group Volti. She is also working on a dance project collaborating with Ongdance company and video artist Yewon Cho. This work is funded by the Seoul Arts School Alumni Association. 
 
She is currently a Lecturer at UC.Berkeley and lives in the Bay Area with her husband and two young children.

About Piece:

Salt began its life in 2005, when I found myself driven by a chord of six notes. First I made a progression moving the chord by parallel motion. Then I changed the inner voices, rotated the notes, inverted the chord, juxtaposed it with its mirror and other transpositions of the chord, and added more notes to the chord. To color the chord, I added non-harmonic tones as ornamentation. These non-harmonic tones normally resolve to the harmonic tones, and thus end up doubling the chord tones themselves. In short, I experimented with all the possibilities opened up by this one chord. The idea of transforming a single chord without losing its fundamentals, combined with the sparkling image of the ornaments, reminded me of the properties of salt. Thus was born the title of the composition. Just as salt preserves its taste no matter what it is mixed with, the essence of the original chord of the piece is not lost throughout the entire work. In order to enhance the metaphor, the electronics used in the piece—built on the resonance model of the main chord with spectral transformation—employ the actual sound of dropping, spreading and touching salt. Finally, the title Salt also reflects my Christian faith and my musing on the words “Ye are the salt of the earth.” Thus the piece has the touch, taste and also the meaning of salt.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Jean Ahn's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot Memphis Symphony New Music Readings

Conductor: David Loebel

Date of reading: 05/21/2009

ADOLPHE, Julia

Dark Sand, Sifting Light

2014

8:20

Julia ADOLPHE

Dark Sand, Sifting Light

Year Composed: 2014

Timing (in minutes): 8:20

Instrumentation:

3*333.4231.timp+3.hrp.pno.str

About Composer:

Julia Adolphe (b. 1988) is a composer, writer, and soprano whose music embraces diverse artistic and sociological influences, unfolding intricate emotional narratives. Adolphe’s work has received performances across the United States and abroad in New York City, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Paris, Berlin, and Pavia, Italy. Sylvia, a chamber opera based on her original story and libretto, has been presented by Bargemusic (NYC), The Lost Studio Theatre (Los Angeles); and the Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, in excerpt. Adolphe is currently  working on a new opera set in present-day Iran.  Adolphe has received numerous awards for her compositions, including grants from the American Composers Forum, New Music USA, Sam Spiegel Foundation, Anna Sosenko Assist Trust, and Puffin Foundation. She received the Theodore Front Prize from the International Alliance for Women in Music, the Jimmy McHugh Composition Prize, John James Blackmore Prize, and John S. Knight Prize. Adolphe is currently pursuing a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the USC Thornton School of Music studying composition with Stephen Hartke. Prior teachers include Steven Stucky, Donald Crockett, and Frank Ticheli. Adolphe holds a Master of Music degree in music composition from USC and a Bachelor of Arts degree in music composition and literary theory from Cornell University.

Julia Adolphe is a recipient of the League of American Orchestras Virginia B. Toulmin Foundation Women Composers Commision.

About Piece:

Dark Sand, Sifting Light imagines a piano playing in the distance, overheard through an open apartment window. As the listener poised beneath the window begins to daydream, the piano sounds take on larger orchestral colors. Her mind wanders and the music transforms.

Composer's Bio:


                        

Composer's Website

Link to Julia Adolphe's Website

Earshot Orchestra/Program:

EarShot New York Philharmonic New Music Readings

Conductor: Alan Gilbert

Date of reading: 06/03/2014